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Download The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980 (Center Books) ePub

by Charles E. Connerly

Download The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980 (Center Books) ePub
  • ISBN 0813923344
  • ISBN13 978-0813923345
  • Language English
  • Author Charles E. Connerly
  • Publisher University of Virginia Press (July 19, 2005)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats lrf txt mbr docx
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1439 kb
  • Size Fb2 1880 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 592

One of Planetizen’s Top Ten Books of 2006

"But for Birmingham," Fred Shuttleworth recalled President John F. Kennedy saying in June 1963 when he invited black leaders to meet with him, "we would not be here today." Birmingham is well known for its civil rights history, particularly for the violent white-on-black bombings that occurred there in the 1960s, resulting in the city’s nickname "Bombingham." What is less well known about Birmingham’s racial history, however, is the extent to which early city planning decisions influenced and prompted the city’s civil rights protests. The first book-length work to analyze this connection, "The Most Segregated City in America": City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980 uncovers the impact of Birmingham’s urban planning decisions on its black communities and reveals how these decisions led directly to the civil rights movement.

Spanning over sixty years, Charles E. Connerly’s study begins in the 1920s, when Birmingham used urban planning as an excuse to implement racial zoning laws, pointedly sidestepping the 1917 U.S. Supreme Court Buchanan v. Warley decision that had struck down racial zoning. The result of this obstruction was the South’s longest-standing racial zoning law, which lasted from 1926 to 1951, when it was redeclared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Despite the fact that African Americans constituted at least 38 percent of Birmingham’s residents, they faced drastic limitations to their freedom to choose where to live. When in the1940s they rebelled by attempting to purchase homes in off-limit areas, their efforts were labeled as a challenge to city planning, resulting in government and court interventions that became violent. More than fifty bombings ensued between 1947 and 1966, becoming nationally publicized only in 1963, when four black girls were killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church.

Connerly effectively uses Birmingham’s history as an example to argue the importance of recognizing the link that exists between city planning and civil rights. His demonstration of how Birmingham’s race-based planning legacy led to the confrontations that culminated in the city’s struggle for civil rights provides a fresh lens on the history and future of urban planning, and its relation to race.


Connerly wrote in his book, "Birmingham used city planning as a rationale for adopting a racial zoning law, even though .

Connerly wrote in his book, "Birmingham used city planning as a rationale for adopting a racial zoning law, even though the . Supreme Court in 1917 struck down racial zoning. Birmingham flouted the court and racial zoning stood unchallenged in Birmingham from 1926 until it was declared unconstitutional by the high court in 1951

The first book-length work to analyze this connection, ""The Most Segregated City in America": City .

The first book-length work to analyze this connection, ""The Most Segregated City in America": City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980" uncovers the impact of Birmingham's urban planning decisions on its black communities and reveals how these decisions led directly to the civil rights movement. Spanning over sixty years, Charles E. Connerly's study begins in the 1920s, when Birmingham used urban planning as an excuse to implement racial zoning laws, pointedly sidestepping the 1917 .

For the first time, in The Most Segregated City in America, an historical connection is delineated between civil rights and planning practices in Birmingham

For the first time, in The Most Segregated City in America, an historical connection is delineated between civil rights and planning practices in Birmingham.

Here, the city's people, black and white, created their own patterns and . Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right Google Scholar

Here, the city's people, black and white, created their own patterns and platforms of racial relations in the public and cultural spheres. Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940 by Grace Elizabeth Hale. Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit Suburban Warriors: The Origins of the New American Right Google Scholar. ConnerlyCharles . The Most Segregated City in America : City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2005.

Connerly, C. E. (2005). The most segregated city in America : City planning and civil rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press. Conover, T. (2006) In: Brunn S. (eds) Engineering Earth.

Big Mules and Bottom Rails in the Magic City Planning and Jim Crow Planning, Neighborhood Change, and Civil Rights "The Spirit of Racial Zoning" Urban Renewal and Highways Civil Rights and City Planning The African American Planning Tradition in Birmingham The Evolution of Black Neighborhood Empowerment. Geographic Name: Birmingham (Al. Race relations History 20th century. Download "The most segregated city in America" : city planning and civil rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980 Charles E. Connerly leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Conglomerate corporations.

City in America : City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980. Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2005.

The Most Segregated City in America : City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980. Main Author: Connerly, Charles E. Format: eBook. Series: Center Bks. Subjects: Segregation Alabama Birmingham History 20th century. City planning Alabama Birmingham History 20th century. African Americans Civil rights Alabama Birmingham History 20th century. Civil rights movements Alabama Birmingham History 20th century.

The Most Segregated City in America": City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980, University of Virginia Press (Charlottesville, VA), 2005. Contributor to books, including Planning the Twentieth-Century American City, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996; In the Shadows: Historical Notes on Planning and the African-American Community, Sage, 1997; and Encyclopedia of Housing, Sage, 1998.

The Most Segregated City in America" City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press.

Lhasa: Streets with Memories. New York: Columbia University Press. Tales of Two Cities: Women and Municipal Restructuring in London and Toronto. The Most Segregated City in America" City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920-1980. Dittmar, Hank and Gloria Ohland, eds. 2004. The New Transit Town: Best Practices in Transit-Oriented Development. Washington DC: Island Press. Edwards, Justin E. and Douglas Ivison, eds.

Talk about The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980 (Center Books)


Lavivan
Let me first say that I am giving the book five stars to correct the status of its true value. The one star review is a joke, but it appears to be the only one, and that cannot be allowed to stand. Were I basing this on merit alone, I would give it four, I think.

I lived in Birmingham for most of my life. Most of the things that are alluded to in this book - particularly the redistricting of the area that now comprises UAB are things that I witnessed, but did not understand at the time. Birmingham and the surrounding areas are generally not looking out for the region as a whole, but fighting to preserve tiny kingdoms in aspic, which confused me for a long period of time until I realized that the genesis of this attitude went back much, much earlier to the very founding of the city, and was incorporated into the ways the large black minority was "handled" over the years. This book explains a great deal of the detail about how that actually came to be, and the process as to how it was put into practice. I wish the writing was a little more fluid - I don't know if people unfamiliar with the city will be able to keep pace with the switching locales and street specifics, but *I* loved it.

I am sure there are many other cities where this approach would uncover similar plans and similar circumstances, and Birmingham has a long history of being singled out to prove a point about race, so I am sure there will be outcries based on this alone. Nevertheless, if the shoe fits..........

Incidentally, Birmingham is a much different place now than it was when I was growing up in the 60's and 70's, and I would not want to give off the impression that the city has not learned from it's past. I lived there as an adult for many years in a racially mixed downtown neighborhood, and there were few - if any - problems. FYI.
Ber
Need to balance the one star review here. Yes, there are a few books on the history of racism in the south, however very few look at how this was was actualized through the physical environment. Im just sad Connerly didn't produce more.
Ishnjurus
I would give this book a zero, but a zero is not one of the options. The book stirs up hatred for the South and specifically Birmingham, Alabama.

Connerly wrote in his book, "Birmingham used city planning as a rationale for adopting a racial zoning law, even though the U.S. Supreme Court in 1917 struck down racial zoning. Birmingham flouted the court and racial zoning stood unchallenged in Birmingham from 1926 until it was declared unconstitutional by the high court in 1951."

The author is guilty of stirring up hate for the South, and in my opinion speculates on Birmingham's city planning as a rationale for adopting a racial zoning law. Unless Connerly actually sat on those long ago planning boards in 1917, and actually observed their actions, he cannot speculate on their motives. Will the hate mongers and racists ever go home?

Now why not a story on the State of Indiana's Jim Crow Constitution. Years before Lincoln's War on the South, the State of Indiana's Constitution denied all blacks the right to enter into the State of Indiana. Before a black man or woman could enter into the State of Indiana, the black person had to pay a $1,000 bond before coming into the state. The Indiana Constitution was very effective in keeping blacks out of the State of Indiana.

This book reeks with derision and intolerance and hatred for the South. How many decades will we hear about this book? How many times will the South be used as an example of racism and hatred for black people, when the north is just as guilty?

Racial tensions in Birmingham and Alabama and the South will never get better and racism will never be laid to rest. There are too many in Birmingham and other racist hot-beds of hate, like Connerly's University of Iowa School of Urban and Regional Planning, who make a living out of bringing up racist and divisive issues.

Substitute good for evil, and build another monument to civil rights, rename another city street, and embellish the story beyond belief. Spread the latest racist garbage against the South around the world, so others can hate the south.

The racist federally imposed voting district lines are racist and unconstitutional in the first place. How about a story on that bit of truth?

Instead we have another bash the South book.