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Download Split: A Counterculture Childhood ePub

by Lisa Michaels

Download Split: A Counterculture Childhood ePub
  • ISBN 0395837391
  • ISBN13 978-0395837399
  • Language English
  • Author Lisa Michaels
  • Publisher Chapters Pub Ltd; First Edition edition (July 1, 1998)
  • Pages 307
  • Formats azw doc docx lit
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1920 kb
  • Size Fb2 1816 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 979

The author recounts her youth in the sixties and seventies as a child of leftist activists, from wandering the country's highways to growing vegetables in a California commune

Start reading Split: A Counterculture Childhood on your Kindle in under a minute. That is pretty much the counter-culture content. I heard Lisa Michaels speak locally and finally got around to reading her book, Split. I read it in two sittings.

Start reading Split: A Counterculture Childhood on your Kindle in under a minute. Aside from what she ate or didn't eat, or that her father was unionizing, it could easily be the story of a girl whose father blew up a marriage by being away working all the time.

It is described as being a memoir about a childhood in the counterculture, but Lisa Michaels' childhood in the counterculture is basically done by the time she's four or five years old. She lived in a commune with her mom for a summer when she was three. Her dad was in prison for his involvement with The Weathermen, but once he was out of prison, he dedicated his life to the labor movement and working in a factory in Los Angeles. After the summer commune, Lis I feel totally duped by this memoir!

In Split, Lisa Michaels offers a strikingly textured portrait of her days of communes and road trips, of. .Observant, luminous, and wry, Split captures both the vulnerability and heady freedom of a counterculture childhood.

In Split, Lisa Michaels offers a strikingly textured portrait of her days of communes and road trips, of antiwar protests and rallies -- and of what came after, for her parents and herself -- as the radicalism of the 1960s and '70s gave way to conservative times. As a young child, Michaels visited her father in prison, where he was serving a two-year sentence for his part in an antiwar protest.

Split: A Counterculture Childhood offer a child’s-eye view of the counterculture and protest movements

Split: A Counterculture Childhood offer a child’s-eye view of the counterculture and protest movements.

In Split, Lisa Michaels offers a strikingly textured portrait of her days of communes and road trips, of.

Lisa Michaels was born in Newark, . to young civil rights activists who met at Cornell. Her father was a member of Students for a Democratic Society and Weatherman, and spent time in prison for his part in a protest against the war in Vietnam. Her mother and stepfather traveled around the country in a mail truck before settling in a Northern California town to teach school and grow vegetables. Lisa did her undergraduate degree in history at . in poetry at Mills College

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Split: A Counterculture Childhood.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In Split, Lisa Michaels offers a strikingly textured portrait of her days of communes and road trips, of antiwar protests and rallies -- and of what came after, for her parents and herself -- as the radicalism of the 1960s and '70s gave way to conservative times.

Split: A Counterculture Childhood. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1998. 033416) Michaels, Lisa.

Michaels's upbringing was marked by communes, rallies, and road trips; as a young girl she traveled across the . By a writer of uncommon perception, SPLIT offers "a rare glimpse of a life that embodies a time" (Vogue).

Michaels's upbringing was marked by communes, rallies, and road trips; as a young girl she traveled across the country with her mother and stepfather in a customized mail truck, complete with a wood stove, while her father spent two years in jail for his part in an antiwar protest.

Chelsea Cain spent her early childhood eating organic tomatoes off the vine on a commune in Iowa

Her work has appeared in Glamour, Salon and the New York Times Magazine. Chelsea Cain spent her early childhood eating organic tomatoes off the vine on a commune in Iowa. The magic and hope of her girlhood continue to shape her. But she still hates carob.

Talk about Split: A Counterculture Childhood


greatest
I am going to break my ,"no book reviews" rule, and review this one. I usually don't review books because whether or not you like a book usually depends on personality, and what you were expecting. But this book was awful. I made myself read it, but found that it read like one giant run-on sentence. She kept going in circles ( o.k. I get it you were lonely and misunderstood, welcome to adolescence).
The hippie stuff was also very boring. It consisted of a very very short time in a commune ( six months I think), and some time living out of a mail truck. The rest was a relatively normal broken-home experience.
To be fair this woman can definately weave words, and knowing that she is a poet, I think she should have stuck with that. Her poetry is probably amazing. Unfortunately,this book was undisciplined,self-absorbed, and like listening to someone ramble on and on saying whatever is in their head. I really hate that I bought this, I wish I would have checked it out from the library.
Kulwes
Wonderfully written...so human and real. I loved it.
wanderpool
This is the story...of a girl named Lisa....who was angry that her parents had just split.... Until one day when her mother met this fellow who was driving an old mail truck of his own...so the three of them became a family ... While her Dad got arrested for assault and battery and violent activism generally and went off to prison...and Lisa never forgave him.

No, this memoir by 60's baby Lisa Michaels is certainly not boring. "split" refers to the fact that her left wing radical parents broke up and that she had to grow up without her Dad, accept a hippie mother and her Southern dropout new boyfriend Jim as they drive around and live in an old US mail truck. Her Dad is an old fashioned leftwint radical from New York of Russian Jewisj immigrant grandparents but a single Mom, hence hard times for him as a kid and sympathy for the working underclasses. Or else extreme anger hardening into revenge Communistic blow things up thinking. Her father chose the Weathermen, later the Weather Underground to avoid the sexism of the original group name, and at the Harvard International Center joined a riot and got arrested for two years in Billerica outside Boston. My own sister lives in Billerica so I found this an interesting tidbit. She never mentioned the prison before.

And so Lisa Philips began her life's journey with her prim and proper gentile mother, who was spurning the materialism of her own youth. They lived in this mail truck and wound up in Ukiah about 3 hours north of San francisco. Since I grew up in San francisco at the same time as Lisa, I found the book very interesting but examined it's details more carefully than some might.

First of all, the mother had $18,000 in inheritance in 1969 and bought a multi unit place in rural redwoods and grapes and ranches Ukiah. That would be like starting out after college with about a million dollars today. They were far from poor although the mother likes to be counterculture. She and her new mate Jim rarely had to work so they gardened and read. Apparently they Werent into Drugs or drinking but also not into childcare or working.

Eventually the mother got a teaching certificate and began a real job as a teacher. Jim fiddled around and Lisa ran free with the neighbors kids. They had no tv and it was a big source of shame for Lisa that she didn't know the Brady Bunch and that she wore hippy clotures and didn't ear standaed American trash food. She was a misfit amongst the ranchers families and politically ridiculously left in a real American town. Marx and Mao were everyday fare for her. Her classmates quickly pegged her as a weirdo. I can imagine what their parents said!

Meanwhile there is the ache oh the void the huge hole that is her father's neglect and absence. She is angry and remains so against this abandonment until book's end, her marriage at age 32 to a Mexican Jew. The father is apologetic but gets himself a new wife, Leslie, who tries to mother Lisa but only feels maternal when she has Lisa's half-sister.

Money is tight and Lisa does write well of her struggle to get jobs and money and a car. She shoplifts and gets caught while with her father in Berkeley. She is an angry young lady.

What is strangely omitted is the town where she grows up. She never says Ukiah and one can figure it out later when she makes a new friend in high school who lives with her dad in a new Buddhist center that was once a state mental institution. I looked this up and realized finally that it was the Home of the 10,000 Buddhas, opened in 1974 in Ukiah. Poor Lisa is forever getting shuttled between Ukiah with her Mom and Jim and then to Berkeley with her Dad and his new wife Leslie. There is a lot of fighting and her Dad is still an activist doing organizing at the new Fremont assembly line.

I Found it odd too that Leslie and her father would work the assembly line of an auto plant but the wages were very high Union level. They could finally afford to buy a house in San jose. Apparently also in the 1980's her father and or her mother has good incomes to own homes and have more kids and keep Lisa full time for four years at UCLA living in the dorms with a car of her own. Having lived through those times myself I know we are talking about a lot of money for the average family. Lisa as a a writer skips over this sudden jump in the family's prosperity which is too disingenuous.

Also very disappointing after her studies, she flounders around in India and Nepal and then wastes about ten years at silly administrative jobs until she marries the old boyfriend. What became of her ambition? Fling it all away and just stay home as a housewife? Yet that is how the book ends. She becomes a nobody after years of Sturm und Drang. We are supposed to be content that she just drops out and marriage is the end all and be all for her ?

For those who do like similar stories I recommend The Territory of Men by Fraser and The House with No Roof. Both are stories by daughters of disrupted families of flaky fathers and hippie job hopping mothers. The first is in Saisalito and the second in Bolinas and all in the same time period.
cyrexoff
I enjoyed this autobiography primarily because it reminded me of many of my own thoughts and feelings when I was growing up. This in itself is interesting because I am ten years older than the writer, male, and had parents who were 180 degrees in their thinking and life styles from those of Michaels'. I found Michaels' powers of observation and reportage to be keen and witty which made this an interesting read as well. Not a book I will be putting on the shelf and hoping to reread but one which I am glad I read although I have no idea why I bought it in the first place.
Centrizius
A biography of a young woman for about her first 20 something years. The book is easy to read, but not that interesting.

I am researching the 60 counterculture - specifically communes. There is surprisingly little counterculture, what there is seems to happen 'off camera' in her life. Her parents were radicals, dad was off organizing unions and speechifying, mom took care of her, and she ate natural foods and they lived very cheaply. Her parents split up.

She got flack for eating natural foods, dressing as a hippie child from the other kids, teachers. Lived briefly in a commune, what we learn about that was that she was mostly unsupervised and viewed the world as her bathroom. Later she and her mom lived in the back of a retired mail truck. That is pretty much the counter-culture content.

Aside from what she ate or didn't eat, or that her father was unionizing, it could easily be the story of a girl whose father blew up a marriage by being away working all the time. It is another story of a young person who is uncertain who they are, what they should do. And the second half of the book seems .... irrelevant.

It was entertaining enough that I finished it, not enough for me to recommend it to anyone. If you are looking for information on the counterculture, look elsewhere.