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Download The Inheritance of Rome: A History of Europe from 400 to 1000 ePub

by Chris Wickahm

Download The Inheritance of Rome: A History of Europe from 400 to 1000 ePub
  • ISBN 0140290141
  • ISBN13 978-0140290141
  • Language English
  • Author Chris Wickahm
  • Publisher Penguin UK; First Edition edition (March 2, 2010)
  • Pages 400
  • Formats lrf mobi txt azw
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Europe
  • Size ePub 1929 kb
  • Size Fb2 1125 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 873

'The Penguin History of Europe series ... is one of contemporary publishing's great projects' New Statesman The world known as the 'Dark Ages', often seen as a time of barbarism, was in fact the crucible in which modern Europe would be created. Chris Wickham's acclaimed history shows how this period, encompassing peoples such as Goths, Franks, Vandals, Byzantines, Arabs, Anglo-Saxons and Vikings, was central to the development of our history and culture. From the collapse of the Roman Empire to the establishment of new European states, and from Ireland to Constantinople, the Baltic to the Mediterranean, this landmark work makes sense of a time of invasion and turbulence, but also of continuity, creativity and achievement.

Chris Wickham is Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College. I love history books but I don't read them as a professional academic; I am also expecting to be engaged.

Chris Wickham is Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College. His book Framing the Middle Ages, which was published in 2005, won the Wolfson Prize, the Deutscher Memorial Prize and the James Henry Breasted Prize of the American Historical Association. He taught for many years at the University of Birmingham and is a Fellow of the British Academy. Paperback: 400 pages. And engaging the book is not. Quickly you find yourself re-reading the same paragraph three times.

The Inheritance of Rome book. Chris Wickham's "The Inheritance of Rome: Illuminating the Dark Ages" is a very good and witty survey of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages that shatters many kinds of misconceptions on the period, even if I think it's at some points overrated.

The Inheritance of Rome is a work of remarkable scope and ambition. Drawing on a wealth of new material, it is a book which will transform its many readers’ ideas about the crucible in which Europe would in the end be created

The Inheritance of Rome is a work of remarkable scope and ambition. Drawing on a wealth of new material, it is a book which will transform its many readers’ ideas about the crucible in which Europe would in the end be created

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Includes bibliographical references and index. Drawing on a wealth of new material and featuring a thoughtful synthesis of historical and archaeological approaches, Wickham argues that these centuries were critical in the formulation of European identity. Far from being a "middle" period between more significant epochs, this age has much to tell us in its own right about the progress of culture and the development of political thought.

II: CHRIS WICKHAM The Inheritance of Rome: A History. of Europe from 400 to 1000. III: WILLIAM JORDAN Europe in the High Middle Ages. IV: ANTHONY GRAFTON Renaissance Europe, 1350-1517. V: MARK GREENGRASS Reformation Europe, 1515-1648.

Mobile version (beta). The Inheritance of Rome: A History of Europe from 400 to 1000. Download (epub, . 2 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Prizewinning historian Chris Wickham defies the conventional view of the Dark Ages in European history with a. .The Inheritance of Rome brilliantly presents a fresh understanding of the crucible in which Europe would ultimately be created.

Drawing on a wealth of new material and featuring a thoughtful synthesis of historical and archaeological approaches, Wickham argues that these centuries were critical in the formulation of European identity.

Indeed, the breadth of The Inheritance of Rome is astounding. That fact alone demonstrates how much the cultures of Europe and the Middle East inherited from Rome. The story of the rise of the ‘Abbasid Caliphate in Baghdad unfolds alongside the contemporary narratives of French monks and Viking raiders. In one St Francis Magazine is published by Arab Vision and Interserve 46 St Francis Magazine Vol 10, No 3 August 2014 way or another, all of these polities and places inherited from Rome, although Western Europe and Byzantium did so most directly and clearly. As a historian, I am interested in the Later Roman Empire, especially Italy and Gaul (France).

The Inheritance of Rome" is a work of remarkable scope and ambition. Chris Wickham is Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College

The Inheritance of Rome" is a work of remarkable scope and ambition. Drawing on a wealth of new material, it is a book which will transform its many readers' ideas about the crucible in which Europe would in the end be created. Chris Wickham is Chichele Professor of Medieval History at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College.

Talk about The Inheritance of Rome: A History of Europe from 400 to 1000


Murn
After reading Wickham's Medieval Europe, I thought that I'd give him another chance and read on his area of greatest expertise, the early middle ages. Well, I probably should not have. First, it is boring. I love history books but I don't read them as a professional academic; I am also expecting to be engaged. And engaging the book is not. Quickly you find yourself re-reading the same paragraph three times. Second, I do not agree with the thesis that the Roman empire did not so much collapse as evolve. In fact, here, the author contradicts himself from the get-go. Indeed, all the evidence that he cites, in details, contradicts this idea. Economic collapse, profound societal change, etc. How does that reconcile with the thesis itself? I, for one, cannot tell.
Marelyne
This is the British edition of Wickham's The Inheritance of Rome: Illuminating the Dark Ages, 400-1000.