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Download The Iron Thorn: The Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons ePub

by Carey Robinson

Download The Iron Thorn: The Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons ePub
  • ISBN 9766101590
  • ISBN13 978-9766101596
  • Language English
  • Author Carey Robinson
  • Publisher LMH Publishing Company (December 1, 1993)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats txt lit lrf mobi
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1946 kb
  • Size Fb2 1653 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 981

The revised and greatly expanded edition of the well-known book, The Fighting Maroons of Jamaica (Collins & Sangster 1969), vividly describes the Maroons' war against the British in Jamaica. Benefiting from twenty years of additional thorough research, Carey Robinson's new work gives explicit details of the lifestyles and fighting tactics of both forces. The author eloquently describes the heroism and genius of the Maroons, and their mastery of guerilla warfare. Carey Robinson has made almost a lifetime study of Jamaica's history, from the "people's perspective". He has written numerous radio and television scripts, stage plays and films on historical themes. The Fighting Maroons of Jamaica was his first book, followed by Fight For Freedom which was published by Kingston Publishers in 1987. About the Author Historian Carey Robinson has worked as a Journalist (the Daily Gleaner, Spotlight, News Magazine) and broadcaster (Radio Jamaica and the Government's Public Relations Office). At the time of Independence he was put in charge of the Public Relations Office, which was shortly after renamed the Jamaica Information Service (JIS). Mr. Robinson headed JIS until 1971 when he was made General Manager of the Jamaica Broadcasting Corporation; a post which he would again hold in 1987. He subsequently served overseas in Jamaican embassies in Washington D.C. and Mexico City, headed the division of art and culture in the office of the Prime Minister, and was Executive Director of the Jamaica National Heritage Trust. At present he produces and directs a weekly television programme which focuses primarily on rural Jamaica. Mr. Robinson has done extensive research into early Maroon history and authored The Fighting Maroons of Jamaica, and its expanded version The Iron Thorn. He is the recipient of a Silver Musgrave Medal, the award of Commander of the Order of Distinction and the Press Association of Jamaica's Life Time award for Outstanding Public Service in television production. Mr. Robinson has been studying Jamaica's history for well over thirty years believing that only through such a study can the character and needs of the Jamaican people be really understood.

The Iron Thorn's" subtitle "Defeat of the British" overstates the event, but the 150-year struggle of the escaped slaves called the Maroons against the colonial government of Jamaica illuminates many aspects of both slavery and of British colonial administration.

The Iron Thorn's" subtitle "Defeat of the British" overstates the event, but the 150-year struggle of the escaped slaves called the Maroons against the colonial government of Jamaica illuminates many aspects of both slavery and of British colonial administration. The Maroons - Carey Robinson sometimes calls them Coromantees, but it is not clear that all of them derived from that tribe - did not revolt against Spanish slavery but objected to the British and took to the mountains

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The Iron Torn : The Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons. The author eloquently describes the heroism and genius of the Maroons, and their mastery of gureilla warfare.

Explore books by Carey Robinson with our selection at Waterstones. com Iron Thorn: Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons (Hardback). Iron Thorn: Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons (Hardback). View basket Checkout. Memoirs Of A Jamaican Media Man (Paperback). The Rise And Fall Of Falmouth Jamaica (Hardback).

The Iron Thorn: The Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons, describes the Maroons' war against the British in Jamaica.

Queen Nanny, Grandy Nanny or Nanny (c. 1686 – c. 1755), led a community of formerly enslaved Africans called the Windward Maroons. In the early 18th century, they fought a multi-year war against British colonizers in Jamaica

Queen Nanny, Grandy Nanny or Nanny (c. In the early 18th century, they fought a multi-year war against British colonizers in Jamaica. Queen Nanny was born in what is today Ghana of the Akan or Ashanti people. According to the oral tradition and at least one documentary source, she was never enslaved. Although widely assumed that she arrived in Jamaica as a slave, how she arrived in Jamaica is not certain.

Origins of the Jamaican Maroons. The Jamaican Maroons are often described as enslaved Africans and persons of noticeable African descent who ran away or escaped from their masters or owners to acquire and preserve their freedom. Carey Robinson has noted that, within a forty year period of the first struggle between the Maroons and the English, �the Assembly was to pass 44 acts and spend �240,000 in its attempts at suppression�. Also, Bryan Edwards, prominent planter/ historian of the time wrote that . .they plundered all around them, and caused several plantations to be thrown.

Jamaican Maroons descend from maroons, Africans who escaped from slavery unto the island of Jamaica and established free communities in the mountainous interior, primarily in the eastern parishes. Escaped Africans who were enslaved during Spanish rule over Jamaica (1493–1656) may have been the first to develop such refugee communities. The British, who invaded the island in 1655, expanded the importation of slaves to support their extensive development of sugar-cane plantations.

The history books recount Nanny as a freedom fighter up in the mountains of Nanny Town, a soldier who fought and beguiled the British until her . The Iron Thorn: The defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons. LMH Publishing Ltd. 1993.

The history books recount Nanny as a freedom fighter up in the mountains of Nanny Town, a soldier who fought and beguiled the British until her courageous death in the 1750’s.

the defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons. 1st ed. by Carey Robinson. Parts of this volume were originally published as The fighting maroons of Jamaica, by William Collins and Sangster (Jamaica) Lt. 1969"-T. Published 1993 by Kingston Publishers Ltd. in Kingston, Jamaica. 273 p. : Number of pages.

Talk about The Iron Thorn: The Defeat of the British by the Jamaican Maroons


Lianeni
We'll put together book !
Demonstrated a lot of the Jamaican history.
Zololmaran
Carey Robinson's "The Iron Thorn" is a well-written, well-researched history of the Maroons of Jamaica. Robinson starts with the Spanish Colonization of the island in 1509 and discusses the relatively light bondage of the African slaves during Spanish colonial rule. He then describes the English invasion in 1655 and the desperate struggle for the island by the united forces of the Spanish and their now freed African slaves.
The author brings to life the development of the escaped Spanish slaves into the fighting Maroons. We see these men and women warriors hiding out in the cockpit jungle, establishing and defending their towns against the British Army. As Robinson describes it, we cannot help but admire these men and women fighting for their freedom and often winning against a superior force.
Robinson recounts the struggle of the British governors in dealing with the Maroon problem, while hampered by a demoralized army, runaway slaves, discontent, unreliable indentured servants, and deserting soldiers.
The author introduces us to the great Maroon chiefs: the commanding Cudjoe, Quao the mighty hunter, the magnificent Smith, and the mysterious Nanny, Queen and motivator of the Maroons. Robinson takes us into the settlements and towns of these freedom fighters and allows us to witness the battles to keep them. Robinson explains the decisions of each chief and illustrates how each plan led to defeat or victory.
Although, the focus of this book is the Maroons, the author also presents us with a history of Jamaica from the fifteen hundreds until the late eighteen hundreds. He explores the motives and fears of the British governors and planters as they strove to create a society free of rebellious slaves and frequent Maroon attacks. In the Epilogue, Robinson also takes a brief look at the modern Maroons and the legacy they have given Jamaica.
I found this book very interesting. The narrative did become dry at times, especially when the author felt compelled to describe in detail the arms, ammunition, and provisions it took to fight various battles. However, other parts of the book, such as the descriptions of the actual battles, the myths and legends surrounding these warriors, I found fascinating.
This book will hold the attention of both people interested in Jamaican or Caribbean history and those interested in the birth of a culture. The Maroons of Jamaica still exist although in lesser numbers than they once did. They dwell in peace in their historical towns and as part of the regular population of the country. Their undefeatable spirit and quest for freedom still exists in all Jamaicans.
Kanek
"The Iron Thorn's" subtitle "Defeat of the British" overstates the event, but the 150-year struggle of the escaped slaves called the Maroons against the colonial government of Jamaica illuminates many aspects of both slavery and of British colonial administration.

The Maroons -- Carey Robinson sometimes calls them Coromantees, but it is not clear that all of them derived from that tribe -- did not revolt against Spanish slavery but objected to the British and took to the mountains.

The Maroons were never numerous, so the colonial government vacillated between hunting them and buying them off. The Maroons themselves hired out to capture other runaway slaves, as a protective device to make themselves useful to the British.

The "defeat" of the British amounted to ambushes of some half-hearted expeditions by armed slaves (Black Shots), poorly trained local militia and unenthusiastic (mostly Irish) regulars. In the 1740s, a peace was declared and the Maroons were given a little land in exchange for a promise not to harbor runaway slaves.

The colonial government chipped away at the rights of these free Africans until they revolted again. By this time, black revolutionaries inspired by the French Revolution were a much more serious threat to white Jamaica, not to mention the possibility that the French would use them as they had the Irish to attack the English. Thus, for the first time the British mounted a serious military campaign against the Maroons. Robinson is weakest in not placing the second Maroon war into this context.

As we have seen many times since (in Afghanistan now, for example), it is very expensive to put down guerrillas. However, the British were not defeated the second time, and the most active of the Maroons were (in violation of an armistice) transported, first to Nova Scotia, later to Sierra Leone. Four small settlements of pacified Maroons survive until today, with some minor local privileges. Robinson says they still make the best jerk pork and "the strength and spirit of the Maroons are no longer the exclusive property of the mountain strongholds; they belong to all Jamaica."

Considering the violence of Jamaican politics, that is not obviously a wholly good thing; and considering the recent history of Sierra Leone, the descendants of the Maroons may well wish that their ancestors had attained their ardent desire to return to Jamaica.

Although fully sympathetic to the Maroons, Carey Robinson's history is judiciously fair to all sides, although neglectful of the bigger context of the English and Africans in the Caribbean.
just one girl
The book describes the Guerrilla wars with the British and the Maroons in Jamaica in the 18th century. I like the account although it is a bit dry in some parts.