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Download The People of New France (Themes in Canadian History) ePub

by Allan Greer

Download The People of New France (Themes in Canadian History) ePub
  • ISBN 0802008267
  • ISBN13 978-0802008268
  • Language English
  • Author Allan Greer
  • Publisher University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1 edition (November 1, 1997)
  • Pages 130
  • Formats doc rtf lrf txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1451 kb
  • Size Fb2 1298 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 928

This book surveys the social history of New France. For more than a century, until the British conquest of 1759-60, France held sway over a major portion of the North American continent. In this vast territory several unique colonial societies emerged, societies which in many respects mirrored ancien regime France, but which also incorporated a major Aboriginal component.

Whereas earlier works in this field presented pre-conquest Canada as completely white and Catholic, The People of New France looks closely at other members of society as well: black slaves, English captives and Christian Iroquois of the mission villages near Montreal. The artisans and soldiers, the merchants, nobles, and priests who congregated in the towns of Montreal and Quebec are the subject of one chapter. Another chapter examines the special situation of French regime women under a legal system that recognized wives as equal owners of all family property. The author extends his analysis to French settlements around the Great Lakes and down the Mississippi Valley, and to Acadia and Ile Royale.

Greer's book, addressed to undergraduate students and general readers, provides a deeper understanding of how people lived their lives in these vanished Old-Regime societies.


Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 1997. In the mother country, the image of New France was hardly paradisiacal. The severity of the winter climate was well known and the horrors of war with the Iroquois had been widely publicized by Jesuit missionaries.

Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press, 1997. Government efforts to boost the colony's population by bringing over men bound as indentured servants or soldiers had the effect of associating emigration and servitude in the popular mind. Canada has always been regarded as a country at the end of the world," wrote an official, "and as an exile that might pass for a (sentence) of civil death.

This book surveys the social history of New France Early Canadian history. Published by Thriftbooks.

Early Canadian history. com User, 9 years ago. Students (university or higher grades of school) will find this a useful book. Its 137 pages, including bibliography and index, offer a succinct introduction to everyday life in pre-Conquest New France. A good introductory history. com User, 11 years ago.

This book surveys the social history of New France

This book surveys the social history of New France  . Whereas earlier works in this field presented pre-conquest Canada as completely white and Catholic, The People of New France looks closely at other members of society as well: black slaves, English captives and Christian Iroquois of the mission villages near Montreal. The artisans and soldiers, the merchants, nobles, and priests who congregated in the towns of Montreal and Quebec are the subject of one chapter. Another chapter examines the special situation of French regime women under a legal system that recognized wives as equal owners of all family property. For more than a century, until the British conquest of 1759-60, France held sway over a major portion of the North American continent.

Allen Greer’s book on the peoples of New France is very interesting and well written. He is able to give a good overview of the different peoples that lived within the colony of New France. He does not limit himself to European’s and natives but also slaves and servants. This is just a brief history but Greer is able to show important points that many historians would ignore. He looks at the daily lives of all different peoples of New France.

Canada: A People's History chronicles the human drama that is Canada's .

Canada: A People's History chronicles the human drama that is Canada's journey from past to present. But this fast-paced growth brings New France into ever more bitter conflict with the wealthier and more numerous - but less venturesome - British colonists to the south. The Canadian west is opened by the great fur-trading empires of the Hudson's Bay and Northwest Companies, the native people who were their indispensable allies, and bold explorers and map makers who ventured from the Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean and long-sought-for Pacific.

Volume52, Issue1, été 1998, p. 80–82. Browse the articles in this issue. It gives the book a distinction from other books on New France usually portraying it as insignificant and a failed attempt at being an empire

Allen Greer’s book on the peoples of New France is very interesting and well written. It gives the book a distinction from other books on New France usually portraying it as insignificant and a failed attempt at being an empire. The romanticism adds depth to the people’s lives, so that it is easy to understand what life was like in the colony. However the reader must be critical when reading the book due to its romanticized fashion.

Talk about The People of New France (Themes in Canadian History)


Gagas
Allen Greer’s book on the peoples of New France is very interesting and well written. He is able to give a good overview of the different peoples that lived within the colony of New France. He does not limit himself to European’s and natives but also slaves and servants. This is just a brief history but Greer is able to show important points that many historians would ignore. He looks at the daily lives of all different peoples of New France. The book is written in a very general way, so that any person could read and understand it. He does romanticize the history of New France and its people. This unlike many other histories is done very well. It gives the book a distinction from other books on New France usually portraying it as insignificant and a failed attempt at being an empire. The romanticism adds depth to the people’s lives, so that it is easy to understand what life was like in the colony. However the reader must be critical when reading the book due to its romanticized fashion. Greer at times gets caught up in what life was like in New France without pointing out problems of interpretation of sources or bias that may be involved. As well he does make generalizations, especially when referring to other colonial societies. In all it is a good book, perfect as an introduction to the study New France and no doubt gives the reader more to think about and further study regarding the people of New France.
Rit
Well written. Fast read for a piece of Canada's early days.
Bloodfire
Excellent read. Gave me good insight into life in early Canada.
DireRaven
Students (university or higher grades of school) will find this a useful book. Its 137 pages, including bibliography and index, offer a succinct introduction to everyday life in pre-Conquest New France. Allan Greer covers topics as diverse as the religious communities, capital punishment and the typical livestock of a farm.
Nilarius
Informative. A bit "vanilla" at times. But concise.
Mr.Death
"The People of New France" is a good introduction and overview of early Canadian history. Well-written, not dry or overly long. Highly recommended.