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Download Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Asian America) ePub

by Madeline Hsu

Download Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Asian America) ePub
  • ISBN 0804738149
  • ISBN13 978-0804738149
  • Language English
  • Author Madeline Hsu
  • Publisher Stanford University Press; 1 edition (November 1, 2000)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats txt mbr azw lit
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1213 kb
  • Size Fb2 1197 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 990

This book is a highly original study of transnationalism among immigrants from Taishan, a populous coastal county in south China from which, until 1965, the majority of Chinese in the United States originated. Drawing creatively on Chinese-language sources such as gazetteers, newspapers, and magazines, supplemented by fieldwork and interviews as well as recent scholarship in Chinese social history, the author presents a much richer depiction than we have had heretofore of the continuing ties between Taishanese remaining in China and their kinsmen seeking their fortune in “Gold Mountain.”Long after the gold in California ran out and prejudice confined them to dismal Chinatowns, generations of Chinese—mostly men from rural areas of southern China—continued to migrate to the United States in hopes of bettering the family’s lot by remitting much of the meager sums they earned as laundrymen, cooks, domestic workers, and Chinatown merchants.Economic hardships and U.S. Exclusion laws extended the immigrants’ separation from their families for decades, “sojourns” that in many cases ended only in death. Men lived as bachelors and their wives as widows, parents passed away, and children grew up without ever seeing their fathers’ faces. Families and village communities had to adapt to survive the stress of long-term, long-distance separation from their primary wage-earners.At the same time, men raised in the rural communities of a faltering imperial China had to negotiate encounters with an industrializing, Western-dominated, often hostile world. This history explores the resiliency and flexibility of rural Chinese, qualities that enabled them to preserve their families by living apart from them and to survive the intertwining of their rural world with global systems of race, labor, and capital. The author demonstrates that through migration to dank and narrow enclaves, they came to live, and even to flourish, in a transnational community that persisted despite decades of separation and an ocean’s width of distance.

Dreaming of Gold, Dreamin. has been added to your Cart

Dreaming of Gold, Dreamin. has been added to your Cart. Recipient of the 2002 Association of Asian American Studies’ book award, Hsu is able to call on her talents as both a Chinese and Asian American historian to weave a transnational analysis of the immigration history of Taishanese in both locations. Journal of Asian Studies. An outstanding book, and exemplar of how to do a transnational study that captures the often globe-spanning histories of migrants out of Asia.

This book is a highly original study of transnationalism among immigrants from Taishan, a populous coastal county in south China from which, until 1965, the majority of Chinese in the United States originated.

States and South China, 1882-1943 .

Journal of Asian American Studies . (2001) 293-295 Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943. Besides being a wonderful archival historian, Hsu also writes well, and she weaves a tapestry of the larger contexts of historical events in both China and the United States by threading in the poignant examples of individual lives.

This book analyses class in the US from onwards.

com: Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Asian America) (9780804746878): Madeline Y. Hsu: Books. Coming Apart: The State Of White America, by Charles Murray From the bestselling author of Losing Ground and The Bell Curve, this startling long-lens view shows how America is coming apart at the seams that historically have joined our classes. This book analyses class in the US from onwards. It consists of three parts: one dealing with the new elite classe, one with the new lower class, a. Reads a bit like a textbook, but has some very interesting points.

Recommend this journal.

By Madeline Y. Hsu. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2000. Recommend this journal. The Journal of Asian Studies.

Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnational-ism and Migration between the United States and South China, 1882–1943. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Critical Inquiry 19: 726–751. CrossRefGoogle Scholar. McKee, Delber L. 1986.

transnationalism and migration between the United States and South China, 1882-1943. by Madeline Yuan-yin Hsu. Published 2000 by Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif Series. Published 2000 by Stanford University Press in Stanford, Calif. Ethnic identity, Chinese, Chinese Americans, Migrations, Social conditions, Internet Archive Wishlist, Emigration and immigration, Social aspects of Nationalism, Nationalism, History.

Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South . Journal of Asian Studies 59:2 (May 2000): 307-331

Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943. Stanford University Press, 2000. Association for Asian American Studies History Book Award, 2002. Journal of Asian Studies 59:2 (May 2000): 307-331. University of Illinois Press, 2016.

Talk about Dreaming of Gold, Dreaming of Home: Transnationalism and Migration Between the United States and South China, 1882-1943 (Asian America)


Vital Beast
This book is written by one of the foremost scholars on Chinese immigration. It gives a broad overview of the circumstances of immigration from China, focused primarily on the years during the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882-1943) - when my grandfather emigrated. The book talks about what was going on in China at that time, particularly southern China where most immigrants came from, what their old/new lives were like, family structure, economic challenges and rewards, and how the Chinese navigated the immigration minefield during this period.

Because we grew up knowing so little about my grandfather, this book was a revelation - it explains why so many Chinese came, how they survived and protected themselves, how and why they prospered (or didn't), and what became of their families back in China. A must-read for anyone with Chinese ancestors!

The only reason I gave it 4 stars is that the book is a little academic and contains a bit too many data tables. More photographs (of which there are several) and anecdotes would have made this more entertaining.
Hucama
I am Chinese American, specifically Hoisanese American. The Hoisan people is what this book specifically focuses on, their history in the US as well as China during the same time period. It is the chronicle of one culture that lives in two places, and how each group affects the other, and how they each lead such different lives that would not be possible without living apart.
This is a must read for people who wish to learn the particulars of the early Chinese immigrants to the US and the lasting effect to this day. This is not the same group of Chinese who are still migrating, it is a very different group from a much smaller region, and many people nowadays don't realize that Chinese American history started with this particular group. Our dialect has become unpopular, and we are thought of as peasants and farmers by the more official and polished sounding speakers of Mandarin and Cantonese. This book recognizes and documents the huge and dedicated efforts by the Hoisanese people to pave the way for Chinese Americans of today, and one would be ignorant of one's own Chinese American history without this knowledge. Many American-born Chinese do not even realize that their roots tie back to this group. It is a humbling read.