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Download Marginality and Subversion in Korea: The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies) ePub

by Sun Joo Kim

Download Marginality and Subversion in Korea: The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies) ePub
  • ISBN 0295986840
  • ISBN13 978-0295986845
  • Language English
  • Author Sun Joo Kim
  • Publisher University of Washington Press (April 15, 2007)
  • Pages 304
  • Formats lit rtf azw txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Asia
  • Size ePub 1186 kb
  • Size Fb2 1924 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 882

In the history of Korea, the nineteenth century is often considered an age of popular rebellions. Scholarly approaches have typically pointed to these rebellions as evidence of the progressive direction of the period, often using the theory of class struggle as an analytical framework. In Marginality and Subversion in Korea, Sun Joo Kim argues that a close reading of the actors and circumstances involved in one of the century's major rebellions, the Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812, leads instead to more complex conclusions. Drawing from primary sources in Korean, Japanese, and classical Chinese, this book is the most extensive study in the English language of any of the major nineteenth-century rebellions in Korea. Whereas previous research has focused on economic and landlord-tenant tensions, suggesting that class animosity was the dominant feature in the political behavior of peasants, Sun Joo Kim explores the role of embittered local elites in providing vital support in the early stages to spur social change that would benefit these elites as much as the peasant class. Later, however, many of these same elites would rally to the side of the state, providing military and material contributions to help put down the rebellion. Kim explains why these opportunistic elites became discontented with the state in the scramble for power, prestige, and scarce resources, and why many ultimately worked to rescue and reinforce the Choson dynasty and the Confucian ideology that would prevail for another one hundred years. This sophisticated, groundbreaking study will be essential reading for historians and scholars of Korean studies, as well as those interested in early modern East Asia, social transformation, rebellions, and revolutions.

Kim's thorough analysis of the 1812 Rebellion's cause and events, the players involved, agendas or self-interests .

However, in this book, Sun Joo Kim rebuts this older historiography by presenting the rebellion as a regional affair stemming from a combination of political marginalization, state intrusion in the local economy, local immiseration, and subversive ideology.

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In Marginality and Subversion in Korea, Sun Joo Kim argues that a close reading of the actors and circumstances involved in one of the century's major rebellions, the Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812, leads instead to more complex conclusions.

Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies). This book shakes off a lot of politically motivated theories about why and how the Hong Kyongnae Rebellion happened, but it fails to replace them with a strong argument.

Marginality and Subversion in Korea: The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. 0295986840 (ISBN13: 9780295986845).

This series is published by the University of Washington Press. UW Center for Korea Studies Publication Series is a series devoted to conference volumes and other manuscripts such as memoirs

The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812. Sun Joo Kim is professor of Korean history at Harvard University

The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812. By Sun Joo Kim. University of Washington Press. In the history of Korea, the nineteenth century is often considered an age of popular rebellions. Sun Joo Kim is professor of Korean history at Harvard University.

Hong Kyŏng-Nae Incident, 1811-1812. Regional discrimination and the Hong Kyŏngnae rebellion. Nation, class, and region in the study of the Hong Kyŏngnae rebellion. Korea - History - 1637-1864. The economic context of the Hong Kyŏngnae rebellion. Prophecy and popular rebellion. Part II. The Hong Kyŏngnae rebellion of 1812. Leadership and preparation. Rebels and counterrebels. Rebels on the defense. xiii, 294 p. : il. maps ; 24 cm.

Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.

Recommend this journal. The Journal of Asian Studies.

and carried out the rebellion of 1812.

Talk about Marginality and Subversion in Korea: The Hong Kyongnae Rebellion of 1812 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies)


Cel
This book was made better by the fact I had waited for it for several months because the seller I originally bought it from took my money and never sent the book so I had to buy it directly from Amazon. the author spent most of the book talking about early 19th century Korean life for peasants and economics contributing to the failed rebellion. the actual rebellion, battles, and suppression was also talked about. a good read.
JUST DO IT
Following a relatively prosperous and stable eighteenth century, the Korean Choson dynasty sank into a period of political turmoil and social unrest. In the capital city of Seoul, a small number of royal in-law clans monopolized political power, while in the countryside, corrupt administrators exploited a Korean peasantry already overburdened by a series of poor harvests. Local unrest ensued, racking the nineteenth century with a succession of violent revolts. The first of these nineteenth-century uprisings, the Hong Ky'ngnae Rebellion of 1812, has often been characterized by Korean historians as a "peasant rebellion" stemming from long-term socio-economic changes in Korean society. Such historiography, of course, corresponded well with the nationalistic and progressive leanings of many past South Korean scholars.

However, in this book, Sun Joo Kim rebuts this older historiography by presenting the rebellion as a regional affair stemming from a combination of political marginalization, state intrusion in the local economy, local immiseration, and subversive ideology. Kim thus rescues the local from the nation, as she sees the rebellion not simply as representative of grander national or socio-economic trends but also as a regional event that encapsulates the uniqueness of northern Korean society during the Chos'n era. In this way, Kim admirably grants significant historical agency to various local personalities who both supported and opposed the rebellion, as well as highlighting the importance of potentially subversive ideologies, such as geomancy, that have often been ignored by past historians.

Furthermore, this work is important not only for scholars of Korean history, but also those interested in comparative peasant rebellions and social history. In the book, Kim displays an excellent grasp of sociological theory, and she definitely augments the academic literature on peasant rebellion pioneered by Barrington Moore and Theda Skocpol. Kim's admirable synthesis of regional conditions and broader structural patterns helps us understand not only the importance of local conditions, but also the limiting factors that prevent localized rebellions from expanding into dynasty-toppling revolutions. After all, all great revolutions, including the French, Russian, and American ones, began as local uprisings; their greater significance came later, via military conquest, ideological dissemination, and the victorious revolutionaries' own pens.