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Download The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography ePub

by Eileen R Tabios

Download The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography ePub
  • ISBN 0979241626
  • ISBN13 978-0979241628
  • Language English
  • Author Eileen R Tabios
  • Publisher Marsh Hawk Press (January 1, 2007)
  • Pages 376
  • Formats docx txt lrf mbr
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Poetry
  • Size ePub 1134 kb
  • Size Fb2 1668 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 227

Poetry. Memoir. Asian American Studies. Filipino American Studies. Winner of the Philippines' National Book Award for Poetry, Eileen R. Tabios has a reputation for uniquely melding ekphrasis and transcolonialism. This collection of poems, prose and visual poetry is her most overtly political work yet, referencing her roots as a "Marcos Baby," a member of the generation that grew up under Ferdinand Marcos' dictatorship. On April 11, 2006, Filamore B. Tabios, Sr. died of brain cancer and its complications. In writing about her father, Eileen R. Tabios explores reconciliation with Ferdinand Marcos' legacy through deliberate empathy with the former Philippine dictator's daughter Imee; pays homage to Judas Iscariot whose Gospel, discovered during her vigil by her father's deathbed, reveals him to be the most loyal disciple, instead of greatest betrayer of Jesus Christ; meditates on the murder statistics of the 20th century's leading killers, from Idi Amin to Adolf Hitler; considers the global Filipina pen pal phenomena; and engages with Dante Aleghieri's Purgatorio.

Born in Ilocos Sur, Philippines, Tabios moved to the United States at the age of ten. She holds a .

Born in Ilocos Sur, Philippines, Tabios moved to the United States at the age of ten. in political science from Barnard College and an .

The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes (multi-genre poetry). The Blind Chatelaine's Keys (biography with haybun).

1960 Ilocos Sur, Philippines. The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes (multi-genre poetry). NOVEL CHATELAINE (novel).

Winner of the Philippines' National Book Award for Poetry, Eileen R. Tabios has a reputation for uniquely melding . Tabios has a reputation for uniquely melding ekphrasis and transcolonialism. Poet and writer Eileen Tabios was born in the Philippines and moved to the United States when she was 10. She earned a BA in political science from Barnard College and an MBA from New York University's Stern School of Business. Tabios has a reputation for uniquely melding ekphrasis and transcolonialism

Winner of the Philippines' National Book Award for Poetry, Eileen R. This collection of poems, prose and visual poetry is her most overtly political work yet, referencing her roots as a "Marcos Baby," a member of the generation that grew up under Ferdinand Marcos' dictatorship.

Eileen R. Tabios is a poet working in multiple genres and in-between. The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography, 2007. Nota Bene Eiswein, 2009. She also loves books by writing, reading, publishing, critiquing, romancing and advocating for them. Footnotes to Algebra: Uncollected Poems 1995-2009, 2009.

THE LIGHT SANG AS IT LEFT YOUR EYES: Our Autobiography (Marsh Hawk Press, New York, 2007). SILENCES: The Autobiography of Loss (Blue Lion Books, Espoo, Finland, West Hartford, Conn. DREDGING FOR ATLANTIS (Otoliths, Australia, 2006). THE SECRET LIVES OF PUNCTUATIONS (Vol. 1) (xPress(ed), Finland, 2006).

The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography Jan 01, 2007. Tabios (born 1960) is an award-winning Filipino-American poet, fiction . The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our autobiography. New York: Marsh Hawk Press, 2007.

Tabios was born in Ilocos Sur, Philippines. She is the founder of Meritage Press, a multidisciplinary literary and arts press based in St. Helena, California.

Silences: the autobiography of loss. THE SINGER And Others. THE CHAINED HAY(NA)KU PROJECT ANTHOLOGY, As Curator (with Ivy Alvarez, John Bloomberg-Rissman and Ernesto Priego). SILK EGG: Collected Novels (2009-2009).

Eileen Tabios's biography and life story

Eileen Tabios's biography and life story. Her mixed-genre works include I Take Thee, English, for My Beloved (2005); the political and The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography (2007), which deals with her father’s life; and The Blind Chatelaine’s Keys: Her Biography through Your Poetics (2008), a biography of Tabios based on other writers’ critiques of. her work (the title references her blogging name, Chatelaine).

Talk about The Light Sang As It Left Your Eyes: Our Autobiography


Nenayally
Eileen R. Tabios is one of the best avant garde and experimental poets alive today. Her poetic explorations -- scumbling, ekphrasis, Hay(na)Ku --demonstrate a zest for words and meanings as she shapes poems that reflect her world. Black sorrows, bright hopes, harsh injustices, a poisoned environment, new poetic forms, and boundless love share equal time on each skillfully crafted page published. In this latest book, Tabios proves that she has mastered prose equal to her exceptional poetry.

In April, 2006, Eileen Tabios' father died. Filamore B. Tabios, Sr. had fled the Philippines with his family when Ferdinand Marcos came to power. He was an old world father, patriarchal and strong-willed in his dealings with an equally strong-willed daughter. In this book, as she spends time in the hospital at her dying father's bedside, the boundaries and divisions between them soften. The journal she shares in this book is a remarkable psalm to life. Consider this excerpt from the opening poem -- "Sentences" -- to understand the poet's heart:

The same book you read to excavate me is a fiction I sculpted to soften
my marble core, as if -- and I still don't know -- words can save me from
myself.

The same poem you are feeling your way through is a thin, blue vein dug
out from beneath my flesh for the color of a sky breaking into scarlet to
set words afire.

Somehow, those dying days in April clarify the poet's vision and understanding. She makes sense out of her sorrow by identifying with Marcos' daughter, Imee. In "What Can a Daughter Say?", Eileen Tabios acts as surrogate for Imee Marcos and both daughters learn what their fathers were, and were not:

The palace of one's childhood
-- for even those who could afford
the bricks to obviate metaphor --
is usually constructed from memory.

Ms. Tabios and her peers have perfected the art of Hay(na)Ku, a poem comprised of six words and three lines. Tabios edits and writes, writes and edits as she struggles through the reality of losing her father to cancer:

The poem cannot
be pure.
Sound

never travels unimpeded
by anonymous
butterflies.

Her father`s dying does not soften Eileen Tabios` reflections on injustice. "April in Los Angeles" is a 120 verse contemplation on love, grief, horror, exhaustion and regret that zeroes in on the cost cutting cruelty practiced by modern hospitals. Tabios fans will discover that sorrow has neither blurred her outlook on world politics or injustice, nor smothered her passionate love of friends, family, and literary excellence. This autobiography in poetry and prose is typical Tabios -- intensely personal yet international in flavor -- with translations by and collaborations with her peers from other lands. Highly recommended.
Delan
The more I encounter Eileen Tabios' writings--(and I mean that word "encounter" exactly as I wrote it, for to read Eileen Tabios is encounter her, no more, no less)--the more I'm convinced that she's a force of nature instead of a mere scribbling mortal like the rest of us. I imagine Dr. Bucke must have felt the same way about Walt Whitman who time and again in his poems tells us that who touches his book touches him. (Of course his eventual encounter with the aging poet is a different matter.) Tabios manages to do the same thing with this book, and in fact even begins to talk in "we's" instead of "I's" toward the end of it. The big question is: how does she manage to pull this transfiguration off in a skeptical age when writing like this must be done with tongue firmly in cheek and a roll of the eyes to escape jeers and sneers? Well, first one must know exactly who one is to do it. Tabios is one of the most consistent personalities in contemporary women's poetry. We know almost all there is to know about her, and if we don't know it, a turn of the page or a click on one of her many website links will tell us! But isn't this just a dazzling show of--narcissism? Absolutely not. Her seemingly artless style of writing draws one in and by the end of whatever it is we are reading we feel as if we were sitting in the living room of a gracious friend leaning near to tell us the story she needs to share with us at that particular moment. Often the tone is like that of a letter from your sister--you feel almost embarrassingly close to the writer. She addresses you as a "peep" and her team of readers as "peeps"! (I turn to the beat-up, jaded face in the mirror and giggle. "You are a peep" I say, feeling completely rejuvenated, but still managing to stick my tongue out just the same.) Moreover, she refers to herself over and over as "Moi". Moi? So there is the sacred dichotomy in Tabios terms, or in other words, I and the Other. Yes, Tabios knows who she is--she is completely comfortable with her role as Other. But what exactly does that "Otherness" entail? First she is a Philippine-American writer and in her pages she displays the history, the culture, and the mind-set. Next she is a daughter who has lost her father, and we are allowed into the presence of the dead and given the opportunity to mourn with her, to over-hear her mother as she mummers to the body of the man she shared her life with, and to know the details of the mourning, the ritual and the burial. After that we move not only towards a revelation of the transfiguration of her father's spirit, but a joyful openness and acceptance that takes the form of a series of collaborations with various poets and artists, and this arms-wide embracing of other Others and placing them between the same covers and in the same bindings--well, this is where she becomes larger than her readers and her boundaries drift off the page and assume the receding horizons of the world wide net. What energy! What charm! And this doesn't even begin to address the many virtuoso forms she displays in her "warm" rather than "cool" experimentalism.