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Download A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast ePub

by Curtis J. Badger

Download A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast ePub
  • ISBN 0813926181
  • ISBN13 978-0813926186
  • Language English
  • Author Curtis J. Badger
  • Publisher University of Virginia Press (October 17, 2007)
  • Pages 160
  • Formats mbr doc docx lrf
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1838 kb
  • Size Fb2 1923 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 911

Although swamps today are recognized as one of the richest and most prolific natural systems on Earth, they have long held a mysterious and tenuous place in America’s history and culture. Ernest Hemingway equated them with madness and death in "Big Two-hearted River." We have images of Humphrey Bogart covered with leeches while slogging through a swamp in the film The African Queen. In our culture, swamps have been associated with mystery and evil, and we spent generations draining, filling, and otherwise destroying them. Indeed, in the four centuries since the European colonists arrived, we have lost more than half of the forested wetlands that were native to America.

Swamps have until now received little attention, despite recent efforts to protect them. With A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast, Curtis Badger takes us on a personalized trip to the swamp, providing an insightful look at the nature of these special places, and arguing persuasively that these natural systems should be protected, not destroyed.

Using such locations as the Pocomoke River and the Great Dismal Swamp as exemplars of swamps in general, Badger examines the natural history of wetlands, and also relates the role they have played in the history and culture of the mid-Atlantic coast. A great iron furnace and its surrounding village once stood in a cypress swamp along Nassawango Creek in Maryland. The Great Dismal was a safe haven for runaway slaves, and it has been the source of many ghostly tales and legends.

Although swamps have for centuries been cast in a negative light, they are wonderfully productive places, a refuge for migrating songbirds, insects, fish, animals, and rare plants. Swamps and wetlands provide us with clean water, they protect uplands from flooding, and their waters serve as a spawning ground for valuable fish and shellfish. And, Badger writes, they provide us with an island of forested wilderness, a place where one can launch a canoe and temporarily escape the irritations of the modern world.

Notwithstanding the government’s goal of "no net loss" of wetlands, swamps are still being drained, filled, and paved over each year. With this book, Badger invites us to appreciate these special places and the natural communities they support.


Waters of the Mid-Atlantic: Discovering and Restoring a Region's Wetlands.

Waters of the Mid-Atlantic: Discovering and Restoring a Region's Wetlands. According to Curtis Badger, A swamp is a landscape that can’t decide what it wants to be (p. 29). Perhaps that explains the appeal of bogs, swamps, and wetlands for Badger, whose Quiet Waters is guidebook, historical treatise, and environmental science text rolled into one. Those familiar with his previous works, such as The Wild Coast: Exploring the Natural Attractions of the Mid-Atlantic (2005), will recognize this blend of styles, but should be prepared for a heavier dose of science this time around.

Swamps and wetlands provide us with clean water, they protect uplands .

Swamps and wetlands provide us with clean water, they protect uplands from flooding, and their waters serve as a spawning ground for valuable fish and shellfish. And, Badger writes, they provide us with an island of forested wilderness, a place where one can launch a canoe and temporarily escape the irritations of the modern world. With this book, Badger invites us to appreciate these special places and the natural communities they support. Jun 21, 2019 Hobbs rated it it was amazing.

Swamps and wetlands provide us with clean water, they protect uplands from flooding, and their waters serve as. . Notwithstanding the government's goal of "no net loss" of wetlands, swamps are still being drained, filled, and paved over each year.

History of Quiet Waters : Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast.

A Natural History of Quiet Waters : Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast. Although swamps today are recognized as one of the richest and most prolific natural systems on Earth, they have long held a mysterious and tenuous place in America's history and culture. Ernest Hemingway equated them with madness and death in "Big Two-hearted River. We have images of Humphrey Bogart covered with leeches while slogging through a swamp in the film The African Queen.

swamps and wetlands of the mid-atlantic coast. Published 2007 by University of Virginia Press in Charlottesville. Natural history, Wetland ecology, Wetlands, Swamps. Middle Atlantic States.

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A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast by Curtis J. Badger .

Ships from and sold by BOOK- LAND. The Virginia coast offers something for all-education programs at museums, easy wildlife watching at numerous refuges, and a wilderness experience on Virginia's Eastern Shore. From classrooms to tidal flats, opportunities to learn about nature abound.

Wetland conservation is aimed at protecting and preserving areas where water exists at or near the Earth's surface, such as swamps, marshes and bogs. Wetlands cover at least six per cent of the Earth and have become a focal issue for conservation due to the ecosystem services they provide. More than three billion people, around half the world’s population, obtain their basic water needs from inland freshwater wetlands.

Swamps have until now received little attention, despite recent efforts to protect them

Swamps have until now received little attention, despite recent efforts to protect them. With A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast, Curtis Badger takes us on a personalized trip to the swamp, providing an insightful look at the nature of these special places, and arguing persuasively that these natural systems should be protected, not destroyed

This book provides a short pictorial and narrative description of these two barrier islands, their history and relationship.

This book provides a short pictorial and narrative description of these two barrier islands, their history and relationship. One is a small town community catering to thousands of tourists who come almost year-round to enjoy the beach and view the wildlife on the other. This is a wonderfully well-written, easy to understand description of the swamps and wetlands of the East Coast and their importance to our environment, history and culture. It is written from the perspective of someone who has experienced them first hand.

Talk about A Natural History of Quiet Waters: Swamps and Wetlands of the Mid-Atlantic Coast


Innadril
Excellent book for anyone interested in nature. Anything written by Curtis Badger is very informative and well written. Well worth the price.
WUNDERKIND
When I became interested in Virginia's Eastern Shore, I soon discovered Curtis Badger's books. He made it sound so appealing, that I bought a house on Folly Creek, which he describes in several of his books. I also started taking graduate courses in natural history. I love the Shore and my home, but if he'd written this book a few years earlier, I'd probably have bought near him on Pungoteague Creek.

This short book is set on the Delmarva Peninsula (principally in Maryland) and in the Dismal Swamp, southwest of Norfolk. It's intended to be about wetlands, but the way Curtis Badger works is to start off on a trail and then wander where his curiosity leads him. Accompanying him is always interesting: He's a skilled writer with a careful eye and a discerning instinct.

The book opens with a natural history of wetlands but it follows with chapters on the economic history of a small village, Furnace Town, outside Snow Hill, Maryland; bird migration; the Dismal Swamp -- its history and legends; dragonflies and damselflies; and a description of the property he bought in Pungoteague. Every chapter is engaging, but the book reads like a collection of essays related by geography rather than a treatise that develops deeper understanding as it unfolds. After you've read the first chapter, you can read the others in any order you wish. Regardless of which order you read them, you'll want to visit the places he describes and meet the people he met.

The book was well designed by the University of Virginia Press, but with a glaring omission: a map of the area Badger describes. It will be of most interest to Delmarva residents. But if you're not a resident, and you read it, you might find yourself calling real estate agents like I did.