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Download Faces in the Moon (American Indian Literature Critical Studies Series) ePub

by Betty Louise Bell

Download Faces in the Moon (American Indian Literature  Critical Studies Series) ePub
  • ISBN 0806126019
  • ISBN13 978-0806126012
  • Language English
  • Author Betty Louise Bell
  • Publisher Univ of Oklahoma Pr (April 1, 1994)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats azw rtf lit docx
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1190 kb
  • Size Fb2 1235 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 968

"As my grandmother was dying, she told my mother, then nine years old, that she would always be watching her from the moon. And throughout her childhood, my mother sat on her back porch and waited for her mother's face to appear in the moon. Sometimes she saw it clear and defined, and she went to bed happy."Faces in the Moon is the story of three generations of Cherokee women, as viewed by the youngest, Lucie, a woman who has been able to use education and her imagination to escape the confines of her rootless, impoverished upbringing. When her mother's illness summons her back to Oklahoma, Lucie finds herself confronted with the legacy of a childhood she has worked hard to separate from her adult self.Her mother, Gracie, and her maternal aunt, Auney are members of the Cherokees' "lost generation," women who rejected the traditional rural ways in search of a more glamorous life as autonomous working women. With tragic irony, Gracie and Auney do not recognize that white America has exploited and rejected them, nor do they understand why. In foolish pursuit of the American dream, they have lost the respect of their own people without earning the respect of mainstream society.For the girl Lucie, being an Indian means living in a shack near Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where her mother works in a restaurant, and trying to cope with the succession of men who enter and leave her mother's house. Her understanding changes when, at a low point in Gracie's life, Lucie is sent to live with her great aunt Lizzie, a stern farm and "full-blooded" woman who reveals to Lucie the existence of alternatives to her mother's uprooted ways of living.Throughout the novel, Bell has woven together the sounds of women's voices, telling and retelling stories, explaining and speculating, comforting and seeking comfort. From this piece of her own family history, and from the voices of those women as they preserved that history and imbued their own lives with meaning through the retelling of tales, Bell has fashioned a first novel of impressive emotional power.

Faces in the Moon makes a major contribution to American literature and gives us a rare and important insight into love between daughter and mother.

Faces in the Moon makes a major contribution to American literature and gives us a rare and important insight into love between daughter and mother. Bell, herself a Cherokee, deeply understands the culture she writes about and conveys that understanding, unobtrusively, yet with great emotional power. As my grandmother was dying, she told my mother, then nine years old, that she would always be watching her from the moon. And throughout her childhood, my mother sat on her back porch and waited for her mother's face to appear in the moon. Sometimes she saw it clear and defined, and she went to bed happy".

Betty Louise Bell, a Cherokee mixed-blood born in Oklahoma, received her P. from Ohio State University and now teaches courses in English, American studies, and women's studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Библиографические данные. Faces in the Moon American Indian literature and critical studies series (Том 9). Автор.

Betty Louise Bell is an American author and educator. Bell was born on November 23, 1949, in Davis, Oklahoma. She is a scholar and fiction writer of Cherokee ancestry. She earned her PhD in 1985 from Ohio State University

Betty Louise Bell is an American author and educator. She earned her PhD in 1985 from Ohio State University. Bell is a former director of the Native American Studies Program and former assistant professor of American culture, English, and Women's Studies at the University of Michigan.

In Betty Louise Bell's Faces in the Moon she takes a Native American story away from the stereotypes, creating a. .

In Betty Louise Bell's Faces in the Moon she takes a Native American story away from the stereotypes, creating a narrative of the struggle of Cherokee women. Her story beautifully weaves the themes of poverty, self-identity, and tradition through a spiral of time and character. The narrator, Lucie, revisits the memories of her life while facing the impending death of her mother. Betty Louise Bell has exposed personal and cultural demons of her protagonist with this novel which explores the pain of childhood and the value of family and cultural heroes. She defys the stereotypes of twentieth century Native Americans, often represented in the novels of some popular Indian writers.

Faces in the Moon book. Faces In The Moon introduces the reader to generations of women within one Native American family and explores the varied feelings between them regarding their culture

Faces in the Moon book. Faces In The Moon introduces the reader to generations of women within one Native American family and explores the varied feelings between them regarding their culture. While some of the women completely embrace their heritage, others are uncomfortable with it, preferring to present themselves in a more Caucasian way, at least in public. One woman, Gracie, tries to disguise her Native American features by dying her hair blonde, shaving her eyebrows down, drawing them back in.

by Betty Louise Bell. Published September 1995 by University of Oklahoma Press.

Encyclopedia of American Indian Literature, Eds. Jennifer McClinton-Temple and Alan Velie, 2007. S. Martínez-Falquina. Download pdf. Close.

The term the dark side of the Moon is usually taken to mean the side that always faces away from Earth-which was dark in the sense that nothing was known about it prior to the space age.

Cite this publication. Silvia Martinez-Falquina. The term the dark side of the Moon is usually taken to mean the side that always faces away from Earth-which was dark in the sense that nothing was known about it prior to the space age. This led to all manner of speculations-both fictional and non-fictional-and some of the more interesting ones are described in this chapter. In a more literal sense, the dark side of the Moon is the side. away from the Sun-which is where the Earth is during a solar eclipse.

Studies in American Indian Literatures, Volume 25, pp 86-106; doi:10. Keywords: Narrative Healing, Betty Louise, Louise Bell's, Bell's Faces, Moon.

Informationen zum Titel Faces in the Moon von Betty Louise Bell aus der Reihe American Indian Literature . Indians of North America, Literature – Classics, Modern fiction, Native American Novel & Short Story In English, Oklahoma, Popular American Fiction, USA. related products.

Informationen zum Titel Faces in the Moon von Betty Louise Bell aus der Reihe American Indian Literature and Critical Studies Indians of North America, Literature – Classics, Modern fiction, Native American Novel & Short Story In English, Oklahoma, Popular American Fiction, USA.

Talk about Faces in the Moon (American Indian Literature Critical Studies Series)


Teonyo
Excellent book to read
Zavevidi
The book is in excellent condition. Thanks for hooking me up, my friend. Have a good one! Thanks again. Ash
Qusicam
Faces In The Moon introduces the reader to generations of women within one Native American family and explores the varied feelings between them regarding their culture. While some of the women completely embrace their heritage, others are uncomfortable with it, preferring to present themselves in a more Caucasian way, at least in public. One woman, Gracie, tries to disguise her Native American features by dying her hair blonde, shaving her eyebrows down, drawing them back in. She believes this looks more womanly than her natural look. Her fixation on her looks seeps into her relationship with her daughter, Lucie. Lucie sadly takes a lot of heat from her mom, having to endure statements like "You're plain... better be smart."

Lucie also battles harsh treatment from her mother's revolving door of boyfriends -- some alcoholic, some abusive. When Gracie becomes deeply involved with one man in particular, the man moves in and things almost instantly become tense between him and Lucie. Not only does Gracie's white boyfriend express racist sentiments toward Lucie, but there is also subtext that suggests that some sort of sexual assault might have been carried out on Lucie. Eventually the boyfriend makes the ultimatum that either Lucie has to leave or he will, so Gracie packs up Lucie and takes her to live with Great-Aunt Lizzie. All the way to Lizzie's house, Gracie is berating her daughter (as well as drinking while driving, btw -- class act, that one) -- cursing Lucie for her "selfish" behavior, telling her, "all you had to do was be nice to him... well, your days of milk and honey are over.."

Lizzie and her husband, Uncle Jerry, live out on a farm where, for what seems like the first time in Lucie's life, Lucie is able to sleep in a real bed rather than a pallet on the floor, as well as get solid meals and clean clothes every day without fail, not to mention just the overall safe environment a rural farm provides, compared to what Lucie was coming from! Funny thing is, Lucie is surprised to realize that even with all this, she still misses her mom.

The first part of the story focuses on these early years. Later on it fast forwards into present time when Lucie is now a grown woman and literature professor, embarrassed to ever be reminded of her mother's 3rd grade education. Lucie is called back home when her mom has to be hospitalized for a lengthy time. When not sitting with her mother in the hospital, Lucie spends time at her mom's house, taking care of the place and thinking back on the traumas and heartaches of years past, reflecting on how far things have come.

While this story might not have been the most exciting as far as plot action goes, I did think it was good as a general character study kind of look into the intricacies of a family, how we can't choose our genetic families and how some of us seriously pull short straw when it comes to ideal home situations, but how we can also dedicate ourselves to doing the best for our own lives. Finding ways to make peace with life's disappointments, acknowledging the blessings, however small they might seem.

As far as specific characters that spoke to me, I think my favorite was Uncle Jerry. Gotta love that he seemed so unruffled by life, one of those unwavering optimists that could easily find joy and humor in nearly anything. Given what Lucie was struggling with in her mind and home life, I think he was the perfect balm to keep her sane and grounded during a really challenging time. Also, given that I have Native American heritage myself, I did enjoy all the jokes made about the dangers of angering a Native woman (the NA women making the jokes themselves, btw) -- "Ain't nobody meaner than an Indian woman that's been crossed."
SING
In Betty Louise Bell's Faces in the Moon she takes a Native American story away from the stereotypes, creating a narrative of the struggle of Cherokee women. Her story beautifully weaves the themes of poverty, self-identity, and tradition through a spiral of time and character. The narrator, Lucie, revisits the memories of her life while facing the impending death of her mother. Because Faces in the Moon, is largely autobiographical, it is obvious through the emotion that Bell is able to draw out detail and layers through her storytelling.
Bell uses the development of character to explore the themes in her book. She uses the character Gracie, mother of the narrator, to demonstrate the theme of poverty. Gracie overcompensates where she can as an effect of her life in poverty. When Lucie reflects back on her wedding this is demonstrated, "She came to my wedding. She stepped our to f the cab dressed for the event, a tea-length multilayered turquoise chiffon, her hair freshly peroxided and tightly permed. Her shoes and purse had, obviously, not taken the first dye and were now in the `anyone's guess' color scheme" (Bell 49). She then goes on to explain how Gracie spoke loudly of her Cherokee mother while shoveling shrimp into her purse.
That scene also demonstrates the characterization of Lucie and the identity she is trying to escape. When her mom shows up at the wedding she represents all that Lucy is trying to run away from, poverty and being Cherokee. The only time Lucie seems to be comfortably in touch with her native self is when she is around her Great Aunt Lizzie. Lizzie represents a traditional foundation and encompasses native ways through story telling and her opinions. She doesn't hide her Indian self, and therefore makes her home a safe place for Lucie to come and embrace her own Indian self.
The characterizations of the main characters and secondary characters such as the abusive boyfriend of Gracie, J.D., and the pesky landlady Mabel, are layered into the story through the use of a circular/spiral form of story telling. By using a non-linear method of storytelling Bell effectively captures not only the reality of life, but also celebrates a traditional way of Native American storytelling. Bell takes the main character and shows the different places she has been in life through flashbacks, fantasy, and real time description.
Because of the autobiographical nature of the book her personal connection to the story is quite apparent in the details that reveal the author's passion. It is though the fine details of the book such as capturing language of the time and place, descriptive detail of the characters, and the raw association to plot, that her passion is revealed. She captured the difficulties of growing up poor in a time where there was no advocate for Native Americans much less a female Cherokee child who is abused. The passion is felt regarding these issues in such a way that takes reader often out of their comfort zone. This is discomfort is necessary to fully understand the emotion of the author's story.
Faces in the Moon, is a real Cherokee story. One cannot read it and expect to get a romanticized version of a Native American life complete with feathered dances and the baking of bread. Instead the reader is taken out of their comfort zone to understand the life of one Cherokee woman dealing with poverty, self-identity and traditions. When reading Faces in the Moon prepare to be moved to the point of tears, laughter, and an appreciation of Betty Louise Bell's masterful storytelling.
Works Cited
Bell, Betty Louise, Faces in the Moon. University of Oklahoma: Norman. 1994.