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Download Memory and Dream ePub

by Charles De Lint

Download Memory and Dream ePub
  • ISBN 0312855729
  • ISBN13 978-0312855727
  • Language English
  • Author Charles De Lint
  • Publisher Tor Books; 1st edition (October 1, 1994)
  • Pages 400
  • Formats lrf lit azw txt
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1207 kb
  • Size Fb2 1800 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 319

From her mentor, Rushkin, Isabell Copley had learned to paint creatures that come to life--literally--and years after these creatures have ruined her life, Isabelle returns to painting, haunted by memories, dreams, and the threat of her mentor's return.

Charles de Lint is perhaps and unsung visionary of modern fiction. Like de Lint’s other books Memory and Dream uses foreshadowing to make the twists obvious in hindsight but still not reveal the main climactic scene.

Charles de Lint is perhaps and unsung visionary of modern fiction. In the mid-1980s, along with a handful of other authors like Emma Bull and Terri Wilding, he all but invented the modern urban fantasy genre before it was hijacked by vampires and werewolves thanks to Anne Rice, Mark Rein-Hagen and Stephanie Meyer.

Dedicated to the memory of Ron Nance. Читать онлайн Memory and Dream. Dedicated to the memory of Ron Nance. I’m gonna miss you, pal. MEMORY AND DREAM The leaves are coming down, another circle going round Reminding me of you and brighter times When I got the news I cried and later realized I’ll carry a part of you for all my life -Kiya Heartwood, from No Goodbyes, No Regrets Night hovers all day in the boughs of the fir tree. Memory and dream. The leaves are coming down, another circle going round. Reminding me of you and brighter times.

Charles de Lint - Novelist, poet, artist, and musician, Charles de Lint is one of the most influential fantasy writers of his generation. With such warmly received works as Spiritwalk, Moonheart, Into the Green, and Dreams Underfoot(also set in the town of Newford), he has earned high praise from readers and critics alike, Booklist has called him one of the most original fantasy writers currently working.

Memory and Dream is the most ambitious work of de Lint’s extraordinary career, an exciting tale of epic scope that explores the power our dreams have to transform the world-or make it a waking nightmare

Author: Charles De Lint. Publisher: Tor, 1994. Memory and Dream is the most ambitious work of de Lint’s extraordinary career, an exciting tale of epic scope that explores the power our dreams have to transform the world-or make it a waking nightmare. It is the story of Isabelle Copley, a young artist who once lived in the bohemian quarter of the northern city of Newford. As a student of Vincent Rushkin, a cruel but gifted painter, she discovered an awesome power-to craft images so real that they came to life.

Isabelle artist Vincent Rushkin, she discovered she could paint images so vividly real they brought her wildest fantasies to life. But when the forces she unleashed brought tragedy to those she loved, she turned her back on her talent - and on her dreams. Now, her old master, she must find the courage to live out her dreams and bring the magic back to life. Goodreads Memory and Dream (Newford, #5).

Memory and Dream book. One of my book-club women had recommended Charles de Lint’s work to me and I knew that this book was one of my reading project books for this year

Memory and Dream book. Memory and Dream is the story of Isabelle Copley, a young artist. One of my book-club women had recommended Charles de Lint’s work to me and I knew that this book was one of my reading project books for this year. I took it on holiday with me, starting it on the airplane. To begin with, I was worried. I’m a dedicated fantasy reader and this was billed as fantasy and yet I wasn’t seeing how it could be fantasy. Imagine my I’ve been looking forward to this book for a while now and was so glad that it met my expectations, although in a way that I did not expect.

Charles de Lint is the modern master of urban fantasy Recorded Books and Blackstone Audio have released audiobooks for such Charle de Lint titles as The Wind in His Heart, The Mystery of Grace, The Onion Girl, Moonheart.

Charles de Lint is the modern master of urban fantasy. Folktale, myth, fairy tale, dreams, urban legend-all of it adds up to pure magic in de Lint's vivid, original world. No one does it better. Recorded Books and Blackstone Audio have released audiobooks for such Charle de Lint titles as The Wind in His Heart, The Mystery of Grace, The Onion Girl, Moonheart, Memory and Dream and Dreams Underfoot.

The leaves are coming down, another circle going round. When I got the news I cried and later realized. I’ll carry a part of you for all my life. Kiya Heartwood, from No Goodbyes, No Regrets. Night hovers all day in the boughs of the fir tree. Ralph Waldo Emerson, from Experience, 1844. Our dreams make us large. Jack Kirby, from an interview on Prisoners of Gravity, TV Ontario; broadcast January 7, 1993. The reading woman sits by the window, lamplight falling over her shoulder onto the book.

Talk about Memory and Dream


Mr_NiCkNaMe
Charles de Lint is perhaps and unsung visionary of modern fiction. In the mid-1980s, along with a handful of other authors like Emma Bull and Terri Wilding, he all but invented the modern urban fantasy genre before it was hijacked by vampires and werewolves thanks to Anne Rice, Mark Rein-Hagen and Stephanie Meyer. De Lint’s urban fantasy is a place of wonder where fairies and spirits hide out of the corner of your eye and conflicts are as much human problems as they are magical.

Despite having started his career writing about Toronto, Ontario De Lint’s more famous setting is a fictional city known as Newford which sits somewhere nebulously on the western side of the North American continent, but he never quite says whether it resides in the United States or Canada and most likely simply is in a nebulous way like so many other elements of fantasy. Among the early books in the series is Memory and Dream which displays both his already detailed worldbuilding along with a hint of immaturity of characterization.

Like many of de Lint’s stories he switches viewpoints and perspective, from first to third and back, as well as jumping through time – sometimes in the 1970s and other times in the present day of the early-1990s. The viewpoint characters are mainly Izzy Copely, or in the present Isabelle, and a friend named Alan Grant. A handful of other characters gain an occasional viewpoint chapter, but those two are the primary. Also, like de Lint’s other stories perspective is often first-person for specific characters and third for others.

The story follows Isabelle after having received a letter from her late best friend Kathy. Alan reminds Isabelle of her promise to illustrate Kathy’s books and he’s preparing a new collection of short stories. Isabelle is hesitant, but only foreshadows the reason why.
In the past Izzy, as a young college student moved from a family farm, studies to become an art student at Butler University in Newford. While sketching an eccentric and hideously ugly homeless man in a park he approaches her and judges her artwork as “good enough” and extends to her an invitation to study painting under him. He hands her a grubby business card marked, “Vincent Rushkin” a legendary painter in Newford who inspired Izzy to pursue art.

She takes him up on the offer, but finds his temperament as ugly as his appearance. Physically and psychologically abusive the first thing he has her do as a student is model nude for him to establish the power structure of their relationship. Later he becomes physically abusive, but immediately apologetic which leaves Izzy in a state of denial about the situation. For all his abuse, however, Rushkin truly has an amazing artistic ability to teach. Not a mundane style that could be copied into textbooks or made into videos, but a magical philosophy that allows the few with a gift to embody spirits in the image of their paintings.

It becomes quickly clear that Rushkin is not only the antagonist, but also the main character of the novel. Like Darth Vader in Star Wars, ever action the main characters take is in response to Rushkin moving first. This becomes more and more obvious as the story progresses and Izzy’s Numea, as she called the spirits, warn her of Rushkin’s treachery. Despite his often-benevolent demeanor Izzy learns he gains some kind of magical sustenance by consuming the Numea she brings across. The method is left unclear, but involves destroying the original canvas in a ritualistic fashion.

In the present-day Alan is a publisher trying to print Kathy’s, a mutual friend, short story collection to benefit a children’s home for disadvantages youths. Hampered by this is Kathy’s step-mother wanting to keep the late author’s fortune for her own. When the step-mother comes up murdered Alan is the first suspect, but is quickly dismissed as having motive but no other reason to be a suspect. This feeds into the overarching Rushkin plot, but to explain further would spoil the climax.

In the past Izzy paints Numea while trying to keep them safe from Rushkin’s mechanizations. Her roommate Kathy has a windfall of a large advance on her short story collection, which she uses to begin her foundation, while Izzy is having her own success selling her paintings of which the Numea take top dollar. In a dream she learns of Rushkin hunting them and eventually learns he’s been killing them to gain his eldritch nutrition. This reaches its climax during a party at her farm to celebrate Kathy’s foundation’s opening and ends in a massive fire of her family’s farmhouse. The loss in the fire leads to Isabelle radically changing her art style to prevent herself from producing any more Numea she could betray to Rushkin.
If there is an overarching theme to be found it is, in my opinion, the importance and fragility of trust. Izzy misplaces her trust in Rushkin leading to the death of her Numea. Likewise, her Numea’s trust in her to protect them even when she proves unable. Similarly, and like many of de Lint’s other novels, the importance of friendship and its place as a surrogate family for many people. Like many of de Lint’s characters Izzy and Kathy come from broken and abusive homes and their friends become a chosen family that’s a bond that proves the adage, “The blood of the covenant is stronger than the water of the womb.”

As a note, the Numea themselves are interesting and colorful characters and among them Cosette and John Sweetgrass play key roles in how the plot comes to a climax. John Sweetgrass is an American Indian who Izzy eventually becomes romantically involved with, but they split when she can’t resolve the reality of her having created him. Cosette is the subject of a painting called the “Wild Child” and comes across at times as both a naive young teenager, the hedonistic “wild child” of her painting’s title and an ageless immortal being. Her desire is to “have a red crow beat its wings in my chest” – a heartbeat and blood – and with it the ability to dream, both of which she considers important to being “real.”
Like de Lint’s other books Memory and Dream uses foreshadowing to make the twists obvious in hindsight but still not reveal the main climactic scene. The climax itself, while containing an interesting twist, doesn’t comes across as shocking as the reveal of a “cozy mystery” where the reader is left impressed the author outsmarted them, but not so shocked they felt betrayed by an act of deus ex machina.

Some of the characters that dominate de Lint’s other stories, like Jilly Coppercorn and Geordie Riddell, are present if in an immature form. For example, Jilly’s exuberance and penitence for a troubled youth is present, but she’s not the Jilly of The Onion Girl or Widdershins. Similarly the city of Newford itself feels more like a travel guide than a living city with only a handful of places that felt truly alive. Still, given its status as an early novel in the long-running and well-loved series it’s forgivable since the author was still learning about who and where he’s writing.

Overall, I’d say Memory and Dream would be a good entry point for a new reader into Charles de Lint’s Newford books. It doesn’t quite have the complexity and depth of Someplace to be Flying nor the kick-in-the-teeth heartbreak of The Onion Girl. Given its place within de Lint’s Newford mythology it’s a strong novel, but in the overall sweep of his career it’s more of a book for true fans.

Perhaps the worst part of the book is not the author’s fault, but the current market. In an urban fantasy landscape inspired more by White Wolf Games, B-movies and blatant Mary Sues a truly inspired story finds itself hard to stand out even given the Charles de Lint’s pedigree within the genre.
Danial
One of my all time favorite authors! I was loaned a copy when it first came out and have bought all of de Lint's books since. I'm glad I could finally find one of the last remaining new copies. His stories are so rich with characters, more than believable, I know Newford exists somewhere. He touches the soul of magic and makes one hungry for another feast. There are intense dark elements de Lint exposes, but always the gift of healing, a resolution, a transmutation happens in the most exquisite, poetic prose. I love the blend of Native American and Celtic cultures in his books. More than believable!
Nilasida
This book was my first introduction to the writings of Charles de Lint. I picked it up due to the cover art- yes, I chose the book because of its cover! Very glad I did. It's setting is the fictional city of Newford, and a young artist is the focal point of the story. Through her work, she uncovers magic in her world and it leads her to very unexpected and far away places. A fantasy, but a believable one. A fantasy with a modern take and spirit. An unforgettable one. I highly recommend Memory and Dream.
Uthergo
This is the first book I ever read by Charles de Lint, and it made me an instant and lifetime fan. It made me laugh, cry, cringe, applaud, and think, and so much more. What a storyteller Mr de Lint is! The characters have become permanent fixtures in my memory-universe. A fairy-tale set in the real, present world, it reminds me that magic does still exist, and it isn't all sparkly rainbows and cute puppies either, but it's hopeful and it's sad and it's oh so beautiful.
Arador
This is a wonderfully crafted novel. Very different from other fantasy tales that I have read. The characters are so believable that I find myself wondering if people I pass on the street might possibly be shapeshifters. I can't wait to read more of Mr. De Lint's work.
Pringles
Charles de Lint best writer brings your soul back to earth while sending your spirit to the stars
Alsanadar
At first when I was reading this I was wondering when the fantasy part of the story was going to happen. But I was pleasantly surprised at how he used the art to create his magic. I was completely drawn in. Loved it!
Rereading DeLint is a joy for me. This is at least my third or fourth time with this beautiful book, and I know I shall read it again. Begin at the beginning is my suggestion. You won’t be sorry!