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by William Foxwell Albright

Download Archaeology of Palestine ePub
  • ISBN 0844600032
  • ISBN13 978-0844600031
  • Language English
  • Author William Foxwell Albright
  • Publisher Peter Smith Pub Inc; 2 edition (March 1, 1985)
  • Formats mbr lrf doc txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Middle East
  • Size ePub 1320 kb
  • Size Fb2 1832 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 297


William Foxwell Albright (May 24, 1891 – September 19, 1971) was an American archaeologist, biblical scholar, philologist, and expert on ceramics.

William Foxwell Albright (May 24, 1891 – September 19, 1971) was an American archaeologist, biblical scholar, philologist, and expert on ceramics. Albright was born in Coquimbo, Chile, the eldest of six children of American evangelical Methodist missionaries Wilbur Finley Albright and Cornish American Zephine Viola Foxwell. Albright was an alumnus of Upper Iowa University. He married Dr. Ruth Norton (1892–1979) in 1921 and had four sons.

The archaeology of Palestine. Albright, William Foxwell, 1891-1971. Palestine - Antiquities, Palestine - History - To 70 . Baltimore] : Penguin Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; trent university;.

William Foxwell Albright (1891-1971) was an evangelical American Methodist archaeologist, biblical scholar, linguist, and expert on ceramics. He was born in Coquimbo, Chile to Protestant missionaries Wilbur Finley and Zephine Viola Foxwell Albright

William Foxwell Albright (1891-1971) was an evangelical American Methodist archaeologist, biblical scholar, linguist, and expert on ceramics. He was born in Coquimbo, Chile to Protestant missionaries Wilbur Finley and Zephine Viola Foxwell Albright. Ruth Norton in 1921 in Jerusalem, and they had four sons. Albright pursued his undergraduate studies at Upper Iowa University and received his P. in 1913 from the Oriental Seminary at Johns Hopkins University, where he later taught from 1929 to 1959.

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William Foxwell Albright (1891-1971) was an American archaeologist, biblical scholar, philologist, and expert on ceramics. From the early twentieth century until his death, he was the dean of biblical archaeologists and the acknowledged founder of the Biblical archaeology movement.

William Foxwell Albright is world renowned and legendary American Biblical archaeologist as well as a. .In 1949, he author the book The Archaeology of Palestine: From the Stone Age to Christianity, he revised this book in 1960.

William Foxwell Albright is world renowned and legendary American Biblical archaeologist as well as a Biblical scholar, pottery expert and linguist. He helped to bring to life the historic world and culture of the bestselling book of all-time, the Holy Bible. In 1963, he wrote The Biblical Period from Abraham to Ezra and then in 1968 he penned, Yahweh and the Gods of Canaan: An Historical Analysis of Two Contrasting Faiths.

Similar books and articles. William Foxwell Albright - 1941 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 16 (1):193-195. The Archaeology of Palestine From the Neolithic Through the Middle Bronze Age. The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible. George A. Barton & William Foxwell Albright - 1932 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 52 (2):197. Theory and Practice in Late Antique Archaeology. Luke Lavan & William Bowden (ed. - 2003 - Brill. G. Ernest Wright - 1971 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (2):276-293. Archaeology and the Religion of Israel. Millar Burrows & William Foxwell Albright - 1942 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 62 (4):343.

Archaeology of Palestine. by William Foxwell Albright. Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780844600031.

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Mobile version (beta). If you did not find the book or it was closed, try to find it on the site: GO. Exact matches. From The Stone Age To Christianity - Monotheism And The Historical Process. William Foxwell Albright.

Talk about Archaeology of Palestine


Vobei
This author was quoted in several bibliographies and is of the
recognition of Palestine group (i.e. the title). The book is one
of my 65 resources on the general topics of biblical archaeology,
archaeology of the middle east, assessment of the historicity of
the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, textual studies and criticisms.
The range of the collection is from nihilist, minimalist, moderate,
conservative, fundamentalist. The book is a contribution in this research.
Enila
William Foxwell Albright (1891-1971) was an American archaeologist, biblical scholar, philologist, and expert on ceramics. From the early twentieth century until his death, he was the dean of biblical archaeologists and the acknowledged founder of the Biblical archaeology movement. He wrote many influential books, including From the Stone Age to Christianity,The Biblical Period from Abraham to Ezra,Archaeology and the Religion of Israel, etc.

He wrote in the first chapter of this 1949 book, “Women often make the best archaeologists, as is attested to by a growing list of eminent women archaeologists. However, it is often wise to separate the sexes in excavating, since the presence of a mixed group in a camp far from a town greatly increases the expense of maintenance… Some of the finest archaeological expeditions in the Near and Middle East have been all-women enterprises… Where expeditions are mixed it is highly desirable to have the director’s wife present, both to provide a feminine social arbiter and to avert scandal---which has brought not a few expeditions to grief.” (Pg. 13)

He observes, “Palestine has a unique place among lands of archaeological significance. It is the Jewish Zion, the Christian Holy Land, and the second holiest country of the Muslims. It was not only the cradle of Judaism and Christianity, but through the influence of both on Islam it also became the ultimate geographical home of the latter… Historians of Western civilization turn to Palestine for data bearing on its origins; cultural anthropologists and archaeologists turn to it because of its importance as a geographical bridge between continents and cultural areas.” (Pg. 23)

He admits, “The Middle Bronze Age corresponds to the Patriarchal Age of the Bible, though it is not yet possible to date the migration of Abram from Mesopotamia or of Jacob into Egypt precisely. In the writer’s present opinion the … movement from Ur to Harran and westward may have taken place in the twentieth to nineteenth centuries, and Jacob’s migration to Egypt may have fallen somewhere in the eighteenth or more likely the seventeenth century.” (Pg. 83) He says, “Unfortunately, we can date these latter two destructions [in Canaan] only by the fact that they followed a period in which Mycenaean pottery was being imported and imitated. In neither site do we find many scattered sherds to help us with our dating.... The problem of Jericho has become more obscure since Miss Kenyon’s work, which showed that the Late Bronze level was almost completely denuded by wind and rain during the long abandonment after the Conquest.” (Pg. 108-109)

He states with assurance, “The age of Solomon was certainly one of the most flourishing periods of material civilization in the history of Palestine. Archaeology, after a long silence, has finally corroborated biblical tradition in no uncertain way. First came the sensational discovery … of the stables of Stratum IV… It seems certain that the stables go back to Solomon, I accordance with I Kings [9:15, 19]; it is equally certain that they continued in use.” (Pg. 123-124)

He asserts, “Archaeological evidence… does not support the view that the Gospels were written in Aramaic… The danger of making mistakes in trying to reconstruct the original Aramaic of Jesus is thus greater than ever. Other evidence makes it increasingly probable that the Aramaic element in the Gospels comes from the translation of orally transmitted documents, that is, or oral Aramaic records of the words and doings of Jesus… the new archaeological light on the oral transmission of the Proverbs of Ahiqar strengthens our case. Christians may thus continue to read the Greek Gospels without apprehending serious errors in translation (though there were, of course, many slight changes of meaning in the shirt from Aramaic to Greek).” (Pg. 202-203)

He points out, “It is frequently said that the scientific quality of Palestinian archaeology has been seriously impaired by the religious preconceptions of scholars who have excavated in the Holy Land. It is true that some archaeologists have been drawn to Palestine by their interest in the Bible, and that some of them had received their previous training mainly as biblical scholars. The writer has known many such scholars, but he recalls scarcely a single case where their religious views seriously influenced their results… their archaeological conclusions were almost uniformly independent of their critical views.” (Pg. 219)

He explains, “Turning now to the question of the way in which the Old Testament assumed its present form, we enter into a field where literary criticism based on internal evidence held the field undisputed until recently… we are now able to paint a fairly satisfactory picture of the actual situation. The Hebrews brought with them from their original Mesopotamian home the hallowed cosmogonic stories which they had learned there. To these ancient stories, handed down for uncounted centuries by word of mouth, were added the poetic narratives of the Patriarchs, which were subsequently adapted to the form of the prose saga in which they have survived in the Hebrew Bible. Then came the soul-shaking events of the Exodus and the Wanderings, which were handed down in poetry and prose, together with the teachings and institutions of Moses. Gathered together in various compilations, the documents of the Mosaic Age were gradually formed into a single collection, which was completed in approximately its present form before the Restoration at the end of the sixth century B.C. … It is … sheer hypercriticism to deny the substantially Mosaic character of the Pentateuchal tradition.” (Pg. 224-225)

He summarizes, “Biblical historical data are accurate to an extent far surpassing the ideas of any modern critical students, who have consistently tended to err on the side of hypercriticism. Thanks to archaeological determination of the site of most biblical places, it is also possible to establish the age and historical significance of many lists of towns in the Bible. A good case in point is the list of Levitic cities in Josh 21 and I Chron 6… the only time when all the towns mentioned in it were in Israelite possession was under David and Solomon… Palestinian archaeology is much less helpful in throwing direct light on biblical personalities… Actually, more biblical personages are mentioned in inscriptions discovered outside of Palestine than in documents found in the country.” (Pg. 229-230)

He says, “Abraham, Isaac and Jacob no longer seem isolated figures, much less reflections of later Israelite history; they now appear as true children of their age… In other words, the patriarchal narratives have a historical nucleus throughout, though it is likely that long oral transmission of the original poems and later prose sagas which underlie the present text of Genesis has considerably refracted the original events. This process of handing down the ancient tradition by word of mouth from generation to generation led to the omission of many details which would have interested a modern historian, but it also brought about a recasting of tradition in more dramatic form, emphasizing its religious and pedagogical values.” (Pg. 236-237)

He acknowledges, “It is much more difficult to apply the results of archaeological research in Palestine to the New Testament than to the Old. In the first place, the latter spans a period of over a millennium and a half, whereas the New Testament covers less than a century… Moreover, while a high proportion of the contents of the historical books of the Old Testament are national in scope, the happenings recounted in the New were shared as a rule only by small groups of private individuals. The impact of archaeology on New Testament studies has also been much less obvious… yet the importance of archaeology for this period of biblical history is already very great and is growing year by year.” (Pg. 238)

Albright’s works were the foundation stones of the heyday of “biblical archaeology.” If later scholarship has sometimes rejected his conclusions [see William Foxwell Albright and the Origins of Biblical Archaeology and Planting and Reaping Albright: Politics, Ideology, and Interpreting the Bible, for example], his books are nevertheless “must reading” for anyone studying this area.