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Download The Tale of a Tub and Other Works ePub

by Jonathan Swift

Download The Tale of a Tub and Other Works ePub
  • ISBN 1417914122
  • ISBN13 978-1417914128
  • Language English
  • Author Jonathan Swift
  • Publisher Kessinger Publishing, LLC (April 1, 2005)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats mobi mbr azw lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Short Stories and Anthologies
  • Size ePub 1289 kb
  • Size Fb2 1826 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 574

This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Shelves: 18th-c-brit, proto-novels. Mass literacy did not mean mass intelligence. So many writers in Swifts time, through their numerous nauseating preludes, digressions, and postludes, endeavored A book about the vanity of books.

Jonathan Swift's Tale of the Tub is a brilliant failure. Swift's tub is intended to distract Hobbes and other critics of the church and government from picking holes in their weak points. It is a prose satire intended as a defence of the Anglican church, but it was widely interpreted by contemporary readers as an attack on all religion. One of the things that makes the Tale difficult to interpret for that the work attacks multiple things of things at the same time: it's an allegory about religious differences; it's a satire on pedantry and false scholarship; it's a parody of the contemporary book trade; it has attached to it two further treatises, the 'Battle of the Books'.

The hilarity flows and never grows repetitive or dull.

The other works in the volume are a nicely eclectic selection. The W. W. Norton Selected Works of Swift is better at giving the author's range, but Ross picks well and gives a nice representation here. The effect is to not only fully situate the Tale (even giving space to the silly Thomas Swift), but to give a snapshot of early Swift. 11 people found this helpful. The hilarity flows and never grows repetitive or dull.

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was born in Dublin, Ireland. Many of his books were strong attacks on the political life of the times, but he was very popular with the people.

Thomas Swift and A Tale of a Tub. 192. Explanatory Notes. Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was born in Dublin, Ireland. Gulliver's Travels is his most famous book. Angus Ross is at University of Sussex. Bibliographic information. A Tale of a Tub and Other Works Oxford world's classics.

Jonathan Swift rocks my world! There's little scholarly apparatus here, just Swift trying to. .If you read A Tale of a Tub, perhaps as assigned reading the foot notes will aid comprehension

Jonathan Swift rocks my world! There's little scholarly apparatus here, just Swift trying to make a name for himself. If you read A Tale of a Tub, perhaps as assigned reading the foot notes will aid comprehension. If you goal is to read Swift books from many parts of his career, that is about the only reason to voluntarily read this book. 4 people found this helpful.

A Tale of a Tub was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, arguably his most . Jonathan Swift was an Irish author and satirist.

A Tale of a Tub was the first major work written by Jonathan Swift, arguably his most difficult satire and perhaps his most masterly. The Tale is a prose parody divided into sections each delving into the morals and ethics of the English. Composed between 1694 and 1697, it was eventually published in 1704. Best known for writing Gulliver's Travels, he was dean of St. Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin. Born on November 30, 1667, Irish author, clergyman and satirist Jonathan Swift grew up fatherless. Under the care of his uncle, he received a bachelor's degree from Trinity College and then worked as a statesman's assistant.

This volume contains the three works which together make up Jonathan Swift's early satiric and intellectual masterpiece, A Tale of a Tub: the Tale itself, The Battel of the Books, and The Mechanical Operation of the Spirit. The introduction discusses publication, composition, and authorship; sources, analogues and generic models; reception; and religious, scientific and literary contexts (including the ancients and moderns controversy).

A Tale of a Tub was first published by the Irish clergyman and novelist Jonathan Swift in 1704; it is the first and . Perhaps most importantly the Tale engages directly with the debates concerning the ‘Ancients and Moderns’ that raged during the early 1700s.

A Tale of a Tub was first published by the Irish clergyman and novelist Jonathan Swift in 1704; it is the first and perhaps most difficult of all his satires. The title is thought to refer to a dissenting priest’s pulpit, and the work is a biting parody on the religious extravagances that Swift perceived among the clergy at the start of the 18th century.

This vintage book contains Jonathan Swift's 1704 satire, A Tale of a Tub. The first major work that he wrote, it is a prose parody about two brothers who are each representative of the chief aspects of western Christianity. It mainly deals with the ideas of religious enthusiasm, pride, and credulity. Published at a time when religion was an intrinsic aspect of politics, the work was widely condemned, with Queen Anne going as far as to call it profane.

Стр. 130 - Epicurus modestly hoped that, one time or other, a certain fortuitous concourse of all men's opinions, after perpetual justlings, the sharp with the smooth, the light and the heavy, the round and the square, would by certain clinamina unite in the notions of atoms and void, as these did in the originals of all things. Встречается в книгах (91) с 1705 по 2006 chaps.

Talk about The Tale of a Tub and Other Works


Vivados
Angus Ross is one of the top people in Augustan prose studies, and his annotations for this edition are well done. For college students and those with college educations who are reading A Tale of a Tub and its associated works, the introduction and appended works are sufficient to give an overview. The Tale is an "impossible" work, and giving any student a complete review is impossible, as it is a work that opens every category of question, every matter of philosophy, religion, history, and rhetoric, and Ross splits the difference admirably. This annotations sometimes explain the self-evident, but he rarely misses a vital spot that needs explanation. On the other hand, the annotations are all in end note format, and so students and readers who are unfamiliar with Augustan history and the literary context of the work have to continually flip back and forth to "get the jokes." Simply moving to real footnotes would make an enormous difference for readers (e.g. the 1920 and 1958 Oxford UP standard editions edited by Guthkelch and Smith).

The other works in the volume are a nicely eclectic selection. The W. W. Norton Selected Works of Swift is better at giving the author's range, but Ross picks well and gives a nice representation here. The effect is to not only fully situate the Tale (even giving space to the silly Thomas Swift), but to give a snapshot of early Swift.

For anyone teaching, or teaching him or herself, this greatest of Swift's prose satires, this is far and away the best, affordable edition.
Vikus
A renowned critic suggested it may be,(after Shakespeare) the best prose in the language. That got my attention. It is indeed brilliant and scathing. It is also timeless. He compares Catholicism, Anglicanism and Calvinism. He calls his characters Peter {for St. Peter representing Catholicism}, Martin (for Martin Luther...representing Anglicanism) and Jack (for John Calvin representing Calvinism). As Swift was an Anglican clergyman, his sentiments obviously resided there. His over all message is an attack on dogmatism. Modern day fanatics could benefit by reading this piece.
Forcestalker
Until a better edition is available, this literally scanned copy of an old library book (with a random reader's occasional words copied in the margins--no joke) will have to do. The Tale of the Tub: breath-takingly powerful writing, hilarious and yet will set any reader down a few pegs by satirizing some of our most common points of pride. Harold Bloom reads it once a year, apparently. I probably will too.
JoJosho
Jonathan Swift's best work of satire. Enough said.
KiddenDan
When Harold Bloom was asked which books he returns to most often, Bloom said:

"I re-read Jonathan Swift's A Tale of the Tub twice a year, but that's to punish myself. It is, I think, the most powerful, nonfictive prose in the English language, but it's a kind of vehement satire upon visionary projectors as it were, like myself, and so I figure it is a good tonic and corrective for me."

In The Western Canon, Bloom says:

"Tale of a Tub has always impressed me as the best prose in the English Language after Shakespeare's"

These comments drew me to A Tale of a Tub and I was not disappointed. The hilarity flows and never grows repetitive or dull. No part drags. I highly recommend this edition because the notes are very helpful.
Boraston
Given the state of the world's politics and the unfavorable impact they have on the common man in so many countries, I frequently speculate about what Swift might have to say today.
Antuiserum
A Tale of a Tub is certainly Swift's least classifiable work. He's best known, of course, for Gulliver's Travels. This work was mostly written at the very start of his career, when he hadn't yet totally hardened into his later misanthropy, and it has all the demented exuberance of a great writer in his mid-20s finding a voice.
It defies description. The kernel of it is a satire on religious controversies, but that makes up about a third of the actual text. The rest is a series of prologues, forewords, dedications, prefaces, afterwords, epilogues and appendices, the sheer profusion of which suggest very much that Swift is poking dire fun at the idea of writing itself. In that respect, it goes further than any 20th century French golden boy of artistic revolt; Artaud looks like a stamped-in-tin romantic poet when set against Swift's manic nihilism. A Tale of a Tub is the closest anyone has ever got to writing a book that tackles head-on the futility of writing books, but that's only one interpretation of it. It exhausts interpretation by being as near as possible about nothing at all - and hence about everything. Plus it's not even 200 pages long. Swift never wrote as irresponsibly ever again, although the Travels, 'A Modest Proposal', the Bickerstaffe Papers, the 'Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift' and the Drapier's Letters are all admirable enough. A Tale of a Tub is as comprehensive a piece of literary terrorism as was ever attempted.