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Download Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age ePub

by Lawrence Block

Download Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age ePub
  • ISBN 0312930925
  • ISBN13 978-0312930929
  • Language English
  • Author Lawrence Block
  • Publisher Tor Books; 1st edition (September 1, 1988)
  • Pages 345
  • Formats txt doc mobi docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1830 kb
  • Size Fb2 1582 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 826

Guthrie embarks on an odyssey from his Oregon home eastward, drawing fellow pilgrims--including the murderous Mark--into their own journeys of discovery

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Lawrence Block is best known for his fine detective fiction. I'm not a big fan of the genre, but picked up this book anyway because it promised something different. As he hikes through Oregon with only a day-pack, he gradually gains a following. An assortment of figures join him for reasons they cannot exactly explain. Each walks away from his or her life in exchange for the freedom of a different kind of journey.

Random Walk is a 1988 novel by Lawrence Block. It was first published by Tor Books. One day, Guthrie Wagner hears a voice telling him to abandon his life and go for a walk. He does so, and is soon joined by other similarly-inspired "walkers", who all begin to develop superpowers and experience miracles. Critical reception of Random Walk was poor.

Items related to Random Walk: A Novel for a New Ag. Lawrence Block's crime fiction ranges from the urban noir of Matthew Scudder to the urbane effervescence of Bernie Rhodenbarr.

Items related to Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age. Lawrence Block Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age. ISBN 13: 9780312930929. Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age. Lawrence Block. A Mystery Writers of America Grand Master, he is a multiple winner of the Edgar, Shamus, and Maltese Falcon awards. His published works include 50 novels, three short story collections, and four books on writing. From Publishers Weekly

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two long-running New York–set series about the recovering alcoholic . Matthew Scudder and the gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr

Lawrence Block (born June 24, 1938) is an American crime writer best known for two long-running New York–set series about the recovering alcoholic . Matthew Scudder and the gentleman burglar Bernie Rhodenbarr. Block was named a Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1994. Lawrence Block was born June 24, 1938 in Buffalo, New York, where he was raised. Block attended Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, but left before graduating.

Author: Lawrence Block Series: Matthew Scudder Novels, Book . Ever since The Burglar on the Prowl climbed the bestseller lists, fans have been clamoring for a new book featuring the lighthearted and lightfingered Bernie Rhodenbarr. More info →. The adventures of evan tanner.

Author: Lawrence Block Series: Matthew Scudder Novels, Book 2. Matthew Scudder is no conscientious avenging angel. In the Midst of Death.

ALSO BY LAWRENCE OSBORNE Bangkok Days The Naked Tourist The Accidental Connoisseur American . I feel like going for a walk.

ALSO BY LAWRENCE OSBORNE Bangkok Days The Naked Tourist The Accidental Connoisseur American Normal The Poisoned Embrace Paris Dreambook Ania Malina This is a work o. Let’s get coffee up at the kasbah, no? The waiters here are making me feel gloomy. What kind of new book after all? Instead, she was beginning to feel boxed in by the schedule to which they had to stick, and the men in the street stared and stared and their hands played with rosaries on the surfaces of the tables. They stared so hard she felt her center of gravity giving way.

Coauthors & Alternates.

Time to murder and create: a matt scudder mystery. ISBN 9780752834627 (978-0-7528-3462-7) Softcover, ORION, 1999. Coauthors & Alternates. Learn More at LibraryThing. BLOCK,LAWRENCE at LibraryThing.

This is a book designed to help you write a novel. It contains the distillation of my own experience of twenty years as a published novelist, plus a considerable amount that I’ve learned from other writers. My goal throughout has been to produce the sort of book I might have found useful when I set out to write my own first novel. But there are no guarantees.

Books, Comics & Magazines. Books Lawrence Block. Title: A Walk Among The Tombstones Item Condition: used item in a good condition. Author: Lawrence Block ISBN 10: 1857970624. Skip to page navigation. Small Town: A Novel Of New York by Block, Lawrence Paperback Book The Cheap Fast.

Talk about Random Walk: A Novel for a New Age


Ndav
I've read almost all of his books, and Lawrence Block has never written a story like this. The juxtaposition of Good and Evil--and the challenge to my notions and values--left me at times breathless and at times terribly disturbed. The world and characters portrayed left me wondering: why it is I could so easily believe people could be that evil, yet I had such difficulty believing people could be so good. Why is it easy to accept life would be that cruel, yet so hard to accept that life could be so miraculous? Which body of attitudes would it be more advantageous for me to embrace? Block got me to thinking....
Gelgen
I was hoping for a little more substance. Quick read. Starts out interesting but then it loses me.
Gravelblade
How can an author who so thoroughly explores the good in his villains, as well as the villainy of his leading characters; who swims through the murky waters of motive and choice, grinning all the while, not give in and present us with a parable of our own absurdity - and salvation?

Thank you very much, Mr. Block, for making this gem available as an e-book, and for bringing it to my attention in your book, Afterwords.
Andromathris
Not your typical Lawrence Block. Amazing storyteller...
inetserfer
Lawrence Block is a great writer and, in his autobiography, Step by Step, he says that this is one of his favorite books and that he wrote it in a burst of energy in two weeks straight. Unfortunately, only the latter makes sense. This just isn't a very good book.

It is severely handicapped by a completely absurd line of silly mystic mumbo-jumbo that propels its characters on their "walk." They are boring because there is no conflict. They join the walk, they experience a miracle cure, they all get along. The other half of the book is from the point of view of a prolific serial killer. He is not boring, but he sure is super creepy, so much so that it's hard to enjoy the book.

The Kindle formatting is fine, no issues.

Skip this one unless you are a New Age loon, a serial killer, or a Block completist.
hardy
The serial killers murders were too gruesome and much too descriptive!!!
Funny duck
Lawrence Block is best known for his fine detective fiction. I'm not a big fan of the genre, but picked up this book anyway because it promised something different. In the back matter, Block indicated that fans either loved it or hated it, but it remained one of his personal favorites. I was intrigued. I had no idea what lay in store.
The plot line (if you can even call it that) is simple. Bartender Guthrie, prompted by an inner voice, decides to shuck the rather bland and pointless life he's been living and go on walkabout. He literally walks away from his job, his apartment, his car, and his possessions. As he hikes through Oregon with only a day-pack, he gradually gains a following. An assortment of figures join him for reasons they cannot exactly explain. Each walks away from his or her life in exchange for the freedom of a different kind of journey.
Early on, Guthrie meets Sara, a psychotherapist going rapidly blind from some condition unknown to medicine. As her outer vision constricts and finally disappears altogether, however, her inner vision opens wide. She's guided to leave her home in Indiana and travel west (with her 13 year-old son), arriving in a small Oregon town and parking herself at a specific motel a day before Guthrie and his new companion saunter up the road. Sara becomes the group's blind prophetess.
As the growing band of itinerants make their way through Oregon, Idaho, Montana, and onward, they find that their walking results in the healing of old medical ailments and addictions. Psychological wounds of all kinds surface in bouts of tears, rage, or emotional paralysis, to be cleared through breathwork. Miracles abound.
But another plot line weaves through that of the beatific walkers. Mark is a rather bland, simple guy--a husband and father--who's made millions by buying up decrepit properties in foreclosure en masse and renting them out for income. And oh yeah, he gets off on killing women. Lots of women. He decides to take the summer off and go on a killing spree. While the walkers make their way slowly eastward on foot, shedding their possessions and guided only by Guthrie's intuition, Mark drives his Lincoln randomly about the Midwest, ostensibly to accumulate more property that he doesn't need, but in truth scouting out women who attract him in order to kill them. The murders are described in graphic, near clinical detail. They are very hard to stomach and would have been unreadable (and a reason to trash the book) were it not for the counterpoint of the walkers. As the walkers numbers swell to over one hundred, Mark's body count rises in tandem.
In this way, the book showcases two models for the accumulation of power, one centered around communality and love, the other lust and fear. The proponents of these models are clearly destined to collide at some point, and indeed they do, with results that might disappoint and even anger some, but which are wholly consistent with the story's central premise. No big twists or surprises here, except for a key insight into the seeds of Mark's murderous passion.
Random Walk cobbles together many tropes of `New Age' thinking--energetic healing, holotropic breathwork, inner voices, vision quests, the principles of A Course in Miracles, even ironically the Mayan 2012 prophecies. These are offered up so matter-of-factly that I can understand why one Amazon reviewer saw the book as a parody. Some miracles are indeed over-the-top (e.g. the perfect weather and the walkers near invisibility to law enforcement). The inner voice thing could have come off as silly if handled by a lesser writer, but Block knows enough to keep it minimal and unobtrusive. And yes, Sara's disquisitions become a bit preachy and tedious at times: too much holistic info-dump. But Random Walk is not parody. The characters are too real, too serious. And Block's metaphysical knowledge runs too deep. (He quotes directly from A Course in Miracles in at least one instance and paraphrases it several more times.) More significantly, the emotions sparked by the twin story lines are too raw, too heartfelt to be satirical. There's real conviction here and I found it both compelling and moving.
This is not really a novel in any conventional sense of the word. There is no conflict apart from the juxtaposition of good and evil. There is no true protagonist. The characters do grow, but only in service to the overarching theme and not as a result of their interactions at the level of personality. No, the book is better regarded as an extended parable, a modern day Bible story. Think Exodus, (Sara mentions the burning bush) with the Hebrews freed from their oppression in Egypt and wandering on foot through the wilderness toward some Promised Land as yet unknown to them, guided by divine providence in the figure of Moses. In this sense, like Exodus, Random Walk recounts a spiritual journey. (I admit my bias here: I did after all write a book, From Plagues to Miracles: The Transformational Journey of Exodus, from the Slavery of Ego to the Promised Land of Spirit, that views Exodus as a roadmap for the spiritual journey.) Random Walk is also a cautionary tale about the dangers facing humankind, and an inspiring portrait of the nature of true healing, how it has no limits except those we impose on ourselves by our own blinkered systems of belief.
If you're skeptical of all phenomena that can't be neatly measured and reproduced in a lab, or if you find the idea of a spiritual reality beyond the realm of the five senses to be anathema, then Random Walk is not a book for you. Pass it by. But if you have felt the tug of unseen guidance in your life, if you've had miraculous encounters that can't be explained by so-called rational means, if you know in your heart that there must be a better way--then drop whatever you're doing and start walking. Join the journey. Read this little treasure of a book.