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Download The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City (Southern Dissent) ePub

by Gregory Mixon

Download The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City (Southern Dissent) ePub
  • ISBN 081302787X
  • ISBN13 978-0813027876
  • Language English
  • Author Gregory Mixon
  • Publisher University Press of Florida; 1st edition (December 31, 2004)
  • Pages 208
  • Formats doc lrf lrf docx
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Americas
  • Size ePub 1840 kb
  • Size Fb2 1946 kb
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 856

Gregory Mixon traces the roots of the Atlanta Riot of 1906, exploring the intricate political, social, and urban conditions that led to one of the defining events of race relations in southern and African-American history. On September 22, 1906, several thousand white Atlantans rioted, ostensibly because they believed that black men had committed "repeated assaults on the white women of Fulton County," according to newspapers at the time. Four days after the massacre began, 32 people had died and 70 were wounded.

Gregory Mixon traces the roots of the Atlanta Riot of 1906, exploring the intricate political, social, and urban conditions that led to one of the defining events of race relations in southern and African-American history.

Gregory Mixon traces the roots of the Atlanta Riot of 1906, exploring the intricate political, social, and urban conditions that led to one of the defining events of race relations in southern and African-American history. On September 22, 1906, several thousand white Atlantans rioted, ostensibly because they believed that black men had committed "repeated assaults on the white women of Fulton County," according to newspapers at the time. Four days after the massacre began, 32 people had died and 70 were wounded.

197 p. ; 24 cm. Includes bibliographical references (p. -188) and index. Prologue: White elite control, Black urban mobility, and working white women - Atlanta: the city of progress - "If folks don't treat me right": Atlanta's white working classes - African Americans in Atlanta - "Sowing dragon's teeth": Watson, Hardwick, and progressive reform, 1904-1906 - "The seeds of incendiarism": The gubernatorial campaign of 1905-1906.

The Atlanta Riot book . Gregory Mixon traces the roots of the Atlanta Riot of 1906, exploring the intricate political, social, and urban conditions that led to one of the defining events of race relations in southern and African-American history. As Atlanta's elite crafted new forms of segregation and modes of disempowering blacks (and also working-class whites), Mixon says, their machinations led directly to the tragedy.

The Institute fit well with the work Dr. Mixon was doing on his second book on African American militiamen in Georgia, 1865-1905″ . The Political Career of Henry A. Rucker: A Survivor in a New South City, Atlanta History: A Journal of Georgia and the South 45(Summer 2001): 4-26. Mixon was doing on his second book on African American militiamen in Georgia, 1865-1905″ and teaching the late nineteenth and twentieth century. The Institute was sponsored by Dr. Skip Gates, Director of the DuBois Institute and Co-Directed by Dr. Patricia Sullivan-University of South Carolina and Dr. Waldo Martin-University of California. Good Negro-Bad Negro’: The Dynamics of Race and Class in Atlanta During The Era of the 1906 Riot, Georgia Historical Quarterly 81(Fall 1997): 593-621.

The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City .

The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City (Southern Dissent) by Gregory Mixon. The book raises concerns of interest not only to archaeologists but also to those in law, politics, anthropology, environmental studies, and related fields. It revives the critical debate concerning significance and value while emphasizing innovations in both theory and practice in what has become in the 21st century an increasingly diverse discipline.

In The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City, University of North Carolina history professor Gregory Mixon writes about the ways in which race relations at the beginning of the twentieth century were revealed in the brutal violence that tore Atlanta, Georgia.

In The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City, University of North Carolina history professor Gregory Mixon writes about the ways in which race relations at the beginning of the twentieth century were revealed in the brutal violence that tore Atlanta, Georgia, apart in late September, 1906. On the night of 22 September 1906, Atlanta, Georgia, jewel city of the ‘New South,’ exploded in an orgy of racial violence," explained Oscar R. Williams in the Journal of African American History.

The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City (Southern Dissent) .

The term riots, associated with cities, evokes the racial riots in American cities during the 1960s and those in Los Angeles in 1992 . The Atlanta Riot: Race, Class, and Violence in a New South City – Gregory Mixon. December 2006 · Historian.

The term riots, associated with cities, evokes the racial riots in American cities during the 1960s and those in Los Angeles in 1992, images of which have. been seen all over the world.

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