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Download Playing with the Grown-ups ePub

by Sophie Dahl

Download Playing with the Grown-ups ePub
  • ISBN 0307388352
  • ISBN13 978-0307388353
  • Language English
  • Author Sophie Dahl
  • Publisher Anchor; Reprint edition (February 10, 2009)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats rtf doc lit lrf
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1892 kb
  • Size Fb2 1779 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 470

Kitty loves living at the isolated Hay House with her doting grandparents, but it cannot provide the adventure and excitement that her restless, bohemian mother Marina craves. When a guru sees Marina's future in New York, Kitty is torn from her home and bounced from place to place—first a colorless boarding school, then an American ashram, and finally back to an unfamiliar England. But soon, no god, man, or martini can staunch Marina's hunger for a happiness that proves all too elusive. And Kitty, turning fifteen, must choose: whether to play dangerous games with the grown-ups or put herself first. With this witty and poignant debut novel, Sophie Dahl ably carries on the literary legacy of her grandfather, the beloved children's book author Roald Dahl.

Playing with the Grown-ups. The man with the dancing eyes.

Playing with the Grown-ups. Playing with the Grown-ups. First published in Great Britain 2007.

Lucy Dahl On The New BFG Film And Growing Up in the World of Roald Dahl Lorraine . Страна: США. Безопасный режим: выкл.

Lucy Dahl On The New BFG Film And Growing Up in the World of Roald Dahl Lorraine - Продолжительность: 4:43 Lorraine Recommended for you. 4:43. 528Hz Tranquility Music For Self Healing & Mindfulness ➤ Love Yourself - Light Music For The Soul - Продолжительность: 3:00:06 Guild Of Light - Tranquility Music Recommended for you. 3:00:06. Playing with the Grown-Ups - Продолжительность: 3:50 Rosianna Halse Rojas Recommended for you. 3:50.

I grew up reading Roald Dahl's books as a wee nipper (and have been on a Dahl kick again of late in my late thirties), so was ecstatic when I came across a copy of Sophie Dahl's book, Playing with the Grown-ups recently. I really liked how this was written - it was unusual and quirky and quite unlike anything I've ever read before. It was like a bunch of snapshots or moments from someone's life rather than an actual narrative, yet you could still follow what was happening.

Playing with the Grown-ups grows beyond charming child's play to a clear-eyed compassion for the world's limitless . Sophie Dahl grew up in England

Playing with the Grown-ups grows beyond charming child's play to a clear-eyed compassion for the world's limitless store of tragic comedy. Sophie Dahl grew up in England. In 2003 she and the illustrator Anne Morris published a small book, The Man with the Dancing Eyes. She lives in the country in England.

She and Kitty were lying on the sofa watching Camelot. I think you should have a birthday party, a belated one. Christ knows, you and I could use a party. et, just Dylan and Honor. what if no one comes, and where will everyone fit?'. Those are just petty logistics - we'll make everyone fit. It'll be cosy and intimate. We must make the best of the space we have

The Independent Books. Dahl is at her best with this ballsy tragicomedy, which is genuine and touching in parts. She disappoints when she tries to be deep

The Independent Books. Kitty is a young girl growing up in a "somewhat" unconventional family: doting grandparents, two half-siblings and her mother, Marina, "a beauty, a painter and a weeper". It could be classic misery lit – mother ups sticks with "Swami-ji"; mother dumps bookish daughter in vile boarding school; mother returns and has shedloads of sex and drugs with mortified daughter's friends – apart from that Dahl doesn't seem to do misery. She disappoints when she tries to be deep. And in the present-day chapters, Kitty's supportive husband is too, too sick-making. Sophie Dahl writes with a keen eye, a warm heart and wonderful lyricism about a coming-of-age that's quite unlike any other. How did you like the book?

Playing With The Grown-Ups. Kitty's mother, Marina, is both utterly beguiling and terrifyingly embarrassing, and more often than not Kitty can only gaze on her antics with awe and toe-curling trepidation. But as Kitty grows up it becomes clear that perhaps Marina isn't the most exemplary of parents, and that sometimes a girl might have to put herself first. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

How can Sophie Dahl be the granddaughter of the genius Roald Dahl, a certified supermodel . Her first book, a fairy tale for adults called The Man With the Dancing Eyes, only whet my appetite for more and Playing With the Grown-Ups does not disappoint.

How can Sophie Dahl be the granddaughter of the genius Roald Dahl, a certified supermodel AND an amazing author? Well, it turns out that she's all three and you'll want to hate her for it but you can't. I read this book while sitting on my porch in the first sun of spring, smoking cigarettes and avoiding getting to work.

Hot Book - Model Child. Sophie Dahl spins the coming-of-age tale of Kitty, a young British girl whose life is ruled by her beautiful bohemian mother's whims in Playing With the Grown-ups. By Jenna Gabrial Gallagher. Mar 25 2008, 12:49 pm EDT. Advertisement - Continue Reading Below. More From Art, Books & Music.

About Playing with the Grown-ups With this witty and poignant debut novel, Sophie Dahl ably carries on the literary legacy of her grandfather, the beloved children’s book author Roald Dahl.

About Playing with the Grown-ups. Kitty loves living at the isolated Hay House with her doting grandparents, but it cannot provide the adventure and excitement that her restless, bohemian mother Marina craves. When a guru sees Marina’s future in New York, Kitty is torn from her home and bounced from place to place-first a colorless boarding school, then an American ashram, and finally back to an unfamiliar England. With this witty and poignant debut novel, Sophie Dahl ably carries on the literary legacy of her grandfather, the beloved children’s book author Roald Dahl. About Playing with the Grown-ups.

Talk about Playing with the Grown-ups


Мох
I found this story thoroughly engrossing and Sophie Dahl has a way of portraying characters that make them very believable and real. Plus she uses beautiful images.
Kefym
The story begins with the ever-dreaded phone call in the middle of the night, summoning Kitty to London because something's happened to her mother. Heavily pregnant herself, Kitty gets on the first flight, and, we think, starts the story from the beginning to demonstrate how she and her family got to the point where her mother lies in the hospital.

As a child, Kitty lived a somewhat idyllic life in the English countryside with her mother, brother, sister, aunts, grandparents, and nanny. Dahl vividly describes her setting, and one can almost feel the warmth of the sun and the breeze.

But Kitty is not destined to remain there. Kitty's mother, Marina, is presented to the reader as someone who does not make the best choices in life. Kitty herself is the product of an affair Marina had as a teenager with a married man. As the story begins, Marina has just found religion, through Swami-ji, the leader of an unnamed cult.

Though benevolent in intention, the effect of the cult on Kitty's family is dramatic. Soon, Kitty is separated from her family and sent to a drab boarding school, while her mother and siblings go to New York. Her mother becomes a successful painter in New York, and after a single school year, decides that Kitty should join her. She does, and it is in New York that Kitty first begins to follow her mother's example in walking on the wild side.

When the family moves back to London (having been rejected by the cult), Kitty's inhibitions seem to stay in New York. Once in London, she falls in with varying crowds, doing drugs, going to wild parties, and the like. From the loose time references we are given in the book, it is the mid-'90s and Kitty is about 14. Not to be overly naive, but she is far too young to be doing the sorts of things she does (I guess that's where the book gets its title), but even worse is that Marina encourages Kitty's behavior, sometimes even joining her at parties, and passing around the drugs. That Marina genuinely loves Kitty makes this picture even more tragic, as it does not ever seem to occur to Marina that her choices and behavior might be destructive to her children. Finally, Marina takes an overdose and is rushed to the hospital. Kitty calls her grandparents, and is finally able to return to their home.

But, although the scene has remained the same, Kitty herself has changed too much to stay there, and decides to go back to boarding school, this time in Connecticut, to make a new start. But here is where the book fails us. Having detailed Kitty's descent, Dahl leaves her redemption to our imagination. We know only that she does manage to make a stable life for herself. Having spent so much time in the dregs with Kitty, it would have been nice if we could have walked with her a bit on her journey up.
Crazy
Sophie Dahl's Playing With the Grown Ups begins in modern day New York, where Kitty is sleeping peacefully in bed with her husband. She then gets the dreaded middle-of-the-night phone call telling her that her mother, Marina, has been hospitalized for a nervous breakdown. Kitty takes the next flight to England and revisits the wild youth she has tried so desperately to escape.

Playing With the Grown Ups consists largely of Kitty's flashbacks. Her childhood was a mad dance of constant change, uncertainty, and her mother's never-ending search for meaning. Kitty was a normal girl until she moved to New York to be with her mother, whose Guru Swami-ji had told her to relocate and take up a career in painting. Kitty tried to act grown up too, wearing her mother's clothes, partying, and experimenting with sex and drugs. Kitty and her family became deeply involved in a Hindu-inspired commune led by Swami-ji and delved deeply into spirituality.

But their new life in New York is short lived. Swami-Ji tells the family to leave New York to avoid imminent "dark times." Marina moves her family to London to start over yet again, but there life became significantly worse. Kitty became involved in drugs and hanging out with the bad kids. By the time Kitty was 15, Marina was doing hard drugs with her daughter and nearly died in Kitty's arms of an overdose. Kitty decided then and there to stop playing "grown-up" and put herself and her future first. She moved back to the United States to start a new life at a boarding school in Connecticut.

This novel was thoroughly engaging. The constant whims of Marina were amusing and sad at the same time. She was a loving mother, but incredibly selfish as well. I wanted to strangle Marina and tell her to put her children's needs before her own. It was frustrating to see how lost the woman was and what a foul influence she was on her children. What sort of mother serves drugs at her daughter's party? Kitty grew up in chaos and experimented with the dark side of life along the way. I felt sorry for her as she struggled to find herself and relieved when she found her way out of her dead-end lifestyle. Had she not, she may have been the one in the hospital from a nervous breakdown instead of Marina. I loved Dahl's fictional memoir format and the detail she put into the storyline. She made a story that could have been dull and depressing a comic read that's hard to put down. I only wish this novel was longer. You'll be touched by Kitty's bravery and strength as she overcomes obstacles and grows into an independent young woman as well.

by Jennifer Melville
for Story Circle Book Reviews
reviewing books by, for, and about women
MarF
This novel tells the life experiences of a young girl (Kitty) on the cusp of adulthood and her self-destructive "mummy" Marina. It is a beautifully written coming-of-age tale which develops quite a gritty sting in the latter half while describing Kitty's teen years. Throughout the story we read about Kitty's idyllic life in the country with her grandparents, mummy, aunts, siblings and nanny, her stay at boarding schools, the moving back and forth between England and the U.S., her friendships, drugs, alcohol, sex, and just the wildness of it all. Yet, I enjoyed this even when it became a little harrowing.

I found the ending a bit disappointing. After all that we went through with Kitty, it just leaves you to imagine what she has to overcome in order to lead a better life. You obviously know that she was able to overcome her mother's influence and eventually make a life for herself in New York, but you just don't read how she was able to do it (you know this from the first chapter - so I'm not giving anything away). It would have been nice to read how she was able to get herself out of the hole she was in and better herself and her life.

Moving, well-written, tender-hearted coming of age/mother-daughter relationship story. Utterly charming and I couldn't help wondering if some parts were autobiographical. I think anybody who had a slightly unconventional childhood will be able to relate to this in some way.

And just in case you were wondering, Sophie Dahl is Roald Dahl's granddaughter.