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Download Saratoga Haunting: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery ePub

by Stephen Dobyns

Download Saratoga Haunting: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery ePub
  • ISBN 0670845817
  • ISBN13 978-0670845811
  • Language English
  • Author Stephen Dobyns
  • Publisher Viking (July 1, 1993)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats lrf txt docx lit
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory United States
  • Size ePub 1872 kb
  • Size Fb2 1710 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 354

Streetwise private eye Charlie Bradshaw must face two crimes from his past that suddenly resurface, as well as a commitment ultimatum from his longtime companion, Janie. By the author of Body Traffic. 15,000 first printing. $15,000 ad/promo.

All the books have the word "Saratoga" in the title.

Dobyns has written many detective stories about a private detective named Charlie Bradshaw who works out of Saratoga Springs in upstate New York. Bradshaw is unusual as a private eye protagonist, an ordinary man who was once a police officer. All the books have the word "Saratoga" in the title.

Saratoga Haunting: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery. Saratoga Snapper: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery. Saratoga Backtalk: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. Saratoga Haunting: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery. Saratoga Fleshpot: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery.

Stephen Dobyns was born on February 19, 1941, in Orange, New Jersey . in 1964 from Wayne State University and an . in 1967 from the University of Iowa. His books of poetry include Concurring Beasts, Heat Death, Common Carnage, Pallbearers Envying the One Who Rides, The Porcupine's Kisses, and Winter's Journey. He has received several awards including the Melville Cane Award for Cemetery Nights. His novels include Saratoga Haunting, The Wrestler's Cruel Study, Saratoga Fleshpot, The Church of Dead Girls, and Boy in the Water.

Saratoga Haunting book. Everyman detective Charlie Bradshaw finds an old case coming back to haunt him in his seventh mystery in Saratoga Springs. Everyman detective Charlie Bradshaw finds an old case coming back. When a convict Charlie sent down some two decades earlier is paroled, death threats start arriving, while the skull of a woman who supposedly fled to South America shows up on a building site, drawing the detective back to his old case. Meanwhile, girl Everyman detective Charlie Bradshaw finds an old case coming back to haunt him in his seventh mystery in Saratoga Springs.

Charlie Bradshaw returns in a new Saratoga racetrack mystery

Charlie Bradshaw returns in a new Saratoga racetrack mystery. Where is Stephen Dobyns? By Thriftbooks. com User, April 11, 2006. This book is hilarious and wonderful! Why, oh why won't Dobyns be more prolific with this series? 0.

Everyman detective Charlie Bradshaw finds an old case coming back to haunt him in his seventh mystery in Saratoga Springs. When a convict Charlie sent down some two decades earlier is paroled, death threats start arriving, while the skull of a woman who supposedly fled to South America shows up on a building site, drawing the detective back to his old case

Narrated by: Michael Behrens. A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery, Book 5. By: Stephen Dobyns. Charlie Bradshaw returns in a new Saratoga racetrack mystery.

Narrated by: Michael Behrens. Series: Charlie Bradshaw, Book 7. Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins. Categories: Mysteries & Thrillers, Modern Detective. Narrated by: Michael Behrens. A man Charlie helped convict 20 years ago has been paroled from prison and is sending Charlie vicious death threats.

Talk about Saratoga Haunting: A Charlie Bradshaw Mystery


Gribandis
The Saratoga stories follow the life and times of Charlie Bradshaw, a Saratoga policeman of 20 years in the first one, who eventually resigns from the force and becomes a private detective. Charlie is a likeable man, and it is easy to care about what happens to him. Other characters are eccentric, bull-headed, flamboyant, shifty, criminal, caring greedy or stupid, as fits the story, but always interesting.
These books develop Charlie's story across the series, as well as each being a stand-alone mystery. I think it is best to start with the first one and move through them in order, although you could pick one up part way through the series without becoming confused. I don't think these books set the world on fire, but they keep you engaged and interested to the end, and leave you feeling like the world is not such a bad place, in spite of some of the bad things that happen in it.
This book involves Charlie revisiting an old case, which it turns out he got very wrong, when the skull of a woman turns up on a construction site. The woman disappeared 20 years earlier, shortly after embezzling a lot of money from the company she worked for. The investigating officer at the time - Charlie - decided she had run off to South America with a lover, and the case was effectively closed until her remains turned up. Revisiting his case notes, Charlie finds himself bemused at his meanness and prejudice and spends quite a lot of time ruminating about the kind of person he was then. As another review said, this book is quite philosophical, but I liked it, especially Charlie's conversation with his ex-wife about the past, and how we can all view ourselves and situations differently over time. I thought the bad guy was pretty easy to spot, so there wasn't a lot of mystery but it was an interesting read, nevertheless.
Honeirsil
A trope-busting tale of an Everyman private detective who can solve a present-day crime only by reconciling the facts with the incorrect assumptions he made as a desperately unhappy cop two decades before. Charlie Bradshaw is flawed but real, leavened by the cheerful obnoxiousness of sidekick Victor Plotz and the good-hearted goofiness of operative Eddie Gillespie, and ultimately his stubbornness and his human growth carries him through. The seventh of ten in a series of superb crime novels set in Saratoga. Would that there were more.
Broadcaster
This series is terrific and I do not understand why Dobyns and his detective Charlie Bradshaw are not much more well known. This issue of the series is especially strong and works an interesting angle. When a body turns up from an unsolved case Charlie "screwed up" 18 years ago turns up under Jacko's Pool Hall in Saratoga Springs, Charlie takes on the case. In the process he confronts the mistakes made by his younger self.

Charlie is a fascinating lead character and the book is populated with believable and sometimes hilarious secondary characters.

I lived in the area in the 1970s and can attest to the fact that Dobyns gets the scene and times right.
Breder
This one was a head-scratcher for me. I like Dobyns's writing a lot: The Church of Dead Girls was an amazing read, Boy in the Water a little less so, but still competently done. Dobyns has a special talent with atmosphere; he can paint a scene or the attitude of a character with just a few simple sentences, and the few shining moments of Saratoga Haunting are when Dobyns treats us to descriptions of aging hotels, the flavor of old town main streets, and forest lakes.

But 'Haunting had me stymied. It feels like it was written over a long weekend. The action and the internal monologues seem to repeat themselves, with only slight variations, sometimes three or four times. I understand the value of this kind of repetition, especially for the kinds of suspenseful build-ups that Dobyns is so good at. But some of these iterations seemed to lack any meaning. Charlie's self-recriminations over a dismal younger self got old after the third time; I wanted to say "we got it...move on, Charlie!" The dialog was also stilted at times and the minor ending (i.e., the caves and reward money) seemed to come out of the blue. The sub-plots coud be distracting at times.

A decent effort, but I plan to read the entire Saratoga series and hope to find Charlie in more cohesive shape than in this one. If you liked Haunting, however, by all means pick up The Church of Dead Girls...a better book by far.
Faugami
Charlie Bradshaw, a PI, likes a life without interference. His friend Victor does not. Charlie's desire for freedom arises from his twenty years on the police force. A divorced man, Charlie has a friend, Janey Burris. Charlie goes to the police stations to look up the files on an old case of his because a body has been found on the construction site for a new library.

The case had been closed as a missing persons case in the first instance. Reading his old notes, Charlie discerns that he had used a moral grid in working the case. He is tormented by something he calls the ambiguity of experience. Revisiting the old scenes, he is told by someone that shy people have a lot of anger. Investigating the case makes Charlie aware of his younger self. He questions his previous judgments and perceptions.

This book is thoughtful verging on the philosophical. It doesn't have that typical American brassiness. It resembles the novels and stories of Agatha Christie.
Hi_Jacker
Dobyns is amazing. Here he continues a mystery series with a fine novel that is better by far than some "literary" novels getting raves in THE NEW YORK TIMES. I don't understand why he is not better known.
Ffyan
This book is hilarious and wonderful! Why, oh why won't Dobyns be more prolific with this series?