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Download Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour ePub

by Arthur Morey,Lynne Olson

Download Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour ePub
  • ISBN 1400165954
  • ISBN13 978-1400165957
  • Language English
  • Author Arthur Morey,Lynne Olson
  • Publisher Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (March 3, 2010)
  • Formats rtf azw lit txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1115 kb
  • Size Fb2 1331 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 894

In Citizens of London, Lynne Olson has written a work of World War II history even more relevant and revealing than her acclaimed Troublesome Young Men. Here is the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant. Drawing from a variety of primary sources, Olson skillfully depicts the dramatic personal journeys of these men who, determined to save Britain from Hitler, helped convince a cautious Franklin Roosevelt and a reluctant American public to support the British at a critical time.The three-Murrow, the handsome, chain-smoking head of CBS News in Europe; Harriman, the hard-driving millionaire who ran FDR's Lend-Lease program in London; and Winant, the shy, idealistic U.S. ambassador to Britain-formed close ties with Winston Churchill and were drawn into Churchill's official and personal circles. So intense were their relationships with the Churchills that they all became romantically involved with members of the prime minister's family: Harriman and Murrow with Churchill's daughter-in-law, Pamela, and Winant with his favorite daughter, Sarah. Others were honorary "citizens of London" as well, including the gregarious, fiercely ambitious Dwight D. Eisenhower, an obscure general who, as the first commander of American forces in Britain, was determined to do everything in his power to make the alliance a success, and Tommy Hitchcock, a world-famous polo player and World War I fighter pilot who helped save the Allies' bombing campaign against Germany.Citizens of London, however, is more than just the story of these Americans and the world leaders they aided and influenced. It's an engrossing account of the transformative power of personal diplomacy and, above all, a rich, panoramic tale of two cities: Washington, D.C., a lazy Southern town slowly growing into a hub of international power, and London, a class-conscious capital transformed by the Blitz into a model of stoic grace under violent pressure and deprivation. Deeply human, brilliantly researched, and beautifully written, Citizens of London is a new triumph from an author swiftly becoming one of the finest in her field.

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Citizens of London is a great read about the small band of Americans and their courageous role in helping Britain through the darkest days of early World War II. I thought I knew a lot about this dangerous period, but Lynne Olson has taught me so much more

Citizens of London is a great read about the small band of Americans and their courageous role in helping Britain through the darkest days of early World War II. I thought I knew a lot about this dangerous period, but Lynne Olson has taught me so much more. Tom Brokaw, author of The Greatest Generation. A deeply inspiring chronicle of the special relationship between America and Britain when it mattered most. Chris Matthews, anchor, MSNBC’s Hardball Ingenious history.

In this book three well-to-do Americans wind up in Winston Churchill’s coterie as advisors and watchdogs over the activities between the US and Britain as the war escalates

Citizens of London book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Citizens of London book. Start by marking Citizens of London: The Americans who Stood with Britain in its Darkest, Finest Hour as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Three fascinating Americans living in London helped cement the World War II alliance between Roosevelt and Churchill. Lynne Olson brings us the wonderful saga of Harriman, Murrow, and Winant

Three fascinating Americans living in London helped cement the World War II alliance between Roosevelt and Churchill. Lynne Olson brings us the wonderful saga of Harriman, Murrow, and Winant. Walter Isaacson, author of Einstein. CITIZENS OF LONDON: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour. Nutzerbericht - Kirkus. How the initially fragile Anglo-American alliance was forged in the perilous days of World War I. n early 1941, Britain was perilously close to being forced to surrender to Germany. Vollständige Rezension lesen.

In Citizens of London, Lynne Olson has written a work of World War II history even more relevant and revealing than .

In Citizens of London, Lynne Olson has written a work of World War II history even more relevant and revealing than her acclaimed Troublesome Young Men. Here is the behind-the-scenes story of how the United States forged its wartime alliance with Britain, told from the perspective of three key American players in London: Edward R. Murrow, Averell Harriman, and John Gilbert Winant.

Talk about Citizens of London: The Americans Who Stood with Britain in Its Darkest, Finest Hour


Faell
As a devotee of all well written historical biographies of FDR and Churchill, "Citizens of London," by Lynne Olson, lets us share the stories of, "the Americans who stood with Britain in its darkest, finest hour." Although familiar with Averill Harriman from my many sorties into the murky, war-torn, political world of FDR and Churchill, Edward R. Murrow and Gil Winant were peripheral characters in my library.

Murrow, of course, was the CBS radio reporter wunderkind whose "This is London... " signature brought World War II into the homes of Americans on a regular basis, opening their minds and hearts to the plight of Great Britain and the danger of German aggression. His reports from the rooftops of London helped to pave the way for a lifting of isolationism as FDR cautiously prodded America to enter the fray.

John Gilbert Winant, Olson tells us, was a natural leader and the American ambassador who soothed British spirits and soul following former Ambassador Joe Kennedy's brash, appeasement-centered, diplomatic relations. And Averill Harriman, a rich businessman anxious to play power games at a global level, lived large romantically as he cut a wide social swath across London.

When you have a few hours to yourself, pick up this paperback and settle in. I promise you a fascinating read and a thoughtful study of the men who helped lay the foundation for the FDR/Churchill special relationship. They deserve more attention than other authors have given them.
Malojurus
Lynne Olson, author of “Citizens of London,” is a bestselling writer of historical nonfiction, aimed mainly at Britain’s critical role in World War II. Her studies are immaculate in both research and writing skills. Her ability to take a reader through complexity and intense human impact without the aridity usually associated with historical commentary is amazing.

In this book three well-to-do Americans wind up in Winston Churchill’s coterie as advisors and watchdogs over the activities between the US and Britain as the war escalates. They eventually end up very sympathetic to the plight of the Britishers and less than approving of the opposition from FDR and reluctant US citizens to getting America involved. The hardy and determined British citizens suffered greatly as the United States refused to come to their assistance in battling the German forces that threatened to obliterate their nation and the misery was exacerbated by this obstinacy.

John Winant was the idealistic US ambassador to Britain, Averell Harriman ran FDR’s Lend-Lease program in London, and Edward R. Murrow was head of CBS news in Europe. They all developed such close ties with Churchill that they were actually considered part of his official circles. More than that, all three became romantically involved with Churchill’s daughters. The author handles this touchy situation with aplomb, sparing the reader any salacious details that would detract from her scholarly approach.

Each of the three had serious personality traits that they were able to muffle as they assisted Churchill with his decisions. All three were immensely wealthy and/or influential, they were idealistic, and their interest in the British situation was genuine. Winant was extremely shy and a poor speaker, but his boyish charm and unquestionable loyalty made him a favorite with the British people. Harriman, an industrial scion, was intensely self-centered and tended towards covert attempts to ingratiate himself with Churchill. He was refereed to as a “bum-sucker” in the book. Murrow was outspoken and given to critical comments about the US in his broadcasts and writings, something greatly appreciated by Churchill in his never ending attempts to get America involved in the war.

When America entered the war after Pearl Harbor, all three, along with Churchill and the rest of the country, were giddy with the decision. The intricate dance of collaboration performed by all the principals throughout the war, and the successful conclusion, is wonderfully chronicled in this intriguing book.

Schuyler T Wallace
Author of TIN LIZARD TALES
Olwado
Lynne Olson writes beautifully and her research is wonderful, but the most interesting part of this book to me was not the three Americans living in London during the war years about whom she titles her book. I tired a bit of reading about their various dalliances. The most interesting part of the book, from my point of view, was the relationship between Roosevelt and Churchill and the many important things about which they did not agree. Also, very interesting was her description of the relationship between the English people and the American soldiers stationed in England during the war years. Much of this was new to me even though the events took place many years ago. One can easily see how Olson's research for this book led her to write "Last Hope Island" which is a "must-read" for history buffs of World War II.
olgasmile
In reading about America's history, and recently reading several other books that deal with this time frame, I find Olson's work to be accurate beyond subjectivism and insightful as it relates to the politics of leadership and conflict. FDR was not my favorite President. America's behavior, but mostly in hindsight, leading up to WWII as she related to other free nations under attack was less than appealing and this book will give the reader some insight which may influence their current outlook. I don't judge the United States behavior "back then" with our current attitudes and perspectives (for instance, the internment of Japanese Americans; which we have tried to repay but in fairness to our past generation may well have seemed the very best solution to the extreme hate directed at those innocents) but do take notice of ideological motivations and self-serving behaviors and wonder how we might be the same today? A good book filled with both historical and personal facts and findings that flesh out a period in the US's and Britain's history that is now lost to our progeny.