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Download Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon ePub

by Noel Sturgeon,Spider Robinson,Connie Willis,Theodore Sturgeon

Download Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon ePub
  • ISBN 1556438346
  • ISBN13 978-1556438349
  • Language English
  • Author Noel Sturgeon,Spider Robinson,Connie Willis,Theodore Sturgeon
  • Publisher North Atlantic Books; First Ed edition (October 20, 2009)
  • Pages 312
  • Formats lrf lit rtf azw
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory Short Stories and Anthologies
  • Size ePub 1648 kb
  • Size Fb2 1200 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 539

Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout, and his work was an acknowledged influence on important younger writers from Harlan Ellison and Robert Silverberg to Stephen King and Octavia Butler. His work has long been deeply appreciated for its sardonic sensibility, dazzling wordplay, conceptual brilliance, memorable characters, and unsparing treatment of social issues such as sex, war, and marginalized members of society. Sturgeon also authored several episodes of the original Star Trek TV series and originated the Vulcan phrase “Live long and prosper.” This twelfth volume of North Atlantic’s ambitious series reprinting his complete short stories includes classic works such as the award-winning title story, which won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards in 1971, as well as “Case and the Dreamer,” a well-crafted tale of an encounter with a trans-spatial being that is also a meditation on love, and “The [Widget], the [Wadget], and Boff,” a creative exploration of the human ability to achieve self-realization in response to crisis. The book includes a new Foreword, an illuminating section of Story Notes, and a comprehensive index for the entire series.

Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout.

Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).

Sturgeon's "The Perfect Host" was the cover story in the November 1948 . Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon. Berkeley, CA. ISBN 978-1-55643-834-9.

Sturgeon's "The Perfect Host" was the cover story in the November 1948 Weird Tales. An early version of Sturgeon's first novel, "The Dreaming Jewels", was the cover story in the February 1950 issue of Fantastic Adventures. Sturgeon's novella "The Incubi of Parallel X" was the cover story in the September 1951 Planet Stories. Sturgeon ghost-wrote one Ellery Queen mystery novel, The Player on the Other Side (Random House, 1963).

Version . DTD 032600. He didn’t know who he was when she met him-well, not many people did. He was in the high orchard doing something under a pear tree

Version . He was in the high orchard doing something under a pear tree. The land smelled of late summer and wind-bronze, it smelled bronze. He looked up at a compact girl in her mid-twenties, at a fearless face and eyes the same color as her hair, which was extraordinary because her hair was red-gold. She looked down at a leather-skinned man in his forties, at a gold-leaf electroscope in ‘his hand, and felt she was an intruder.

1 December 2009 Sturgeon is Neither Alive nor Well.

Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon Theodore Sturgeon Недоступно для .

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Theodore Sturgeon (1918-1985) is considered one of the greatest masters of the science fiction story and is ranked with classic contemporaries such as Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Ray Bradbury, and Arthur C. Clarke. He received the International Fantasy Award for his 1953 novel More Than Human, as well as Hugo and Nebula awards for his story "Slow Sculpture.

Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon. Slow Sculpture - Theodore Sturgeon. by Theodore Sturgeon, Connie Willis, and Spider Robinson. Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout, and his work was an acknowledged influence on important younger writers from Harlan Ellison and Robert Silverberg to Stephen King and Octavia Butler. His work has long been deeply appreciated for its sardonic sensibility, dazzling wordplay, conceptual brilliance, memorable characters, and unsparing treatment of social issues such as sex, war, and marginalized members of society.

Authors: Theodore Sturgeon, Spider Robinson. Authors: Theodore Sturgeon, Spider Robinson.

Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary .

Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout, and his work was an acknowledged influence on important. Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon.

Онлайн библиотека КнигоГид непременно порадует читателей текстами иностранных и российских писателей, а также гигантским выбором классических и современных произведений.

9781556438349 Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore . The book includes a new Foreword, an illuminating section of Story Notes, and a comprehensive index for the entire series.

9781556438349 Theodore Sturgeon was a model for his friend Kurt Vonnegut’s legendary character Kilgore Trout, and his work was an acknowledged influence on important younger writers from Harlan Ellison and Robert Silverberg to Stephen King and Octavia Butler.

Talk about Slow Sculpture: Volume XII: The Complete Stories of Theodore Sturgeon


godlike
Reading this one was kind of strange, if only for reasons that are highly specific to me and probably won't resonate with anyone else. When I started reading this series years and years ago (in the late nineties as the early volumes were coming out, before I wound up taking an unintended fifteen year hiatus) the one story the biographical blurbs kept referring to was "Slow Sculpture" since it had won the Hugo and Nebula the year it was published. I was at a stage where winning both awards to me meant the very pinnacle of SF reading and so very much looked forward to reading what in my mind had to be the best Sturgeon story ever written because two entirely separate groups of people who also really liked SF thought to give it their highest award at the same time.

Thing was, the blurbs never said what year the story was published and I didn't realize until much later that it came very late in his career. But every time a new volume would come out I would buy it (even when I was filing it to not be read right away) and flip through the table of contents to see if "Slow Sculpture" was there. And invariably as the volumes edged into the double digits, it was never there. When it did finally make an appearance in the penultimate volume of this series, one that bore its name (of course) I felt some kind of strange relief. Like, oh, there is it finally. We must be nearly done. When I finally reached the point where I was plunging through the volumes I had sort of forgotten which volume it was and so as I pulled each one off the stack, I would look at the one below (there were stacked in a way that I couldn't read the spines, which would have made this vastly easier) and not see it and wonder when I was getting to it.

And when I was getting ready to finally read it, after all these years, I felt a weird anticipation, wondering if it could possibly be as good as story as worth waiting all this time to read. After all, he'd written plenty of other stories that were masterpieces or had verged on them. Maybe this time the voters got it wrong, or were merely rewarding him for his past, peak efforts.

Well, you'll have to decide for yourselves but for me it was pretty much what I expected, probably his best late period story and maybe his last excellent story. In it, a woman who believes she's dying of cancer goes to a man that isn't a doctor but thinks maybe he can cure her. But that isn't the story, really, not when you come down to it. To me, the best of Sturgeon's stories maintain a subtle lyricism that sets them apart from the ones that are merely running through a keen idea, there's an emphatic passion to it, a sense of humanity as he sets two people who are isolated and may not want to be against each other and steps back to let the scenario play out while connecting it to a higher sense that we're all in this together and if the planet goes, we go too. A lot of his later stories have this slight element of preachiness to it, as if he'd grown tired of coaching his concerns in metaphor and was more focused on speaking directly to the reader through characters that would seek to lecture us about the perils the world is facing. Here, he puts the characters first and lets their human dramas and concerns take center stage as they air their damages and reveal their desires to be better, tying it into the metaphor put forth by the title. Its not his most bravura set of writing ("The Man Who Lost the Sea" probably takes the cake for that) but its got pretty much what people who describe what to look for in a great Sturgeon story would find, that broader sense that we can better than what we are writ both large and small, that caring about each other makes us better and in turn improves the world. That he's able to do it without being sickly sweet or cloying is a tribute to how real he makes it all feel (there's barely any SF). It's a problem anyone can have, but this is specifically how these particular people would solve it given the tools they have, and no one else.

It's a bittersweet feeling to have, to finally reach the story after a decade and a half knowing it was ahead the whole time (apparently I'm very methodical in my reading habits, before you ask) and while I can still read it again any time I'd like, I can never read it for the first time again.

Compared to that masterpiece, the rest are . . . decent. If not for "Slow Sculpture" we might have been in the same situation as the last story, where there were no real standout stories, just decent ones. Fortunately we have the old "The [Widget], the [Wadget] and Boff" published out of order because it wouldn't have fit anywhere else but a welcome surge of the Sturgeon of old, as he details a series of emotionally damaged people living in a boarding house, taking them in a Dos Passos style cross-section and setting aliens among them to push and prod them into maybe not being as damaged even as he makes it clear that in the end they need to be there for each other. And again, its a striking example of how he could write passionately and humanly without getting weepily sentimental.

There's one more near masterpiece to contend with "The Girl Who Knew What They Meant", one of the "Wina Stories" from around this period of his life, a brief exploration into what we do to each other when we're not completely honest with others and mostly ourselves, and what happens when someone can tell the difference. Brief as it is, it feels like Sturgeon fully engaged in attempting to convey a truth to us in a way that turns the situation around entirely from what we expect.

Meanwhile, the rest are . . . cute, for lack of a better term. A lot of them are short and mostly conventional (the one outlier "The Verity Files" told in a series of memos didn't quite work for me despite my normal predilection for authors who actively try to do something different), either lacking Sturgeon's tendency at his best to hit you straight in the gut at the very end or that aching honest lyricism that set him apart from others and even his more pedestrian efforts. A lot of them seem like set ups for a punchline ("Uncle Fremmis", "Crate" "Suicide", "Necessary and Sufficient") with very little else to latch onto, although generally the setup is competently done (although I will admit to a chuckle at the scatological slant to "Pruzy's Pot"). The rest tend to lapse into the hey-kids-lets-all-save-the-world lecturing that sometimes overcomes his stories at this stage of the game, where he's more interested in conveying an idea than giving us a story with people. None of them are bad but after the last couple volumes its clear that once we were past his fifties peak, the "wow-okay" ratio was definitely skewed more toward the latter.

Still, when he could do stuff like "Slow Sculpture", who cares, since a lot of writers can go their whole lives without writing one story that fantastic. All of these are at the very least entertaining and for us to demand more from a man who has squeezed himself dry for years churning out masterpieces seems both cruel and selfish. I'd love more masterpieces from Sturgeon but I would have loved there to be more stories from Sturgeon from then until today, period. The crime isn't that he wasn't as inspired a writer toward the tailend of his life, the crime isn't that he wasn't allowed more life to gift us with whatever brilliant fragments he wanted to give.
Chi
SLOW SCULPTURE is VOL XII of Theodore Sturgeon's complete short fiction and is a marked improvement over the previous volume. The collection starts out with "The Widget, the Wadget, and Boff", one of his greatest novellas. Written in the mid-1950s, this long and excellent story focuses on the inhabitants of a boarding house who are being studied and manipulated by aliens in an experiment to test the limits of human consciousness. The rest of the stories represent Sturgeon's last concentrated burst of creativity which occurred during 1970-1971, following a period of several years of relative inactivity due to writer's block. The title story "Slow Sculpture" may well be Sturgeon's last true masterpiece, an exquisite story about the meeting of a solitary disillusioned genius and a woman with a deadly illness. Sturgeon's use of the art of bonsai as a central metaphor for human relationships is ingenious and affecting. Other standouts include "The Girl Who Knew What They Meant", a story where a girl's unusual intuition turns out not to be such a great gift, and "Uncle Fremmis", a somewhat whimsical tale about a man with an unusual knack for fixing broken-down machines (and humans) by giving them a hard knock in the right place. Particularly interesting from today's standpoint is "The Verity Files", told as a series of interoffice memos wherein a pharmaceutical company attempts to suppress a cure for cancer mainly because it causes euphoria as a side effect and could be easily duplicated by competitors. This story is just as relevant today as it was nearly 40 years ago, given the ongoing debate about medical marijuana usage and the use of addictive painkillers. Other interesting stories include "Occam's Scalpel", wherein Sturgeon tackles environmental issues and warns about global warming decades before it became a widely-known concept, and "Dazed", wherein he poses (and answers) the question of whether a certain amount of chaos is necessary to allow change in the world.

What is most striking about these stories is the depth of emotion that burns through many of them, which contrasts markedly with the dispassionate irony and/or understatement which characterizes most recent fiction. Very few authors write in this manner today, which is unfortunate. When Sturgeon had something to say, he always said it with passion and conviction. He had a deep and abiding anger (although tempered with compassion) toward human behavior or societal values that he considered illogical, and he makes some very persuasive points in his stories. Although some of the stories may verge on preachiness, his sheer writing talent always keeps them entertaining, and his characters are superbly developed. At his best, Theodore Sturgeon was one of America's best short story writers, and anyone who appreciates great short fiction should be reading his work.
Dainris
The first story of Theodore Sturgeon I read was Slow Sculpture in World's Best Science Fiction 1971. That story stuck with me and after I lost that book, I've searched for this story off and on since. Now, I finally found that story and it is as I remembered it and is even better since I've matured (I like to Believe) and it still has that magical impact upon me now as it did then. What I like about Sturgeon is that he wrote about people and his stories can emote meaning with or without the science fiction elements. So now that I've discovered this series, I'm going back to Volume I and read and rediscover Sturgeon once more.
Nahelm
Readers should know that, unlike what it says in the promo blurb, this is not the final volume--there will be at least one more, entitled Case And The Dreamer, intended for publication next year. That said, this is a great selection of stories that you can look forward to reading, or re-reading, with enormous pleasure.
Redfury
As a lifelong Sturgeon fan, I have been snapping up the compilation book by book. It is fitting, somehow, that the finale carries as the title story one of my all time favorites. Bravo to the work that went into this compendium of the works of a great, but often overlooked author!
avanger
Love the short stories
Painshade
EXTRAORDINARILY HIGH QUALITY WRITING! GET EVERY ONE OF THESE VOLUMES. WE NEED A SERIES CONTAINING ALL OF HIS LONGER WORKS.