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Download Secrets of the Maya ePub

by Archaeology Magazine Editors,Peter A. Young

Download Secrets of the Maya ePub
  • ISBN 1578261236
  • ISBN13 978-1578261239
  • Language English
  • Author Archaeology Magazine Editors,Peter A. Young
  • Publisher Red Brick Press (November 7, 2002)
  • Pages 280
  • Formats lrf txt lrf docx
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1473 kb
  • Size Fb2 1570 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 387

Unlock the mysteries of the Mayan world.Deep in the rain forests of South and Central America, the Mayan culture thrived for almost 4,000 years. From the earliest Mayan farmer in 2,600 BC through the thirteenth century AD, the Maya developed an elaborate society, built great cities and temples, and created the only real system of writing native to the Americas.Although many of the intricacies of the Mayan culture remain shrouded in mystery, hundreds of new discoveries have come to light in recent years, and our body of knowledge about the Maya has grown by leaps and bounds. Now, the most fascinating new discoveries have been compiled into one volume: Secrets of the Maya, a book from the editors of Archaeology Magazine.From the discovery of ancient caves used for religious rituals—including human sacrifice—to the search for the long-lost "White City," Secrets of the Maya will take readers on an exciting and surprising archaeological journey. Featuring articles on the latest research, a comprehensive time line, and a special section on Mayan hieroglyphs, Secrets of the Maya will appeal to experts and amateurs alike.

Secrets of the Maya Hardcover – November 7, 2002 The Maya culture is so rich in complex visual imagery that a verbal description of a codex, or a stela, or a mural, or a glyph is very difficult to follow, at least for me. Pictures would.

Secrets of the Maya Hardcover – November 7, 2002. The Maya culture is so rich in complex visual imagery that a verbal description of a codex, or a stela, or a mural, or a glyph is very difficult to follow, at least for me. Pictures would have helped immensely to make this book one of great value, instead of being a poorly presented advertisement for Archaeology Magazine, and not a very good one.

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Secrets of the Maya book. Unlock the mysteries of the Mayan world. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Peter A. Young (Preface). Deep in the rain forests of South and Central America, the Mayan culture thrived for almost 4,000 years.

From the earliest Mayan farmer in 2,600 BC through the thirteenth century AD, the Maya developed an elaborate society, built great cities and temples, and created the only real system of writing native to the Americas. Although many of the intricacies of the Mayan culture remain shrouded in mystery, hundreds of new discoveries have come to light in recent years, and our body of knowledge about the Maya has grown by leaps and bounds.

Home Archaeology Magazine Secrets Of The Maya.

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Talk about Secrets of the Maya


Jack
I'm an armchair Mayanist, have visited a few Maya sites in Mexico and Guatemala, and am looking forward to an in-depth AIA trip next year. In preparing for the trip, I'm reading several books on the subject. I found this book disappointing for a couple of reasons. Poor proofing is just annoying--every cross-reference to another article but one is to the wrong page, and says "cheap,"--but the real lack here is in the illustrations. The maps are small and hard to read; there isn't one good, clear map of the entire Maya region; the one photograph of Linda Schele might as well not be included; the black and white photos are of poor quality and of questionable use--do we really need a picture of Ian Graham's hand correcting a field drawing?

Some of the color photos are out of focus, and are not particularly useful to the reader. There are only four pages of them in any case. Weren't there better photos accompanying the articles when they were originally published? And when were these articles published? There is no indication of whether an article was from 1980 or 2000 (a couple of the inserts are dated, but only a couple of them), and it is important to put the information you're reading in a context of time, since the research is constantly expanding.

The Maya culture is so rich in complex visual imagery that a verbal description of a codex, or a stela, or a mural, or a glyph is very difficult to follow, at least for me. Pictures would have helped immensely to make this book one of great value, instead of being a poorly presented advertisement for Archaeology Magazine, and not a very good one.

The one good thing this book did for me was to send me to other, better written and better illustrated books by Linda Schele, Mary Ellen Miller, David Freidel,et al, some of which are listed in the bibliography, but I question the validity of a bibliography that omits Schele's co-author Miller on the Blood of Kings entry, and omits Schele and Freidel's Forest of Kings altogether.
Mori
I couldn't resist picking up _Secrets of the Maya_, with its intriguing title and the mysterious frieze decorating its cover. It turned out to be far from perfect, but well worth reading.
The book is a collection of articles about the Maya published in Archaeology magazine during the past fifteen years. The virtue of this format is that the articles provide a kind of play-by-play review of many of the major advances and changes that have taken place in our understanding of the Mayan world during this time. The major disadvantage is that a collection of articles reporting on a wide range of topics and spanning 15 years makes it very hard to piece together a coherent overview. A brief introduction by T. Patrick Culbert, emeritus professor of archaeology at the University of Arizona, helps a bit, but more was needed. Separate introductions to each of the four sections: Politics, War and Survival, Arts, Religion & Culture, Reading the Maya Past, and An Endangered History would have made a big difference, as would some kind of summation to tie it all together.
Probably the greatest advance described in the book is the breaking of the code of the intricate glyphs that cover columns and facades throughout the Mayan world. It's obvious that the task is far from complete, with scholars still arguing over interpretations. But it's equally clear that Mayan scholars have made a great deal of progress in assembling a meaningful history of the Maya based on their written records. Other major advances include the realization that the Maya were not, as was thought earlier, a peaceful society run by otherworldly theocrats. Instead (not all that surprisingly) they emerge as a dynamic, ever-changing grab-bag of city-states. They forged and broke alliances, warred with each other, exploited, changed and eventually degraded their environment, and, like the Aztecs, had their own set of strange and bloody customs. More recently, we learn, archaeologists and governments have had to try to deal with the ravages of widespread looting, and archaeologists have been attacked by armed bands intent on keeping the ruins to themselves. To their credit, at least a few Mayan scholars have begun to collaborate with Mayans living today, not just to help find or excavate sites, but to help the researchers understand and interpret what they find, as guides into the Mayan worldview, and to tap into their traditional knowledge of the medicinal properties of more than 200 species of plants.
Secrets of the Maya does have one glaring flaw--its almost total lack of illustrations. The book contains some small maps, one or two photos of archaeologists, and just nine other fairly unimpressive plates. When I have toured Maya sites, I've been overwhelmed by the impact of the massive structures, the power of the carvings, and the sheer beauty of the settings. I can't understand why the editors of this book decided not to include more pictures and better pictures. They could have brought what the authors were often laboring to describe to life.
The articles seemed to me to get better with time. I thought the best was near the end, a chapter by Tom Gidwitz featuring joint work by Culbert and two NASA scientists who used a variety of high- and low-tech approaches to surveying the swampy Mayan lowlands. They've been able to demonstrate that the ancient Maya performed enormous engineering feats to turn vast swamps into the productive farmland that was needed to support a huge population. The chapter also presents an intriguing and largely convincing history of over-exploitation of these wetlands by the Maya which may have contributed to the devastating 200-year drought that struck the entire region around 800 AD, and which clearly left the Mayan civilization extremely vulnerable to that drought.
The book has its strengths and weaknesses, but it certainly whetted my appetite for some of the books in its "further reading" list. I'm eager to find out what secrets of the Maya remain to be revealed.
Robert Adler, author of Science Firsts: From the Creation of Science to the Science of Creation (John Wiley & Sons, Sept. 2002).
Ka
I'm an armchair archaeologist and this book provided a very good, solid introduction to Mayan culture and history. Some of the information was new to me, particularly the chapter on Mayan medicine. It's a beautiful book and would make a great gift for anyone with an interest in the Mayans.