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Download We Is Got Him: The Kidnapping That Changed America ePub

by Carrie Hagen

Download We Is Got Him: The Kidnapping That Changed America ePub
  • ISBN 146830058X
  • ISBN13 978-1468300581
  • Language English
  • Author Carrie Hagen
  • Publisher The Overlook Press; 1 edition (November 6, 2012)
  • Pages 336
  • Formats lrf docx mobi lit
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1334 kb
  • Size Fb2 1111 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 405

In 1874, a little boy named Charley Ross was snatched from his family's front yard in Philadelphia.

A ransom note arrived three days later, demanding $20,000 for Charley’s return. The city was about to host the United States Centennial celebration, and the mass panic surrounding the Charley Ross case plunged the nation into hysteria. The desperate search led the police to inspect every building in Philadelphia, set up saloon surveillance in New York’s notorious slums, and begin a national manhunt. With white-knuckle suspense and historical detail, Hagen vividly captures the dark side of an earlier America. Her brilliant portrayal of its criminals, detectives, politicians, spiritualists, and ordinary families will stay with the reader long after the final page.

In the non-fictional book we is got him: The Kidnapping . A local doctor recounted that on the day before the kidnapping he saw two men in a dirty buggy near the Ross’ residence

In the non-fictional book we is got him: The Kidnapping that Changed America by Carrie Hagen, she chronicles the first kidnapping for ransom in United. The kidnapping of 4-year-old Charley Ross ignited a level of national hysteria all too uncommon place during that time in the United States. The word of Charley’s disappearance quickly circulated throughout the community. A local doctor recounted that on the day before the kidnapping he saw two men in a dirty buggy near the Ross’ residence. A few days prior, a handyman remembered hearing a stranger talking to the Ross boys and offering them candy.

we is got him, Carrie Hagen's debut work, is clearly the stuff of. .And within the title, "The kidnapping that changed America ", I didn't get a true sense of HOW things changed from before July 1874 and after the kidnapping.

we is got him, Carrie Hagen's debut work, is clearly the stuff of nonfiction; it's a narrative far too heartbreaking for fiction even to invent. The story of four-year-old Charley Ross, victim of American's first documented kidnapping for ransom, presents the reader with a Charley's father Christian, a desperate parent ultimately unhinged by nineteenth-century Philadelphia's political machine playing at their own poker game with kidnappers as they manipulate this tragic case to their own mercenary concerns.

We Is Got Him: The Kidnapping that Changed America.

With white-knuckle suspense and historical detail, Hagen vividly captures the dark side of an earlier America.

The city was about to host the United States Centennial celebration, and the mass panic surrounding the Charley Ross case plunged the nation into hysteria. With white-knuckle suspense and historical detail, Hagen vividly captures the dark side of an earlier America.

We is got him. The Kidnapping that Changed America. In her first book, Philadelphia resident Hagen uses the backdrop of her city to re-create the uproar when at least two kidnappers snatched 4-year-old Charley Ross from his yard on July 1, 1874. The kidnappers issued ransom demands to Charley's father Christian, a dry-goods store owner, and Charley's mother Sarah. The author writes that before 1874, there had not been a recorded kidnapping for ransom in the United States.

Hagen presents a fascinating in-depth look at the manhunt to solve the first ransomed kidnapping in American history. In 1874, a young boy named Charley Ross was snatched from his front yard in Philadelphia. The child's father received a letter that read: ""Mr. Ross; be not uneasy you son charley bruster be all writ. we is got him and no powers on earth can deliver out of our hand.

Download PDF book format. You wil have two pay us before you git him from us, and pay us a big cent t. Philadelphia had just won the bid to host America's centennial celebration. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. We is got him : the kidnapping that changed America Carrie Hagen. The country had survived revolution, civil war, and recession, and city politicians were eager to prove the country had matured enough to survive another hundred years. What they couldn't foresee was how a child's kidnapping threatened to unravel social confidence and plunge a city into despair. 388 printed pages. Hagen skillfully narrates a saga that transcends one kidnapping, a saga tied up with the World’s Fair that was about to open in Philadelphia. This relentlessly suspenseful story of America’s first known kidnapping in nineteenth century Philadelphia is elegantly told, superbly accomplished (The Philadelphia Enquirer). In 1874, a little boy named Charley Ross was snatched from his family’s front yard in Philadelphia. Michael Capuzzo, author of The Murder Room.

Talk about We Is Got Him: The Kidnapping That Changed America


Zeli
we is got him, Carrie Hagen's debut work, is clearly the stuff of nonfiction; it's a narrative far too heartbreaking for fiction even to invent. The story of four-year-old Charley Ross, victim of American's first documented kidnapping for ransom, presents the reader with a Charley's father Christian, a desperate parent ultimately unhinged by nineteenth-century Philadelphia's political machine playing at their own poker game with kidnappers as they manipulate this tragic case to their own mercenary concerns.

Hagen gives the reader nineteenth-century Philadelphia in portrait: its pride as the cradle of an upstart nation and its rivalry in the shadow of bigger brother New York. Struggling to overcome the disunion of the Civil War and to embrace the economic boom of the Industrial Revolution, the city resonates with the graft, greed, and longing of its own government bosses preparing to host the Centennial celebration of a still-incipient nation desperately attempting to uphold a world image. Behind this celebration, Hagen presents us with two cities run by corrupt cops and petty thieves whose duplicity is reflected in the internecine wrangling of desperate city politicians. This true-life tale presents a Dickensian criminal core, a rogue's gallery of real-life figures: grasping yellow journalists, gypsy scapegoats, and physically deformed crooks, whose sweet but silent subject lies at the center - the round-faced, fair-haired Charley Ross.

From the beginning we sense that this will not end well fort the Ross family - a suspicion that becomes all but fait accompli within the first few chapters as botched ransom negotiations painfully drag on for months. Hagen's tight narrative, punctuated by judicious selections from the kidnappers' multiple ransom correspondences with the family, is at once journalistically detached yet ripe with a sad perspective that only a buffer from the past provides. By steady and intelligent degrees she creates a painfully poignant conclusion for the reader, illustrating how nearly everyone has an intense self interest in recovering the child, yet no one is able to see beyond his own personal benefit to actually recover the child. As politicians and police play the Charley Ross kidnapping case to manipulate their own endgame, so does Hagen's tense narrative play its own ransom game with the reader, never releasing us from her thrall.
Prorahun
Hagen's first book covers the little known story of the kidnapping of a four year old boy, Charles Ross. While the subject matter is fascinating, Hagen tells the story from a sociological point of view. She invokes the era and what was happening in the city of Philadelphia at the time. I did not like her way of telling the story as it became draggy in the last half of the book. She did not seem to omit a detail. Those who like details will really enjoy the book. I thought it was wordy and could have been done in about 50 fewer pages. However, the story is compelling, one that will stay with me for some time. With the caveats mentioned, I recommend the book.
Reddefender
What an engrossing tale. From the opening paragraphs describing the young victim to the year-long saga that tormented the family this is an overwhelming story. What really surprised me were how all of the elements we have now come to expect in high profile kidnappings made their debut during this case. A reward was offered, marked bills prepared, clairvoyants called upon, hoax tips abounded, newspaper media involvement, private detectives, suspicion falls on the family, and events create copycats. The research is first-rate and the writing brings 1874 to life. Author Hagen strikes a fine balance between an objective procedural and an empathetic narrative. It is so rich one may conclude it is a work of fiction.
Yalone
Although the story within is intriguing enough, it is written almost haphazardly, so much that it is difficult to follow the large cast of characters. Several, if not many, sentences are written with several subjects, to who actions are attributed - but you're not really certain who is doing or saying what! And within the title, "The kidnapping that changed America ", I didn't get a true sense of HOW things changed from before July 1874 and after the kidnapping. I would enjoy reading this story more as a chronological tale rather than the detailed study I believe this is supposed to be.
playboy
This is a fine book, presenting a compelling story well-told. One of the things I like best is the book's central and fascinating character: the city of Philadelphia. "We Is Got Him" embodies the city's splendid heritage, its touching hopes for its future, and--yes--the occasional whiff of desperation as it faces threats to making that future happen. By 1874, Philadelphia had lost the national capital to Washington, the financial capital to New York, and the literary capital to Boston. Hagen's book chronicles, superlatively, a kidnapping but also that crime's threat to what the city elders thought of as Philadelphia's chance to reclaim its position of international prominence by hosting the Centennial Exposition. In 2011, Philadelphia has different present and future hopes and threats, but the past, of course, always affects our present and our future.
Raniconne
I've now read this book twice. Once on my own soon after it came out and again this year as part of a book club. I enjoyed it even more reading and discussing with others. Some people in the book club did their own research on the topic which they brought into our discussions which made it fun to discuss our thoughts on some of the unanswered questions from the book.
I loved getting to know the characters and learning some history lessons along the way.
Ffleg
A little hard to follow at times as it involves many characters and jumps around some but the author seems well researched about the kidnapping and the history of Germantown where the kidnapping took place.
Have you ever wondered why every child's parents warns them against talking to strangers? This is the story of what is believed by many to be America's first child kidnapping for ransom. Well-written and fascinating social history illustrates the very different attitudes that most people used to have towards children generally.