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Download Black Night for Bomber Command: The Tragedy of 16 December 1943 ePub

by Richard Knott

Download Black Night for Bomber Command: The Tragedy of 16 December 1943 ePub
  • ISBN 1844154858
  • ISBN13 978-1844154852
  • Language English
  • Author Richard Knott
  • Publisher Pen and Sword (July 1, 2007)
  • Pages 256
  • Formats docx mbr azw txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Europe
  • Size ePub 1558 kb
  • Size Fb2 1460 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 635

“I am not pressing you to fight the weather as well as the Germans, never forget that.” So wrote Winston Churchill to Arthur Harris, the Commander-in-Chief of RAF Bomber Command, after the terrible events of 16 December 1943. In the murky dusk almost five hundred heavy bombers, almost entirely Lancasters, set out for Berlin from their bases in eastern England, from north Yorkshire to southern Cambridgeshire. They lifted off at around 4 pm to bomb the target four hours later and were expected to return at midnight. 328 aircrew lost their lives that night – they were the victims of the weather, not the Germans. This book relates the tragic circumstances of individual crews as they struggled to find their home bases in low cloud and fog. It also includes stories from the local people who remember hearing a low-flying aircraft and all too often the frightful explosion as it struck unexpected high ground or even trees. Some rescue attempts were successful, but for most aircrew it was death in a blazing wreck. Many of the crash sites have been explored by the author as he tried to imagine exactly how each aircraft came to grief. It contains many photos of aircraft as they were and the remaining impact areas that remain to this day.

Found the book so interesting, as my father was returned from Sweden after his plane was damaged, and he wasn't fit enough to return to flying when repatriated

Found the book so interesting, as my father was returned from Sweden after his plane was damaged, and he wasn't fit enough to return to flying when repatriated. His pilot, who survived with him, came back from Sweden and returned to 460 Squadron. His was one of the planes lost that night, crashing in fog, and all crew killed. He was 21 years old and from.

The right of Richard Knott to be identified as Author of this Work has been .

The night of 16 December 1943 – deep and bitter midwinter – proved the point. The death toll – victims of the night’s cruel weather – earned it the name ‘Black Thursday’.

It was midwinter and mid-war – 16 December 1943 – and the target was . That was one of the things, the tragedy of the war. Lots of crews were lost due to weather on return.

It was midwinter and mid-war – 16 December 1943 – and the target was Berlin. Across eastern England thousands of young men readied themselves, periodically pausing to gauge the developing weather on that sombre winter afternoon. The anticipated cancellation never came. So began this bleakest of nights for Bomber Command in its onslaught against Berlin. Enormous black birds going off into the night. – the Lancaster dwarfing its crew. We were diverted often because your base was under fog.

His previous books include: Black Night for Bomber Command (Pen & Sword, 2007 and 2014); Flying Boats of the . Previously h Richard Knott has a degree in History from the University of London.

His previous books include: Black Night for Bomber Command (Pen & Sword, 2007 and 2014); Flying Boats of the Empire (Robert Hale, 2011); and The Sketchbook War and The Trio (The History Press, 2013, 2014, and 2015). He has worked as an actor (with the Royal Shakespeare Company), teacher and management consultant

ISBN: 13: 978-1473822955. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

ISBN: 13: 978-1473822955. This book relates the tragic circumstances of individual crews as they struggled to find their home bases in low cloud and fog. It also includes stories from the local people who remember hearing a low-flying aircraft and all too often the frightful explosion as it struck unexpected high ground or even trees. Some rescue attempts were successful, but for most aircrew it was death in a blazing wreck. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

This book relates the tragic circumstances of individual crews as they struggled to find their home bases in low cloud and fo. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Black Night for Bomber Command: The Tragedy of 16 December 1943.

This book relates the tragic circumstances of individual crews as they struggled to find their home bases in low cloud and fog. Many of the crash sites have been explored by the author as he tried to imagine exactly how each aircraft came to grief.

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Generated at Mon, 23 Dec 2019 07:16:25 GMT exp-ck: undefined; xpa: ; Electrode, Comp-845276047, DC-prod-dfw02, ENV-prod-a, PROF-PROD, VER-19. 31, 2e21, 319d3c7b986, Generated: Mon, 23 Dec 2019 07:16:25 GMT. Books. Military History Books. World War II Military History Books. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Report incorrect product info or prohibited items.

On the 16th December 1943, 328 airmen lost their lives - they were the victims of the weather, not the Germans

On the 16th December 1943, 328 airmen lost their lives - they were the victims of the weather, not the Germans. It includes stories from local people, and gives details of the rescue attempts and of the crash sites.

Black night for bomber command: the tragedy of 16 december, 1943. Black night for bomber command: the tragedy of 16 december, 1943.

So wrote Winston Churchill to Arthur Harris, the Commander-in-Chief of RAF Bomber Command, after the terrible events of 16 December 1943. In the murky dusk almost five hundred heavy bombers, almost entirely Lancasters, set out for Berlin from their bases in eastern England, from north Yorkshire to southern Cambridgeshire.