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Download Up South: Civil Rights and Black Power in Philadelphia (Politics and Culture in Modern America) ePub

by Matthew J. Countryman

Download Up South: Civil Rights and Black Power in Philadelphia (Politics and Culture in Modern America) ePub
  • ISBN 0812220021
  • ISBN13 978-0812220025
  • Language English
  • Author Matthew J. Countryman
  • Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press; 49709th edition (June 12, 2007)
  • Pages 432
  • Formats doc rtf mobi txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1275 kb
  • Size Fb2 1560 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 849

Up South traces the efforts of two generations of black Philadelphians to turn the City of Brotherly Love into a place of promise and opportunity for all. Although Philadelphia rarely appears in histories of the modern civil rights struggle, the city was home to a vibrant and groundbreaking movement for racial justice in the years between World War II and the 1970s. By broadening the chronological and geographic parameters of the civil rights movement, Up South explores the origins of civil rights liberalism, the failure of the liberal program of antidiscrimination legislation and interracial coalition-building to deliver on its promise of racial equality, and the subsequent rise of the Black Power movement.

The Philadelphia movement occurred in three stages. During the 1940s and 1950s, liberal civil rights groups in the city successfully campaigned for Philadelphia's new City Charter to be the first in the nation to include a ban on racial discrimination in municipal employment, services, and contracts. Within a decade, however, black activists in the city were leading consumer boycotts and street protests against the city's liberal establishment for failing to overcome entrenched structures of racial inequality in labor markets, residential neighborhoods, and public schools. These protests set the stage both for some of the earliest experiments in affirmative action and for the emergence of the Black Power movement in Philadelphia.

Challenging the view that it was the inflammatory rhetoric of Black Power and the rising demands of black activists that derailed the civil rights movement, Up South documents the efforts of Black Power activists in Philadelphia to construct a vital and effective social movement that combined black nationalism's analysis of racism's constitutive role in American society with a program of grassroots community organizing and empowerment. On issues ranging from public education and urban renewal to police brutality and welfare, Philadelphia's Black Power movement remade the city's political landscape. And, in contrast to the top-down middle-class leadership of traditional civil rights groups, Black Power in Philadelphia fundamentally altered the composition of black leadership in the city to include a new cohort of neighborhood-based working-class and female black community activists.


Up South deftly integrates civil rights, black power, and urban history to craft a powerful portrait of. .I read this book for a grad class about the 1960s. The book was informative about the Civil Rights movement in Philadelphia.

Up South deftly integrates civil rights, black power, and urban history to craft a powerful portrait of black activism in postwar Philadelphia. -Peniel E. Joseph, Journal of American History. of enormous accomplishment. Most people think of the South when this era is discussed, but Countryman sheds new light on protests in the urban Philadelphia area.

Up South traces the efforts of two generations of black Philadelphians to turn the City of Brotherly Love into a place of promise and .

Up South traces the efforts of two generations of black Philadelphians to turn the City of Brotherly Love into a place of promise and opportunity for all. Although Philadelphia rarely appears in histories of the modern civil rights struggle, the city was home to a vibrant and groundbreaking movement for racial justice in the years between World War II and the 1970s.

Although Philadelphia rarely appears in histories of the modern civil rights struggle, the city was home to a vibrant and groundbreaking movement for racial justice in the years between World War II and the 1970s. By bro Up South traces the efforts of two generations of black Philadelphians to turn the City of Brotherly Love into a place of promise and opportunity for all.

Up South traces the efforts of two generations of black Philadelphians to turn the City of Brotherly Love into a place . The Philadelphia movement occurred in three stages. During the 1940s and 1950s, liberal civil rights groups in the city successfully campaigned for Philadelphia's new City Charter to be the first in the nation to include a ban on racial discrimination in municipal employment, services, and contracts.

Matthew Countryman's new book, Up South, helps fill this historiographical gap, but does much more

Matthew Countryman's new book, Up South, helps fill this historiographical gap, but does much more. In his study of black politics in the city of brotherly love, Countryman demonstrates how African Americans moved from liberal politics in the late 1940s and '50s to black power in the late 1960s. Up South, part of the University of Pennsylvania Press's "Politics and Culture in Modern America" series, pushes historians to shift their geographical and chronological conception of the black rights movement. By analyzing the failures of liberal politics, it helps explain when and why black power arose in the urban North.

Up South deftly integrates civil rights, black power, and urban history to craft a powerful portrait of black . Matthew Countryman has presented us with a real treasure house in his history of Civil Rights and Black Power in the urban North. -Komozi Woodard, author of A Nation Within a Nation: Amiri Baraka and Black Power Politics.

Up South" documents the efforts of Philadelphia's Black Power activists to construct a vital and effective social movement combining analyses of racism with a program of grassroots community organizing in the context of the failure of civil rights liberalism to deliver on its promise of racial.

Up South" documents the efforts of Philadelphia's Black Power activists to construct a vital and effective social movement combining analyses of racism with a program of grassroots community organizing in the context of the failure of civil rights liberalism to deliver on its promise of racial equality.

Even so, integration took place haltingly and was realized only after the political and strategic realities of the Korean War forced the Army to allow black soldiers to fight alongside their white comrades. While the war pushed the civil rights struggle beyond national boundaries, it also revealed the persistence of racial discrimination and exposed the limits of interracial solidarity.

With its keen insights into one of the most controversial decades in American history, Peace and Freedom recaptures the immediacy and importance of the time. The audiobook is published by University of Pennsylvania Press.

Talk about Up South: Civil Rights and Black Power in Philadelphia (Politics and Culture in Modern America)


Dilkree
This book provides significant insight into the lives and relationships of Black leaders, politicians, community activists and just plain folk who were instrumental in bringing about change in Philadelphia during this period. It sheds light on some activities from a different perspective than I had on some people and activities - as I had viewed them during that time. While it is understood that the writer is sharing his thoughts and the perspectives of those he interviewed, it is useful for anyone who lived in Philadelphia to reflect on what is reported to have happened and one's own experiences. It is most helpful if one has the opportunity to speak with any of the individuals identified in the book and get their perspective. A must-read, if you are interested in Black activism in Philadelphia during any period of time.
Siralune
I read this book for a grad class about the 1960s. The book was informative about the Civil Rights movement in Philadelphia. Most people think of the South when this era is discussed, but Countryman sheds new light on protests in the urban Philadelphia area. The general criticisms we discussed in class (about this book) were that some of his statistical data seemed slightly (and probably unintentionally) skewed to support his thesis. Also, Countryman makes a point of the important roles women played, yet relegates most women to a smaller chapter mostly involving poverty activism and welfare rights. This was my biggest criticism, if he didn't have enough information on women's involvement, he should have left out that statement about their importance. But having made the claim, Countryman didn't back it up with anything more than a few short examples.
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