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Download Army of Francis Joseph (Central European Studies) ePub

by Gunther E. Rothenberg

Download Army of Francis Joseph (Central European Studies) ePub
  • ISBN 1557531455
  • ISBN13 978-1557531452
  • Language English
  • Author Gunther E. Rothenberg
  • Publisher Purdue University Press; First Thus edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Pages 316
  • Formats rtf azw mbr lit
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Europe
  • Size ePub 1324 kb
  • Size Fb2 1171 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 466

The army was perhaps the most important single institution in the multinational empire of the Hapsburgs. The Austro-Hungarian dynasty survived through the military power it could command, and the rise and fall of the fortress of the Hapsburgs were mirrored accurately in the state of its military establishment. It was in the army alone, with its common language, ideals, and loyalty, that the concept of a great empire headed by an emperor was even partially translated into reality. But in an age of nationalism, the army alone could not save the multinational state. Tradition and circumstance cast it into the role of a loyal servant the Emperor Francis Joseph and his dynasty, a role which proved inadequate to deal with the problems of the age. Rothenberg's work is the first analytical, full-length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918. He considers campaigns, battles, and leaders, but places his main emphasis on analyses of the overall developments in the military establishment, its role in foreign and internal policy, and above all on its struggle against the disintegration of the empire under the strain of growing national division.


The Army of Francis Joseph is a scholarly examination of the Hapsburg (Austrian) army during the period 1815-1918.

The Army of Francis Joseph is a scholarly examination of the Hapsburg (Austrian) army during the period 1815-1918. This army was primarily designed to safeguard the stability of the Hapsburg Dynasty and during this period, the Dynasty was primarily reflected in the 68-year reign of the Emperor Francis Joseph. Gunther E. Rothenberg, a professor at Purdue University, is an acknowledged expert on the Austrian military and he has unearthed a wealth of information from Austrian archives about this army.

Rothenberg's work is the first analytical, full-length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918. He considers campaigns, battles, and leaders, but places his main emphasis on analyses of the overall developments in the military establishment, its role in foreign and internal policy, and above all on its struggle against the disintegration of the empire under the strain of growing national division.

Central European History.

He changed the widespread perception of Archduke Charles' military acumen. A masterful historian, Rothenberg was known furthermore as an eminently fair scholar Personal life and family. His first marriage in 1952 ended in a 1967 divorce. Central European History.

Central European Studies. By (author) Gunther E. Rothenberg. Rothenberg's work in the first analytical, full, length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918. Format Paperback 312 pages.

Przeczytaj go w aplikacji Książki Google Play na komputerze albo na urządzeniu z Androidem lub iOS. Pobierz, by czytać offline. Gunther Rothenberg was the world's leading authority on the Napoleonic Wars. He served with the British, Israeli and US Military and was Professor of History at Purdue University in the USA. He was the leading English-speaking historian of warfare in the German-speaking lands. His many distinguished works include The Army of Francis Joseph and The Hapsburg Military Frontier.

Army of Francis Joseph. Series: Central European Studies. eISBN: 978-1-61249-067-0. Published by: Purdue University Press.

Army of Francis Joseph (Central European Studies). Seller Inventory AAC9781557531452. Published by Purdue University Press (1999). ISBN 10: 1557531455 ISBN 13: 9781557531452. More information about this seller Contact this seller.

Gunther E. Furthermore, the examination of Austria-Hungary's security situation from 1867-1914 is critical in understanding much of the political and military background to the First World War.

Rothenberg's work in the first analytical, full-length study of the army of Francis Joseph throughout its history from 1815-1918. Gunther Erich Rothenberg was an internationally known military historian, best known for his publications on the Habsburg military and Napoleonic Wars. Books by Gunther E.

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Kabandis
The Army of Francis Joseph is a scholarly examination of the Hapsburg (Austrian) army during the period 1815-1918. This army was primarily designed to safeguard the stability of the Hapsburg Dynasty and during this period, the Dynasty was primarily reflected in the 68-year reign of the Emperor Francis Joseph. Gunther E. Rothenberg, a professor at Purdue University, is an acknowledged expert on the Austrian military and he has unearthed a wealth of information from Austrian archives about this heretofore-neglected army. Furthermore, the examination of Austria-Hungary's security situation from 1867-1914 is critical in understanding much of the political and military background to the First World War. Rothenberg concludes that in the end, while the Hapsburg army was never among the best armies in Europe, it fought hard and did it's professional duty to the dynasty despite difficult circumstances.
The Army of Francis Joseph consists of fourteen chapters and an epilogue. The author also provides a detailed list of sources and endnotes. However, the lack of any maps, charts or photographs does not make this a "user-friendly" book. For example, while the author provides considerable data in the text on important items like Austrian military budgets, army strengths, and ethnic composition of the military, he does not compile this information into tables or charts. Thus if the reader wants to determine how Austrian military spending changed over the 19th Century or the army demographics changed, one must be prepared to flip a great many pages and keep a notepad handy. While the author's intent was an organizational study rather than a campaign history, a few maps of the main campaign areas would have been appreciated. Professor Rothenberg went to a great deal of effort to assemble this fine study, but it is unfortunately not well packaged. Furthermore, the middle part of the book - which mostly concerns Hungarian nationalist agitation and the establishment of the Dual Monarchy - is extremely tedious and slow. Essentially, this book is not for novices and should only be read by someone with considerable background and interest in this period. That being said, this book is also indispensable for understanding Austrian participation in the First World War.
Reading Rothenberg's book, it is hard to feel sorry that the Hapsburg Dynasty and its army were consigned to the dustbin of history. The Army High Command was typically over-age and almost suicidal in its resistance to doctrinal or technological innovation. The leadership resisted the creation of an effective general staff organization despite being taught hard lessons by the Prussian General Staff in the disastrous Six Weeks War of 1866. New technologies, such as breech-loading rifles, modern artillery, and aircraft were consistently denied funds and approval. In one instance, the aged Emperor Francis Joseph stated that armored vehicles would never have any military value after a prototype spooked his horse at a demonstration. Indeed, despite the well-known construction of a handful of super-heavy artillery pieces by the Skoda firm, the Hapsburg army never relied on technological or doctrinal innovation for its combat power. Instead, the Hapsburg leadership maintained an antiquated fixation on bayonet attacks and massed cavalry charges up to the start of the First World War. The emphasis on physical bravery did produce a tough army that was able to endure a steady diet of defeats in most of its wars, but the Hapsburg army had very few victories to its credit during this period.
Rothenberg's book also sheds much light on neglected aspects of 19th Century military history, such as the suppression of the Revolutions of 1848, which hit Austria hard and required nearly two years to fully subdue. The Austrian occupation of Bosnia in 1878 was a major operation that cost the Hapsburg army over 5,000 casualties. Austrian leaders like General Conrad, Crown Prince Rudolf and the Archduke Francis Ferdinand also appear in much greater detail in these pages compared to standard accounts. After reviewing the combination of bigotry, idiocy and reactionary attitudes in Francis Ferdinand, few readers will mourn his assassination. Conrad, the Austrian Chief of Staff, is also cut down to size in this account; on the one hand, he pressed for reforms, but on the other hand his actual decisions resulted in one catastrophe after another.
The fate of the Hapsburg Dynasty was inherently tied up with the strength of its army, and this army steadily deteriorated in relation to the other great powers during the last half of the 19th Century. Rothenberg cites two primary factors for this military decline: limited budgets and an inability to fully utilize the empire's manpower resources. During the entire period 1870-1914, Austria-Hungary was spending less than half the amount on defense that the other great powers were spending; Rothenberg attributes this partly to an anemic economy, partly to parsimony by a divided legislature but primarily due to the fact that the army was intended for regime security. Indeed, during much of this period the Hapsburgs were more focused on external security missions than matching foreign enemies. Furthermore, the nationalities problem - particularly with the Hungarians - consistently undermined the effectiveness of the Hapsburg army. One of the few advantages that the Hapsburg Empire enjoyed - a large and growing population - was negated by limited conscription and lack of an effective reserve system.
Given the inherent weaknesses in the Hapsburg military system, it is a wonder that Austria-Hungary pursued such aggressive policies in the decades prior to the First World War. The empire was constantly confronted with real or imagined threats of war with Italy, Russia and Serbia after 1870 and Austrian leaders frequently beat the drum for pre-emptive attacks. Germany was enticed into supporting aggressive Austrian Balkan policies well before 1914 and this only further emboldened the regime. Essentially, Rothenberg asserts that the monarchy's leadership sensed that the dynasty's days were numbered and sought to utilize their dwindling military resources to stave off disintegration, although it was this preference for active measures that brought about the conditions for a general European war.
Umge
This book covers the roughly 100 years of the history and evolution - or lack thereof - of the Austro-Hungarian Army. The main focus is or course on the 70 years of Franz Joseph's reign. The book deals with the military as well as the political/ethnic problems which the army faced during these years. And also the technological problems the army faced trying to stay current with other great powers while at the same time clinging steadfastly to traditions and practices which were becoming not only obsolescent but a detriment to the sound functioning of the army. All in all a very good book. I highly recommend it.
Golkree
I carried a battered old hardbound copy of Gunther Rothenberg's "The Army of Francis Joseph" with me all through the days when I was finishing my doctoral thesis. It was always there on my table in the Vienna Kriegsarchiv while I was researching the nationality issue in the k.-u.-k. armies. Rothenberg's book was-- and remains --an invaluable introduction to the armies of the later Habsburg Monarchy.

I will agree with other reviewers here that the book is sadly lacking in maps and diagrams and charts, and Rothenberg neglects the economic reasons for the stagnation of the Monarchy's armies from the 1880s onward. He also gives insufficient attention to the changing demographics of the army and to the attitudes of the high command to the nationalities wearing the emperor's coat. Rothenberg hints at, but does not sufficiently expand on the despair that settled on the army's generals after 1900--- the growing conviction that dissolution and defeat were inevitable, embodied in a flurry of doomsaying books (e.g., "Unser Letzter Krieg") appearing after the Hungarian crisis of 1905. Rothenberg's account of the early years of Francis Joseph's reign needs revising in light of Alan Sked's account of nationalism and desertion rates of Hungarian and Italian troops in 1848/49. Rothenberg in general neglects the political context of the Monarchy when describing the forces shaping military decisions.

Nonetheless--- Rothenberg's book is still the best introduction to the unjustly neglected imperial-and-royal armies, and gives due credit to the tenacity of the Monarchy's forces in the Great War and the loyalty of its soldiers. Almost twenty years on, I'd still carry a copy with me everyday should I go back to the Kriegsarchiv--- there is no better introduction in English to the structure and personalities and events of the Monarchy's armies in the last seventy years of its existence.