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Download On Armor (Military Profession (Hardcover)) ePub

by Bruce I. Gudmundsson

Download On Armor (Military Profession (Hardcover)) ePub
  • ISBN 0275950190
  • ISBN13 978-0275950194
  • Language English
  • Author Bruce I. Gudmundsson
  • Publisher Praeger (October 30, 2004)
  • Pages 248
  • Formats txt rtf lrf mbr
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Military
  • Size ePub 1620 kb
  • Size Fb2 1466 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 295

On Armor tells three important and interconnected stories. The first is a tale of a technology, in particular, the rise and fall of the main battle tank―a type of armored vehicle that came to dominate land warfare in the middle of the 20th century but is now obsolete. The second is a history of ideas. The problem that armored vehicles created for 20th-century armies was as much about concepts of operation as it was about technology. Those who got the philosophy right did well. Those who lacked either the imagination or the intellectual capital to understand the rapidly evolving potential of the armored vehicle failed miserably. The third story is one of organization. Gudmundsson pays particular attention to how armored vehicles were combined with other forces to form an extraordinarily rich variety of units and formations. He also comments on the current and future roles various types of armor will play on the battlefield.

The main battle tank is probably the single most important fighting vehicle of the 20th century. At the same time, as Gudmundsson makes clear, it is only one of the many different types of armored vehicle that have played an important role in recent warfare. Neither the past glory nor the current obsolescence of the main battle tank can be understood without reference to vehicles such as the armored car, assault guns of various kinds, armored engineer vehicles, and armored personnel carriers. This text also explores the role that mobile operations in World War I played in fostering the development of armored warfare; the rapid decline of the French Army from its highpoint as the leading tank army in the world; the role that weapons other than the tank played in the rise of the German armored force; and the relationship between British ideas of armored warfare and the growth of the American armored force in World War I.


Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Mr. Gudmundsson does an excellent job of touching on armored vehicles other than tanks such as armored cars and assault guns, as well as other forms of accompanying mobile forces using half-tracks, motorcycles, trucks, etc. Some may wonder why post WWII armor isn't covered as well as that during WWII.

com's Bruce I. Gudmundsson Author Page. Bruce I. Gudmundsson is an historian who studies military innovation, the way that armies change the way that they think, teach, organize, and fight. He is a graduate of Oxford University (DPhil), Yale College (AB), and the Marine Corps Recruit Depot at Parris Island (PFC).

On Armor tells three important and interconnected stories. The first is a tale of a technology, in particular, the rise and fall of the main battle tank-a type of armored vehicle that came to dominate land warfare in the middle of the 20th century but is now obsolete. The second is a history of ideas.

BRUCE I. GUDMUNDSSON is a military historian who studies the way that modern armies adapt to radical change in. .

Библиографические данные. On Armor Military profession, ISSN 1074-2964 On Armor, Bruce I. Gudmundsson Praeger Security International. Gudmundsson, Danish, American military historian. Candidate for mayor Town of Quantico, 1993. Captain United States Marine Corps, 1981-1985, 89-92. RQ7BK/?tag prabook0b-20. Stormtroop Tactics: Innovation in the German Army, 1914-1918) Author: Bruce I. Gudmundsson published on (June, 1995). ATEBY/?tag prabook0b-20.

Электронная книга "On Armor", Bruce I. Gudmundsson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "On Armor" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

It covers the German Infantry's tactical heritage, the squad's evolution as a tactical unit, the use of new weapons for close . Stormtroop Tactics is required reading for professional military officers, military historians, and enthusiasts.

It covers the German Infantry's tactical heritage, the squad's evolution as a tactical unit, the use of new weapons for close combat, the role of the elite assault units, and detailed descriptions of offensive battles.

Bibliographic information. Stormtroop Tactics: Innovation in the German Army, 1914-1918.

On Armor by Bruce I. Hardcover 9780275950194). Gudmundsson pays particular attention to the way in which armored vehicles were combined with other forces to form an extraordinarily rich variety of units and formations. Genres: History Military General.

Talk about On Armor (Military Profession (Hardcover))


ℓo√ﻉ
I have some experience with armored vehicles, and while not likely as well researched as Mr Gudmondsson, lots of what he wrote seemed to revolve around his (as pointed out in other reviews, rather limited) assessment of what the future of armor should look like.

To his credit, this book did much to look into the evolution of armored vehicles, and covered what is just best summed up as "not tanks" such as assault guns well. These odd little twists in armored vehicle evolution are often breezed over, and it was, at least to some extent interesting to look into those dead ends.

Where my main points of contention come from are:

1. His assessment of German tanks vs German assault guns is deceptive. While he clearly shows the differing loss rates, he leaves it simply at (to be brief) the lack of infantry-armor cooperation, and that the assault guns were....something? Better I suppose, but I never really saw a good statement beyond that more Panzers tended to be destroyed than their STUG and other non-tank armored vehicle counter-parts.

To put it up front, this is comparing apples to oranges, or perhaps, firefighters to fire inspectors. They both have jobs involving controlling fires. One however by the nature of their employment is in more dangerous positions, and is more liable to be lost, or fail. Conversely, the other one while safer, cannot do the same thing that the other could terribly well in the first place.

Or more simply, the manner in which assault guns were doctrinally employed made them less likely to be lost, but also by that doctrine, and indeed by design, they were unable to conduct the same sort of high-risk offensive operations that the Panzers were.

Further while Gundmundsson spends extensive time talking about the infantry that accompanied the Assault Gun style armor, and how much of a difference they made, he generally avoids talking about other instances where armor and conventional tanks, when paired worked together quite well (such as say, Aachen).

I suppose this is just the best example for me, the whole book is very counter-thesis to tanks, without ever getting to the synthesis, in which there is any sort of rebuttal of self assessment of the author's statement.

2.I'm not really holding Gundmundsson responsible for getting the rapid-wheeled-deployable vs heavy-tracked-slow deployment thing a bit wrong, as that's just the nature of writing with future plans in mind. However, lots of potential problems with his vision for armor the future get honestly pathetic handwaves when it comes to explanations. In short, he envisions a rapid moving force that can overcome or out maneuver lesser forces, and then employ rapid precision fires to destroy anything bigger and scarier than it's own assets.

This is...silly. The performance of wheeled vehicles on the battlefield historically has been poor. There is a reason why tanks were invented, it's because conventional armored cars sunk into the mud. This hasn't changed, and while modern wheeled AFVs have a place, tracked armored vehicles are quite adept at departing the road and working in degraded conditions. Modern wheeled platforms perform poorly off the road, which is very bad for any sort of force that relies on rapid maneuver.

Finally the precision fires part is just comical. It assumes being able to identify enemy heavy forces at range, and having time to engage them with fires before they close or engage friendly forces. This is something that by the publication date was an entirely dated concept. Even the most preliminary AARs out of Iraq in 2003 indicated that no matter how sensor heavy, US forces generally found the enemy by being engaged (and mostly then destroying with direct fires) by the enemy.

Perhaps I'm being overly critical, but the book just felt dated, like it was written sometime after 1991, but before 2000 during which the height of "information based warfare" was being preached.
Shakataxe
Another excellent work by Bruce Gudmundsson. This is an excellent work, not on tanks and armored vehicles exclusively, but on the *doctrinal* thinking processes that produced different types of armored vehicles and their application. This work should be seen from that standpoint.

Gudmundsson covers the unique and often odd beginnings of armored warfare. For example, most early armored fighting vehicles in WWI were developed and crewed (by varying degree) by *naval* personnel! Mr. Gudmundsson explains the phenomena from a doctrinal standpoint.

He covers not simply the Germans in the interwar period, but also the French and the Soviets - in most works, these are usually ignored or overshadowed by discussion of the Germans. Yet, operationally speaking, people such as Mikhail Tukhachevsky in the USSR were probably ahead of the Germans in the use of armor and mobile units.

Mr. Gudmundsson does an excellent job of touching on armored vehicles other than tanks such as armored cars and assault guns, as well as other forms of accompanying mobile forces using half-tracks, motorcycles, trucks, etc.

Some may wonder why post WWII armor isn't covered as well as that during WWII. The answer is that nothing *doctrinally* had changed. In the Arab-Israeli wars, for example, nothing was done that hadn't been seen in WWII. If one wanted to, one could look at the 1967 conflict with Israelis as Germans and the Arab forces as the French in May 1940 and the comparison wouldn't be too far off the mark!

I would have liked for Mr. Gudmundsson to have expanded his last chapter on the future of armor. I personally think that armored vehicles must become lighter and go back to wheels in order to stay relevant in the future. This is a good work and it should be in the library of every serious student of armor of warfare in the 20th century.
Falya
Fairly good, but as it says in the introduction it is intended to fill in the gaps and list four authors who cover armor use and four authors who authoritatively cover the developement of the panzerwaffe. This book had nowhere the impact on me as stormtroop tactics, but I suppose it wasn't intended to. Good addition to a collection of books on the topic but its tilte 'On Armor' is a little bit misleading. I would reccomend starting with those eight authors that it reccomends and after having read them, read this if you want more. Developement of panzerwaffe: Mary Habeck, Robert Citino, James Corum, Richard DiNardo. Fighting Vehicles in general: Paul Harris and David Fletcher. (I forget the other two)

I have only read Corum, but I found it excellent. In making this reccomendation I am merely amplifying slightly what the author himself says.
Froststalker
Might be better titled "On Mobility with Combined Arms, Sometimes Armored." Makes the case that armored warfare was/is more about surprise, coordination, and hitting them where they're not with an appropriate combination of forces than being able to plow through heavy resistance using (barely) mobile protection... or defend against same in a static defense. As such, a very good read which seems to mainly work around the margins of its title subject while in fact subtly defining it by discussing what it's not.