derrierloisirs.fr
» » Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars (Florida History and Culture)

Download Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars (Florida History and Culture) ePub

by James B. Crooks

Download Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars (Florida History and Culture) ePub
  • ISBN 081302708X
  • ISBN13 978-0813027081
  • Language English
  • Author James B. Crooks
  • Publisher University Press of Florida; 1st edition (March 29, 2004)
  • Pages 296
  • Formats txt lrf rtf docx
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1471 kb
  • Size Fb2 1307 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 645

"A fascinating account of how the city of Jacksonville met the major challenges of the last half of the 20th century, from those posed by race relations to downtown development to the environment. Crooks has provided a well-written, clear, and thoughtful analysis of the need for and movement to establish a consolidated government, and the early years of that government. His understanding of Jacksonville and of the times is impressive."--Joan S. Carver, Jacksonville University

In the 1950s and '60s Jacksonville faced daunting problems. Critics described city government as boss-ridden, expensive, and corrupt. African Americans challenged racial segregation, and public high schools were disaccredited. The St. Johns River and its tributaries were heavily polluted. Downtown development had succumbed to suburban sprawl.

Consolidation, endorsed by an almost two-to-one majority in 1967, became the catalyst for change. The city's decision to consolidate with surrounding Duval County began the transformation of this conservative, Deep South, backwater city into a prosperous, mainstream metropolis. James B. Crooks introduces readers to preconsolidation Jacksonville and then focuses on three major issues that confronted the expanded city: racial relations, environmental pollution, and the revitalization of downtown. He shows the successes and setbacks of four mayors--Hans G. Tanzler, Jake Godbold, Tommy Hazouri, and Ed Austin—in responding to these issues. He also compares Jacksonville's experience with that of another Florida metropolis, Tampa, which in 1967 decided against consolidation with surrounding Hillsborough County.

Consolidation has not been a panacea for all the city's ills, Crooks concludes. Yet the city emerges in the 21st century with increased support for art and education, new economic initiatives, substantial achievements in downtown renewal, and laudable efforts to improve race relations and address environmental problems. Readers familiar with Jacksonville over the last 40 years will recognize events like the St. Johns River cleanup, the building of the Jacksonville Landing, the ending of odor pollution, and the arrival of the Jaguars NFL franchise.

During the administration of Mayor Hazouri from 1987 to 1991, Crooks was Jacksonville historian-in-residence at City Hall. Combining observations from this period with extensive interviews and documents (including a cache of files from the mezzanine of the old City Hall parking garage that contained 44 cabinets of letters, memos, and reports), he has written an urban history that will fascinate scholars of politics and governmental reform as well as residents of the First Coast city.  

James B. Crooks is emeritus professor of history at the University of North Florida


James Crook’s detailed study of Jacksonville before and after the consolidation provides a wealth of. .I am moving to Jacksonville soon, and this book was a handy history of Jacksonville in the last half of the 20th century

James Crook’s detailed study of Jacksonville before and after the consolidation provides a wealth of information and insight about the community. Florida Historical Quarterly. I am moving to Jacksonville soon, and this book was a handy history of Jacksonville in the last half of the 20th century. The book shows how Jacksonville's heritage is that of the rural, blue collar south: conservative Democratic until the 1990s, conservative Republican thereafter.

James B. Crooks introduces readers to preconsolidation Jacksonville and then . During the administration of Mayor Hazouri from 1987 to 1991, Crooks was Jacksonville ce at City Hall. Crooks introduces readers to preconsolidation Jacksonville and then focuses on three major issues that confronted the expanded city: racial relations, environmental pollution, and the revitalization of downtown. He shows the successes and setbacks of four mayors-Hans G. Tanzler, Jake Godbold, Tommy Hazouri, and Ed Austin-in responding to these issues. Consolidation has not been a panacea for all the city's ills, Crooks concludes.

Jacksonville : The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars. In the 1950s and '60s Jacksonville faced daunting problems. Critics described city government as boss-ridden, expensive, and corrupt. The St. Johns River and its tributaries were heavily polluted. Downtown development had succumbed to suburban sprawl. Consolidation, endorsed by an almost two-to-one majority in 1967, became the catalyst for change.

Crooks himself is a personification of Jacksonville. Yet, he never accurately and definitively tells us why Jacksonville was the only city in which consolidation turned a city at the end of its rope into a major metropolis.

Kari Frederickson, James B. Crooks. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

That year Congress had passed the Civil Rights Act that ended legal racial segregation of public facilities, and the state was . James B. Crooks (2004). Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars. University Press of Florida. ISBN 978-0-8130-2708-1.

That year Congress had passed the Civil Rights Act that ended legal racial segregation of public facilities, and the state was working to adapt to other changes. On January 19, 1965 Yates called a lunch meeting of the chamber at the Robert Meyer Hotel to decide on a course of action for the region.

Jacksonville: The Consolidation Story, from Civil Rights to the Jaguars (University Press of Florida), looks at three decades of Jacksonville history - from events of the early 1960s, which led to consolidation, through the end of Mayor Ed Austin's administration. Crooks' book is a reminder of just how backward a city Jacksonville was in many ways in the 1950s and early 1960s, a reminder of why someone from New Jersey would not necessarily have agreed with the city's slogan of the day, "the Bold New City of the South

General northeast florida history. Crooks, James B. Jacksonville : the consolidation story, from civil rights to the Jaguars.

General northeast florida history. Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2004. Jacksonville: images through the 20th century from the archives of The Florida Times-Union. The Jacksonville Journal began publication in 1887 as the Metropolis, later the Florida Metropolis. In 1922, it was purchased by Joseph H. Perry and renamed the Jacksonville Journal. The Florida Publishing Co. (parent company of The Florida Times-Union) purchased the Journal in 1959, and it remained the chief Jacksonville afternoon paper until it ceased publication on October 28, 1988.

James Crooks introduces readers to preconsolidation Jacksonville and then focuses on three major issues that confronted the expanded city: racial relations, environmental pollution, and the revitalization of downtown

James Crooks introduces readers to preconsolidation Jacksonville and then focuses on three major issues that confronted the expanded city: racial relations, environmental pollution, and the revitalization of downtown. This urban history will fascinate scholars of politics and governmental reform as well as residents of the First Coast city.

It is easy to see the comparisons of the cities and the struggles they each faced