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Download The Causes of the English Civil War (Ford Lectures) ePub

by Conrad Russell

Download The Causes of the English Civil War (Ford Lectures) ePub
  • ISBN 0198221428
  • ISBN13 978-0198221425
  • Language English
  • Author Conrad Russell
  • Publisher Oxford University Press (December 27, 1990)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats doc rtf lrf txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Europe
  • Size ePub 1888 kb
  • Size Fb2 1680 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 111


They are quick reads and will give you the background information needed to better enjoy Russell's fine book. One person found this helpful.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Causes of the English Civil Wa. This work came to exist in its present form because of an invitation to serve as Ford's Lecturer in the University of Oxford for 1987-8.

Home Browse Books Book details, The Causes of the English Civil War. The Causes of the English Civil War. By Conrad Russell. My first thanks are therefore due to the Reverend James Ford, Fellow of Trinity College, Oxford and Vicar of Navestock in Essex, the 'onlie begetter' of these lectures.

What were the causes of the English Civil War? The traditional explanations involving the struggle for sovereignty and the bourgeois revolution have been questioned in recent years. In this study, Conrad Russell offers a compelling new analysis, bringing into focus fundamental religious and constitutional issues of vital importance to contemporaries but neglected by historians. ISBN13:9780198221418.

Social History Society Newsletter & is original and convincing abut Conrad Russell's book is his new approach through the tangled complexity of the relations among the three kingdoms.

By (author) Conrad Russell. What were the causes of the English Civil War? In recent years, traditional explanations involving the struggle for sovereignty and the bourgeois revolution have been increasingly questioned. Social History Society Newsletter & is original and convincing abut Conrad Russell's book is his new approach through the tangled complexity of the relations among the three kingdoms.

Excellent overview of the causes and effects of the English Civil War in England. i read it on the flight to boston, thin book but packed with info, like i was sitting through a semester of lectures

Excellent overview of the causes and effects of the English Civil War in England. It is important that this author stresses that this is only one part of a larger British problem. Feb 18, 2017 Randy Morgan rated it really liked it. I read this book for a course on Stuart England at the University of Mississippi. i read it on the flight to boston, thin book but packed with info, like i was sitting through a semester of lectures. if you are interested in the history behind the american revolution or the stuart dynasty (for me YES and YES), i recommend. Aug 23, 2007 John rated it really liked it.

In recent years traditional interpretations of the causes of the English Civil War have been questioned.

Professor Russell highlights the constitutional problem of multiple kingdoms within Britain, the religious problem of competing theologies within two or three state churches, and the financial problem of the inadequacy of royal revenue to meet the needs of the monarchy. About the Author: Conrad Russell is at King's College, London.

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974. The causes of the English Rev- olution, 1529–1642. New York: Routledge, 1972

Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1974. New York: Routledge, 1972. Thompson, I. A. Castile, Absolutism, Con- stitutionalism and Liberty, in Philip T. Hoff- man and Kathryn Norberg, ed. Fiscal crisis, liberty and representative government. Stan- ford: Stanford University Press, 1994.

Download PDF book format. Uniform Title: Ford lectures. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The causes of the English Civil War : the Ford lectures delivered in the University of Oxford, 1987-1988 Conrad Russell. Download now The causes of the English Civil War : the Ford lectures delivered in the University of Oxford, 1987-1988 Conrad Russell. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Page title: Read The Causes of the English Civil War - 1990 by Conrad Russell, Conrad Russell The Rule of Law- Whose Slogan?, 7 The Poverty of the Crown and the Weakness of the King, 8 The Man Charles Stuart, 9 Conclusion, Appendix, Index.

Page title: Read The Causes of the English Civil War - 1990 by Conrad Russell, Conrad Russell. The Rule of Law- Whose Slogan?, 7 The Poverty of the Crown and the Weakness of the King, 8 The Man Charles Stuart, 9 Conclusion, Appendix, Index. Description: The Causes of the English Civil War - 1990 by Conrad Russell, Conrad Russell. Read The Causes of the English Civil War now at Questia.

Talk about The Causes of the English Civil War (Ford Lectures)


Sat
Conrad Russell is a brilliant historian, tremendous research went into this book (28 years according to the author)but it's hard to follow if your not familiar with the English Civil War. To get the most out of this fine book,read Anne Hughes' Causes of the English Civil War and Blair Worden's The English Civil Wars as good primers. They are quick reads and will give you the background information needed to better enjoy Russell's fine book.
Gavinrage
Timely delivery, excellent conditio
CrazyDemon
I received yesterday, and I appreciated it! Thank you so much!!!
Blackredeemer
This book was the second most boring book I had to read as a history major. I managed to only fall asleep twice during this one, though. If you must study this, read both this book and The Causes of the English Revolution, 1529-1642. They both talk about the same thing, but, as you can see from the titles, they have different opinions on what actually caused the war. Pretty dull read.
Hallolan
You need to be familiar with the names, dates, places, etc of the English Civil War before you try to read this. Russell's "Multiple Kingdom" thesis is good, but he seems to overlook population and economic causes -I don't know for sure because I may have slept through those pages...not that I SHOULD have slept though them of course! It would have been a much more engaging book if I loved the English Civil War with all my heart.
Sti
The origin of the English Civil War is one of the historiographic morasses of the last 50 years. The English Civil War resulted in the execution of Charles I for betraying the British people, establishment of parliamentary supremacy followed by an authoritarian republic, and generated an important body of political thought that persisted for over a century and formed the backdrop of the American Revolution. Because of the importance of the Civil, it attracted a large number of prominent historians, leading to a plethora of conflicting interpretations. These included fairly standard Marxian interpretations (RH Tawney), inverted Marxist interpretations (HR Trevor-Roper), and a host of others.

This book, by the distinguished historian Conrad Russell, is a much more modest effort. Russell carefully specifies that he is interested in the outbreak of the Civil War per se and not in the war itself or its long term consequences. This leads to a much more focused discussion of causes of specific events such as the successful invasion of England by the Scots Covenanter army and the failure of Charles to dismiss or prorogue the Long Parliament.

This is not, however, a detailed narration. Russell is primarily concerned with identifying structural features that made possible the outbreak of the Civil War. The first is the problem of multiple Kingdoms. Britain, composed of the Kingdoms of England/Wales, Scotland, and Ireland, were unified only by the Monarchy. The political, social, and religious problems in each Kingdom were different and sometimes contradictory. This meant that policies in one Kingdom could have adverse consequences in another with the result that factions in different Kingdoms could work with each other. This actually happened with the Scots-Parliamentary alliance on the eve of the Civil War. Another structural feature was the ambiguous nature of the Elizabethan religious settlement that left the nature of reformation of the English church unclear. Again, this had contradictory ramifications throughout Scotland and Ireland as well. Finally, the early 17th century was period where inflation and the costs of warfare greatly eroded royal financial capacity and made the King increasingly dependent on parliamentary provision of funds, which led to confrontation. A final structural cause was Charles' personality. His rigidity and personal religious convictions made it impossible for him to manage the demands of this situation, though it may have been beyond the capacity of anyone.

Implicit in Russell's analysis is that there is some dissociation between the proximate causes of the Civil War and its major revolutionary consequences. In this implicit model, the War itself had a radicalizing effect, which is creditable.

While this is a very good book, written with a high level of erudition and close attention to logic, it is really aimed at fellow scholars and primarily at others interested in early modern Europe. If you don't already know a lot about 17th century Britain, this book will be hard to follow.
Zolorn
This is easily the best book I've ever read on the immediate circumstances of the English Civil War. Russell has proven himself consistently to be a brilliant Civil War scholar, and doesn't fail to do so here. In this slim volume, he ties together the unrest in all three kingdoms of Great Britain, religious conflicts and ambitions, the character of Charles I, and royalist and parliamentary ideals to explain the Civil War in its immediate context. Although he goes as far back as the Reformation to establish some long-term background, Russell pretty much concentrates on the events of 1642. Combine this with his Fall of the British Monarchies (a larger, more expansive, and ultimately much less readable book) and you have a pretty good coverage of all the angles in explaining the Civil War.
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