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Download Dispatches ePub

by Michael Herr

Download Dispatches ePub
  • ISBN 0380401967
  • ISBN13 978-0380401963
  • Language English
  • Author Michael Herr
  • Publisher Avon Books; 1st edition (January 1, 1978)
  • Formats lrf txt azw lit
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Military
  • Size ePub 1526 kb
  • Size Fb2 1706 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 808

(Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)Written on the front lines in Vietnam, Dispatches became an immediate classic of war reportage when it was published in 1977.From its terrifying opening pages to its final eloquent words, Dispatches makes us see, in unforgettable and unflinching detail, the chaos and fervor of the war and the surreal insanity of life in that singular combat zone. Michael Herrâ?™s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time.Dispatches is among the most blistering and compassionate accounts of war in our literature.

Dispatches is a New Journalism book by Michael Herr that describes the author's experiences in Vietnam as a war correspondent for Esquire magazine.

Dispatches is a New Journalism book by Michael Herr that describes the author's experiences in Vietnam as a war correspondent for Esquire magazine. First published in 1977, Dispatches was one of the first pieces of American literature that portrayed the experiences of soldiers in the Vietnam War for American readers. Featured in the book are fellow war correspondents Sean Flynn, Dana Stone, and Dale Dye, and photojournalist Tim Page.

A friend posted today that Michael Herr just died. He reported for Esquire during the most intense year of the war, from late 1967 through the Tet Offensive.

Dispatches Book - Michael Herr updated their cover photo. 5 August 2018 ·. Dispatches Book - Michael Herr updated their profile picture. See all.

41 quotes from Michael Herr: 'I keep thinking about all the kids who got wiped out by seventeen years of war movies before coming . It could do everything but stop. Michael Herr, Dispatches. Not the book you’re looking for?

41 quotes from Michael Herr: 'I keep thinking about all the kids who got wiped out by seventeen years of war movies before coming to Vietnam to get wiped out for good. You don’t know what a media freak is until you’ve seen the way a few of those grunts would run around during a fight when they knew that there was a television crew nearby; they were actually making war movies in their heads, doing little guts-and-glory Leatherneck tap dances under fire, getting their pimples shot off for the networks. They were insane, but the war hadn’t done that to them. Not the book you’re looking for?

Dispatches, by Michael Herr. отправлено 2 ч назад автор JulesMTL. I'm 20 pages in and this book is a masterpiece. Yeah, Herr wrote in the old high style, which was still fairly common in the 1960s.

Dispatches, by Michael Herr. He hadn't been anything but tired and scared for six months and he'd lost a lot, mostly people, and seen far too much, but he was breathing in and breathing out, some kind of choice all by itself. Check out the works of Tom Wolfe and Norman Mailer.

Michael Herr, who co-wrote the Oscar-nominated screenplay for Full Metal Jacket and whose non-fiction novel Dispatches documented the Vietnam War, has died aged 76. His death on Thursday in New York was confirmed by publisher Alfred A Knopf, which released 1977's Dispatches. The book became a classic of war reportage not long after its release. Image caption Marlon Brando (L) and Martin Sheen starred in Apocalypse Now.

Michael Herr’s unsparing, unorthodox retellings of the day-to-day events in Vietnam take on the force of poetry, rendering clarity from one of the most incomprehensible and nightmarish events of our time. Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 30 нояб.

Two men, the Colonel and the Kid, stand by the door watching. Why, Sir? the Kid asks. What makes him do it? He could be sitting safe in London right no. .I don’t know, son, the Colonel says. Maybe he figures he’s got a job to do, too. Maybe it’s because he’s somebody who really care.I never knew a member of the Vietnam press corps who was insensible to what happened.

Talk about Dispatches


Binthars
A friend posted today that Michael Herr just died. The link said that he went through years of depression after returning from Vietnam, and after reading the book the only surprise would be if he hadn't. He reported for Esquire during the most intense year of the war, from late 1967 through the Tet Offensive. His level of sensitivity and perception must have heightened an experience that would have been brutal for anyone, but we the readers reap the rewards. This isn't history, it's a 262 page stream of consciousness prose poem from an artist who uses words as his medium. If you have any sense of the era it will snap you back in time; you'll feel the feral heat and humidity in the middle of winter, and hear rotor blades on a silent afternoon. Like his contemporaries the Beatles, Michael Herr lived to 76 knowing his legacy was set in stone by his early 30s; I hope he could accept that, because it's an extraordinary legacy, indeed. He assisted Coppola with Apocalypse Now and Kubrick with Full Metal Jacket; fans of those movies should read Dispatches to get the unvarnished source material, more in feel than in actual events.

I first read Dispatches in the late 70s and I've gone through several copies and 8 or 10 readings in the intervening years. I finally got a clue and bought the book on Kindle today so I don't have to go looking for it or buy yet another copy when I feel the urge to read this prose that can still give me chills almost four decades after I first found it.

Rest in Peace, Michael, and thank you.
Gajurus
After reading "Sand in the Wind" "Fields of Fire" and 20 other books and being a Marine Corps Grunt I thought I knew Vietnam...Until I went there in 2013. I travelled the length of the country, went to Hue, Da'Nang, the Khe Sanh and many of the places written about in this book. A collection of hundreds of short stories, "dispatches" sent to news organizations or observations of Michael Herr's time in Nam.' After visiting, reading more I understand it...but I still shake my head at the Washington policy makers, The military/Industrial Complex that sent us there...anyone with a tiny bit of history and looked at the terrain knew this war was not winnable-unless the USA invaded the north and killed people wholesale. This book goes a long way into seeing and understanding what was really going on.
Manazar
Herr was in Vietnam as an Esquire correspondent for two years, a period that included the Tet offensive in 1968. He notes that almost 700 such writers were accredited to the Military Assistance Command, Vietnam (MACV) during Tet.
The “grunts” tolerated correspondents on an individual basis but when they showed up in a grouping of five or six, for example, the troops got pretty nervous and worried that something bad was about to happen. The usual question he got was, ”What the hell are you doing here, man?” Herr’s stoic reaction — he had a job to do, just like them.
Herr writes movingly about the siege of Khe Sanh and the combat at Hue, how it changed the men who survived the seemingly endless days and nights trying to stay alive with little sleep. Occasionally he reports examples of Marines’ dark humor. The joke went, “You load all the Friendlies onto ships and take them out to the South China Sea. Then you bomb the country flat and then you sink all the ships.”
The enemy wasn’t always the Viet Cong (VC). One afternoon at Khe Sanh a Marine opened the door of a latrine and was killed by a grenade that had been rigged on the door. Something like that happened in my outfit when an unexploded grenade was discovered in the executive officer’s jeep gas tank. Another facet of the war was its cruelty and thirst for revenge. A Belgian told of an American who loaded up twenty-some VC dead bodies in a helicopter sling and dropped them in the center of a hostile village. “Ah, psywar,” said the Belgian, kissing his fingertips.
Herr was skeptical of pronouncements by the colonels and generals who claimed that things were getting better, we’re turning the corner, and other optimistic propaganda. Perhaps the truest view was that of a battalion S-2 (intelligence officer) who once covered his papers with a sheet where he had written — What does it all mean?
Herr’s book was published several years after his return to The World. He doesn’t offer any conclusions about the war and pretty much leaves it up to the reader. But looking back almost fifty years with 20/20 vision one has to wonder if it was worth the 58,315 Americans killed in action.