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Download The Girl with the Golden Eyes and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by Peter Collier,Patrick Coleman,Honoré de Balzac

Download The Girl with the Golden Eyes and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics) ePub
  • ISBN 0199571287
  • ISBN13 978-0199571284
  • Language English
  • Author Peter Collier,Patrick Coleman,Honoré de Balzac
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2013)
  • Pages 176
  • Formats docx lit txt mobi
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory World Literature
  • Size ePub 1401 kb
  • Size Fb2 1226 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 512

Sexual attraction, artistic insight, and the often ironic relationship between them are the dominant themes in the three short works by Balzac collected in this volume. In Sarrasine, an impetuous young sculptor falls in love with a diva of the Roman stage, but rapture turns to rage when he discovers the reality behind the seductiveness of the singer's voice. The ageing artist in The Unknown Masterpiece, obsessed with his creation of the perfect image of an ideal woman, tries to hide it from the jealous young student who is desperate for a glimpse of it. And in The Girl with the Golden Eyes, the hero is a dandy whose attractiveness for the mysterious Paquita has an unexpected origin. These enigmatic and disturbing forays into the margins of madness, sexuality, and creativity show Balzac spinning fantastic tales as profound as any of his longer fictions. This volume is the only edition to bring these three great Balzac novellas together in one book, and it is the first paperback collection to include Sarrasine. Patrick Coleman's Introduction builds on the latest scholarship to help the reader appreciate the connections between notions of gender and the aesthetic explorations of nineteenth-century French romanticism and realism. The edition also includes thorough notes which explain all important cultural and political references.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Honoré de Balzac (Author), Peter Collier (Author), Patrick Coleman (Author) & 0 more.

Honoré de Balzac (Author), Peter Collier (Author), Patrick Coleman (Author) & 0 more. ISBN-13: 978-0199571284. Sarrasine is a wondrous tale of a young sculptor who falls in love with a singer who is shrouded in mystery (covering music & sculpture). The Unknown Masterpiece is a fascinating tale of the creation of great painting through the interaction of three painters in discussion and act - one young, one middle-aged and established, the third old & experienced). The tale also (sort of) predicts cubism.

Oxford World's Classics. These enigmatic and disturbing forays into the margins of madness, sexuality, and creativity are among the great works of nineteenth-century fiction.

Paperback, Oxford World's Classics, 192 pages. Published December 1st 2012 by Oxford University Press (first published 1835). Enjoyable story, which will serve as an introduction to Balzac's The History of the Thirteen as Henri de Marsay is also a character in that work.

Honore de Balzac (author), Peter Collier (translator). Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more Added to basket.

Peter Collier has previously translated Zola's Germinal for Oxford World's Classics.

Find nearly any book by Patrick Coleman. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. How to Scare Someone to Death: Thirteen True Ghost Stories. ISBN 9781604744842 (978-1-60474-484-2) Softcover, PublishAmerica, 2008. Find signed collectible books: 'How to Scare Someone to Death: Thirteen True Ghost Stories'.

Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, helpful notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more. Country of Publication. Translated by. Peter Collier.

2012 Серия: Oxford World's Classics Язык: ENG Размер: 196 x 131 x 12 Читательская аудитория: General (us: trade) Рейтинг: Поставляется из: Англии Описание: The three short fictions in this unique collection, Sarrasine, The Unknown Masterpiece, and The Girl with the Golden Eyes, deal with the relationship between artistic ideals and sexual desires. They show Balzac& mastery of the seductions of storytelling, and are among the 19th century& richest explorations of life and art. Дополнительное описание

Talk about The Girl with the Golden Eyes and Other Stories (Oxford World's Classics)


spacebreeze
A fantastic edition of three Balzac masterpieces, although their connection to each other is unknown and thematically tenuous. Sarrasine is a wondrous tale of a young sculptor who falls in love with a singer who is shrouded in mystery (covering music & sculpture). The Unknown Masterpiece is a fascinating tale of the creation of great painting through the interaction of three painters in discussion and act - one young, one middle-aged and established, the third old & experienced). The tale also (sort of) predicts cubism. The Girl With The Golden Eyes probably stands out among most of Balzac's work as being over-the-top erotic and grotesque (perhaps only The Wild Ass' Skin comes close to this one), a tale that fits more comfortable in the History Of The Thirteen collection of three stories. All three tales contain a love interest, that's a commonality, but practically every single Balzac tale involves obsessive love, though, doesn't it? Or every tale ever written for that matter...

Nonetheless, this is a wonderful collection, worthy of being read and then re-read.
Gavirus
I picked up this slim volume while reading Balzac's LE COLONEL CHABERT in French, and these notes are something of an extension to what I have already said in reviewing that. In addition to the title novella, the present book contains two shorter stories, "Sarrasine" and "The Unknown Masterpiece," all from the first half of Balzac's career. Although the author was known as a realist (and there are some wonderfully precise descriptions in the two books, spanning everything from high life to that of the common people), what the stories in this book have in common is a heightened color, a willingness to go over the top, even a sexual exoticism that is far from the sober tales that realism normally implies (see the first comment). The cover has a detail of "Women of Algiers" by Delacroix, to whom Balzac dedicated the title novella, which culminates in scenes set in an oriental divan. The parallel is deliberate and exact, although unlike the other two stories in the book, which are explicitly about artists, art as such is not mentioned in "The Girl with the Golden Eyes."

Rather, all three stories center around a romantic ideal of womanhood. The brilliant young sculptor who is the title character in "Sarrasine" pursues a singer in the theaters of Rome who turns out to be very different from what she appears. The hero of "The Girl" is a young Parisian dandy who becomes infatuated with the beautiful young woman of the title, only to find himself led into areas of dangerous eroticism where he completely loses his bearings. Set in the 17th century, "The Lost Masterpiece" is apparently more restrained, and two at least of its characters are not made up but real: the former court painter François Porbus and the young Nicholas Poussin. They both meet an older Flemish painter whom Balzac calls Frenhofer. This character establishes his credentials in an extended passage which must be one of the best discussions of art I have ever encountered in fiction, culminating in a demontration in which the older man transforms one of Porbus' paintings with a few swift touches of his brush. But his own pursuit of the ideal woman leads him to create a painting that verges on madness, especially as compared to the very real humanity of Poussin's young model and lover, Gilette.

The translations by Peter Collier were certainly serviceable, although I found their frequent use of modern phrases a jolt after reading the previous Balzac volume in French. But this should not put readers off exploring these extraordinary products of an extraordinary mind. And Collier's introduction and notes are scholarly, detailed, and immensely informative.