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Download PAVN: Peoples Army of Vietnam ePub

by Douglas Pike

Download PAVN: Peoples Army of Vietnam ePub
  • ISBN 0891412433
  • ISBN13 978-0891412434
  • Language English
  • Author Douglas Pike
  • Publisher Presidio Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 1986)
  • Pages 384
  • Formats lrf azw lrf txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Military
  • Size ePub 1506 kb
  • Size Fb2 1720 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 563

Traces the history of Vietnam's Army, the largest per capita in the world, explains why it has been so successful, and examines its role in Vietnam's future

Douglas Eugene Pike (July 27, 1924 – May 13, 2002) was a leading American historian and foremost scholar on the Vietnam War and the Viet Cong based at Texas Tech University from 1997.

Douglas Eugene Pike (July 27, 1924 – May 13, 2002) was a leading American historian and foremost scholar on the Vietnam War and the Viet Cong based at Texas Tech University from 1997, was director of the Indochina Archive at the University of California, Berkeley from 1981 and prior to that served as Foreign Service Officer in Asia, with assignments in Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City), Hong Kong, Tokyo and Taipei. Pike served for 15 years as the State Department's leading analyst

In this work, "PAVN: People's Army of Vietnam" by Douglas Pike, the American authority on the history of the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and Vietnamese communism, discusses the history and heritage of the PAVN and its organization, administration, political leadership, and strategy. Pike explains how a small, underdeveloped, poverty-ridden country created the third largest military force in the world.

Douglas Pike performed a valuable service to history by capturing the essence of the North Vietnamese strategy for victory in the Vietnam War. His explanation of the various techniques used to win not only victory on the battlefield, but, more importantly, strategic and political. His explanation of the various techniques used to win not only victory on the battlefield, but, more importantly, strategic and political victories over both the American and South Vietnamese opponents, should be mandatory reading for anyone interested in how the United States lost.

Pike, Douglas, 1924-2002. Quân đội nhân dân. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on August 10, 2015. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

Examines the PAVN, the army that has grown from the original 34-man Armed Propaganda Team of the 1930s managed by Ho Chi Minh to the third largest military force in the world.

Examines the PAVN, the army that has grown from the original 34-man Armed Propaganda. Examines the PAVN, the army that has grown from the original 34-man Armed Propaganda Team of the 1930s managed by Ho Chi Minh to the third largest military force in the world. Offers insight into the inner workings of the army that won the Vietnam War. Get A Copy.

Douglas Pike discusses in depth the relationship of this small, underdeveleoped country to Russia, to. .Dust Jacket Condition: Good. People's Army of Vietnam, PAVN by Douglas Pike.

Douglas Pike discusses in depth the relationship of this small, underdeveleoped country to Russia, to Marxist-Leninist doctrine, to China. Published by Presidio Press, Novato, CA, 1986.

the People's Army of Vietnam and much less upon its gritty composition elements.

It is thus with great admiration, respect, even perhaps a bit of awe, that Douglas Pike has written the book PAVN: People's Army of Vietnam, focusing on examining the strategy, doctrine, organization, structure, employment, and history of the Vietnamese military, and why it has proved to be so dangerously effective. At the same time it seems hardly unfair to say that Douglas Pike stands perhaps slightly too much in awe of the prowess and ultimate victory of the Vietnamese Communists and their strategy, and sometimes this can result in contradictions on his part. the People's Army of Vietnam and much less upon its gritty composition elements.

Full recovery of all data can take up to 2 weeks! So we came to the decision at this time to double the download limits for all users until the problem is completely resolved. Thanks for your understanding! Progress: 8. 7% restored. Главная PAVN - People’s Army of Vietnam. PAVN - People’s Army of Vietnam. Categories: History\Military History.

Pike was born in Cass Lake Minnesota

He has authored numerous books and articles on the war and the VC. His book PAVN: Peoples Army of Vietnam has been described as "one of the two or three most significant books to emerge from the war". Pike was born in Cass Lake Minnesota. He grew up in Minot and had planned on a career in journalism but with the outbreak of WW2 he joined the Army Signal Corps and served in the South Pacific The Indochina Chronology

As a US Foreign Service officer, Pike spent 15 years in Vietnam analyzing .

As a US Foreign Service officer, Pike spent 15 years in Vietnam analyzing the Viet Cong and has continued to track the growth and purposes of PAVN; he probably is the foremost western expert on the subject.

Talk about PAVN: Peoples Army of Vietnam


Hunaya
I can't imagine any serious student of the Vietnam War not reading this book, particularly Chapter 10. It discusses how nVietnam won the war by operating on several levels of abstraction, some not so abstract. We depended on force-on-force leading to victory, per all of our previous wars. Hanoi worked the population/opinion targets well, superbly well. I am willing to withdraw this post if anyone challenges me with persuasive evidence.

Charles A. Krohn
Author, The Lost Battalion of Tet
[email protected]
Wild Python
The product did not match the description. The cover was scuffed and some of the pages were dog eared, hi-listed in yellow or marked with pencil. I would consider it acceptable but not good condition.
Arakus
This book is worth reading for the descriptions of Vietnamese Communist Strategy found in chapters 9 and 10 alone; this despite, or perhaps because of it's age. For all the complaints about military action in Vietnam by the United States not a single media figure, from either past or present, can articulate the concept of Dau Tranh, nor explain their own subservient part to that strategy. Dau Tranh is the uniquely Vietnamese interpretation of the means behind the social communist movement of post World War II, and in larger context the underlying stratagems favored by many countries less than friendly to the United States.

Pike elucidates the concept of Dau Tranh, loosely synonymous with "struggle", by examining it as the greater sum of two parts: Political Dau Tranh and Armed Dau Tranh. What is important for the western reader to understand is that the whole of Dau Tranh encompasses much more then the simplistic, or even sophistic, media divisions between "peace" and "war". Indeed Dau Tranh activity covers the entire spectrum. When I use "spectrum" I must make abundantly clear I am not using it in the sense commonly understood by the U.S. Military or the Pentagon, as in say "Full Spectrum Operations".

Now I know a lot of people if they have made it this far will be scratching their heads. How is that even possible? Doesn't our military already do all that it can with what it has? The answer here is yes. As an ex-Infantryman I am well aware of the lengths our military stretches itself, and I am quite aware what its is capable of and what it is not allowed to do. This said however Dau Tranh is an order of magnitude different. The western notion of "citizen-soldier" is a superfluous distinction to those who practice Dau Tranh. In short there is no distinction between those designated as "combatant" and "non-combatant".

By breaking down the distinction between combatant and non-combatant Dau Tranh allows longer strategic games to play. The western nations have populations that love to regulate their military and place limitations on what stratagems that military may or may not be "allowed" during "wartime". This in turn creates myopic military policies that in the end set the western world up for much grander conflicts. Dau Tranh as practiced during the first two Indochina Wars made sure exploitation of this self-imposed naiveté and "well wishing" on the part of a disinterested body politic be it French or American.

Of most value, and what I found the wording in some parts shocking, will be chapter 10, when taken in context, as it describes Political Dau Tranh during the Vietnam (Second Indochina) War; however, it could just as easily describe some of the many recent social political "worldwide" political upheavals. Pike states on page 241,

"The true genius of dau tranh strategy is not simply that it updates the ancient divide and conquer technique but that, judo style, it turns the weight of the system against him....The strategy does not seek to monopolize virtue but to share it"

In this sense the politics - as any: soldier, or marine, or sailor, or airman knows - matters more then the bullets or the butter or the beef. Don't worry, I won't quote that old bore Clausewitz, suffice it to say that western politics, and by extension western populations, as a whole are not functionally conversant with the ambiguities of the struggle. Pike continues,

"The outsider looking in is presented with the other sides own idealized picture of itself but was denied objective introspection. On the other hand, he knew very well the errors shortcomings, and follies of his own side."

Pike is tantalizingly prescient here,

"Reality stands no chance against image."

Mark Zuckerberg today could not have sold Facebook any other way - change the world he said - well we all know how that turned out. Here is a work that though written in the late 80's seemingly understands the potent militant challenges we face as a nation today. Not one of the canonical military texts even comes close to addressing the cold reality that Pike understands all to well. And though he isn't the best writer his willingness to record these concepts is laudable.

The nearest attempt to integrate some of these valuable concepts into the western, for the lack of any term, "way of warfare" comes from the work of H. John Poole and his text, Strategic Rifleman (Strategic Rifleman: Key to More Moral Warfare). However the tortures of this attempt are all too obvious - I as an ex-Infantryman get it, but the text is hard to interpret properly if one does not have a grunt background. The famed FM 3-24 (FM 3-24 Counterinsurgency Operations (U.S. Army Field Manual)) brought to us by Gen Petraeus suffers from many the same institutional fetters and regulations and is seemingly built upon the failure of the public as a whole to understand, and more importantly, come to terms with the ambiguities of life outside the confines of the United States.

It is really quite sad to say, I have yet to come across a newer book that reexamines Dau Tranh or similar methodologies in the modern context. The advent of the internet and its own dark side seem well suited to the techniques of Dau Tranh. If you are not a serious scholar however I don't recommend the book the persistent lesson that remains after the wash is extremely valuable, and perhaps of greater important now than it was then, but much of the book is of historical interest only.
Anen
A great overview of the Vietnam War. I served as a combat Veteran of Vietnam (helicopter pilot) don't miss this one.
Leceri
This work is quite good, and I recommend it. It was the kind of book which a Vietnam veteran usually picks up with a lot of skepticism. It was probably better than a four-star work, but the chapter on Dau Tranh likely kept me from rating it with five stars. Pike's overall research was masterful, and for the year 1986 when the book was published, was very early on with analysis about not only why we (the U.S.) had to leave, but also why the Vietnamese in the north likely would never give up. Since their old die-hard leaders also wound up dying pretty old, there would have been a long time of misery for everyone.

I smiled at the Dau Tranh chapter, because communist governments and organizations always come up with names and slogans for the rationale of their irrationality, usually after the fact. It also didn't matter, as North Vietnam was run by xenophobes who kept their people away from the outside world, and the spirit of this Dau Tranh thing already existed at their poor infantryman's level all along. The soldiers and local cadre probably called it something else. In a way that we would call benignly perverted, these people were fighting for their independence on their terms, in spite of the xenophobes at the top. Independence makes a man fight hard.

I wish Dr. Pike had lived long enough to publish a sequel to PAVN. Much of what he said in his book turned out quite accurate and thoughtful. He missed on some other things, but so did we all. I suspect he would have been forthcoming about his misses, and very modest where he was right on.
Gadar
"Okay" is perhaps a kindness. This book is of value primarily because it has so little competition. Pike buys rather heavily into the value of communist propaganda. My observations led me to believe more nearly in Lenin's quote "Political power comes out of a barrel of a gun." The failure of the "general uprising" during Tet '68 would tend to confirm this. The North Vietnamese leaders deserve our admiration for their tenacity......not much else.

This book is far from a handbook of PAVN. I would that it were not so far from one.
Kulafyn
People's Army of Vietnam

In this work, "PAVN: People's Army of Vietnam" by Douglas Pike, the American authority on the history of the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and Vietnamese communism, discusses the history and heritage of the PAVN and its organization, administration, political leadership, and strategy. Pike explains how a small, underdeveloped, poverty-ridden country created the third largest military force in the world. Included in this volume are biographical summaries of PAVN leaders.