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Download Desire and Delusion: Three Novellas ePub

by Arthur Schnitzler

Download Desire and Delusion: Three Novellas ePub
  • ISBN 1566636035
  • ISBN13 978-1566636032
  • Language English
  • Author Arthur Schnitzler
  • Publisher Ivan R. Dee (June 30, 2004)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats txt azw lit doc
  • Category Fiction
  • Subcategory World Literature
  • Size ePub 1200 kb
  • Size Fb2 1931 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 753

Dying, Flight into Darkness, and Fraulein Else reveal the depths of Schnitzler's psychological and moral understanding of life as well as the masterful storytelling techniques that immerse the reader into the very center of his characters' thoughts and emotions. The tales of Arthur Schnitzler―especially as rendered in Margret Schaefer's clear, uncluttered translations―are many suggestive, allusive, and dreamlike things. But they are most certainly not the work of a period writer. ―Chris Lehmann, Washington Post Book World

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These three dark novellas show Schnitzler's mastery as a guide to the neurotic, death-obsessed world of. .

These three dark novellas show Schnitzler's mastery as a guide to the neurotic, death-obsessed world of fin-de-siècle Vienna. Schnitzler and Schaefer–a perfect marriage, made in Vienna.

In Desire and Delusion, Ms. Schaefer has translated three of Schnitzler's greatest novellas Dying, Flight into Darkness, and Fraulein Else. They reveal the depths of his psychological and moral understanding of life as well as the masterful storytelling techniques that immerse the reader into the very center of his characters' thoughts and emotions. Acknowledged masterpieces all, these novellas span Schnitzler's entire career from 1895 to 1931. They testify to his stature as depth psychologist, a doctor-writer fascinated by illness and very much at home in what Susan Sontag has.

Life, Arthur Schnitzler famously said, is what happens between love and death. Dying, Flight into Darkness, and Fraulein Else reveal the depths of Schnitzler's psychological and moral understanding of life as well as the masterful storytelling techniques that immerse the reader into the very center of his characters' thoughts and emotions.

But they are most certainly not the work of a period writer. Chris Lehmann, Washington Post Book World.

Schnitzler was orginally an Austrian doctor with a love of literature and writing, and at some point during his life, writing became his main profession.

Schnitzler was orginally an Austrian doctor with a love of literature and writing, and at some point during his life, writing became his main profession more I was pleasantly surprised by this book. At first, it seemed as though the stories were going to be of the straightforward "rich people and their problems" genre, but with a little patience, transformed into paranoid, anxious tales of the afflicted and obsessed.

First English publication of a recently rediscovered novella by one of the greatest European writers. One seemingly ordinary evening, Eduard Saxberger arrives home to find the fulfilment of a long-forgotten wish in his sitting room: a visitor has come to tell him that the youth of Vienna have discovered his poetic genius. Arthur Schnitzler (b. 1862 in Vienna) was one of the most influential European writers of the twentieth century, perhaps best known here for his novellas Dream Story and Fräulein Else.

Desire and Delusion : Three Novellas. By (author) Arthur Schnitzler, By (author) Margret Schaefer.

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Talk about Desire and Delusion: Three Novellas


Thetalas
Until recently Arthur Schnitzler (1862-1931) was known outside German-speaking countries primarily for his cycle of one-act plays, 'Reigen,' often called--even in English translation--'La Ronde' because of the deservedly famous movie version of that name by Max Ophuls. More recently though, his name has occasionally been heard because another of his works, 'Traumnovelle,' ('Dream Novella') served as a basis for Stanley Kubrick's last film, 'Eyes Wide Shut.' In this book we have three novellas in sparkling translations by Schnitzler scholar, Margret Schaefer, who had earlier translated several of the shorter stories (including 'Traumnovelle') in a volume called "Night Games: And Other Stories and Novellas." Her translations are vernacular and swift.

Schnitzler came of age in the Vienna of the period christened memorably by Frederic Morton 'A Nervous Splendor.' This was the fin-de-siè'cle Vienna in the waning days of its glory and power, a city consumed by social ritual, death, art, gossip. It was the city of Mahler, Freud, Klimt, and the tragic murder-suicide of Crown Price Rudolf and his mistress, Mary Vetsera, at Mayerling. The three novellas here--'Flight into Darkness,' 'Dying,' and 'Fräu'lein Else'--are very much concerned with those subjects that consumed the city. Indeed, they are very much darker than the rather more light-heartedly sophisticated, even frivolous (if sometimes ominous) subjects of 'Reigen' or 'Anatol' or 'Flirtation.'

A brief comment about each of the three novellas (without giving too much away):

'Flight into Darkness' describes the gradual and never straight-line psychological disintegration of its protagonist, Robert. It is said that Schnitzler himself served as model for his hero although he certainly was never clinically insane. Still, he had an obsessive nature and a tendency towards jealousy and paranoia. Stylistically, the novella, which took Schnitzler over two decades to put the finishing touches to, has an omniscient narrator privy to Robert's sometimes reeling ruminations.

'Dying' is about a man who may or may not be dying; we're never quite sure and that's part of the fascination. There are elements that remind one of Crown Prince Rudolf and his mistress, but it is not quite THAT story. Ms Schaefer comments that its applicability to our present day concern over AIDS is entirely apt, although Felix's illness is never specified.

'Fräulein Else' is remarkable in that it is a full-fledged example of stream-of-consciousness, the inner life of a 19-year-old girl, in writing that is entirely convincing and manages to be charming, amusing, shocking all at the same time. Ms Schaefer, in her excellent foreword, makes the claim that Schnitzler's stream-of-consciousness technique antedates that of Joyce or Woolf since it was first used in his earlier story, 'Lieutenant Gustl,' published in 1900.

This collection makes a strong case for Schnitzler as a writer who understands the human psyche as well as most later writers, and better than any of his contemporaries except Freud who, of course, was not a writer of fiction (most people would say). His ability to conjure up the physical environs and social milieu of Vienna is near unmatched. These are engrossing and disturbing stories leavened with wit--after all it was Schnitzler who said 'The way of wisdom is to take everything seriously, but nothing too seriously'--and informed by perspicacity.

Scott Morrison
Kabei
Easy to read, but the stories are predictable. Heavy on psychology! Frank Kafka is much better to read and understand.