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by David Halberstam

Download Coldest Winter ePub
  • ISBN 023073619X
  • ISBN13 978-0230736191
  • Language English
  • Author David Halberstam
  • Publisher Macmillan Hardback Omes; 1st PAPERBACK edition (2008)
  • Formats mobi doc lrf txt
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Military
  • Size ePub 1949 kb
  • Size Fb2 1286 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 635

"In a grand gesture of reclamation and remembrance, Mr. Halberstam has brought the war back home."--The New York Times

David Halberstam's magisterial and thrilling The Best and the Brightest was the defining book about the Vietnam conflict. More than three decades later, Halberstam used his unrivaled research and formidable journalistic skills to shed light on another pivotal moment in our history: the Korean War. Halberstam considered The Coldest Winter his most accomplished work, the culmination of forty-five years of writing about America's postwar foreign policy.

Halberstam gives us a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. He charts the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu River and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides astonishingly vivid and nuanced portraits of all the major figures-Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway. At the same time, Halberstam provides us with his trademark highly evocative narrative journalism, chronicling the crucial battles with reportage of the highest order. As ever, Halberstam was concerned with the extraordinary courage and resolve of people asked to bear an extraordinary burden.

The Coldest Winter is contemporary history in its most literary and luminescent form, providing crucial perspective on every war America has been involved in since. It is a book that Halberstam first decided to write more than thirty years ago and that took him nearly ten years to complete. It stands as a lasting testament to one of the greatest journalists and historians of our time, and to the fighting men whose heroism it chronicles.


Halberstam considered The Coldest Winter the best book he ever wrote, the culmination of forty-five years of writing . Most important, David Halberstam is being too subjective or pre-biased in this book.

Halberstam considered The Coldest Winter the best book he ever wrote, the culmination of forty-five years of writing about America's postwar foreign policy. Up until now, the Korean War has been the black hole of modern American history. The Coldest Winter changes that. When it came to American politics, the author's opinion about the two opposing parties was so strong that readers simply got conclusion even before they saw any facts. It's very hard for any author to be completely objective in expressing himself or describing an event, but at least he can show some objectiveness.

The Coldest Winter' is the best kind of history book David Halberstam's book is a valuable source to understand what happened in Korea and how America eventually lost her way in Vietnam.

The Coldest Winter' is the best kind of history book. The complexity and moral ambiguity of war are front and center. David Halberstam's book is a valuable source to understand what happened in Korea and how America eventually lost her way in Vietnam. 11 people found this helpful.

David Halberstam’s last book, a study of the Korean War, is directed simultaneously to battle buffs and pacifists, history .

David Halberstam’s last book, a study of the Korean War, is directed simultaneously to battle buffs and pacifists, history enthusiasts and political moralists. David Halberstam discovered his calling in Vietnam, watching men die for a strategic lie. A gutsy reporter not yet 30, he warned of a quagmire in the making by a government in denial. It made him angry, then famous, and he became a lover not of war but of war stories, the grit and stink of combat, be it military, political, bureaucratic or some combination thereof.

David Halberstam (April 10, 1934 – April 23, 2007) was an American journalist and historian, known for his work on the . The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, the last book Halberstam completed, was published posthumously in September 2007.

David Halberstam (April 10, 1934 – April 23, 2007) was an American journalist and historian, known for his work on the Vietnam War, politics, history, the Civil Rights Movement, business, media, American culture, and later, sports journalism. He won a Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1964 Contents. 1 Early life and education.

The Coldest Winter book.

David Halberstam's magisterial and thrilling The Best and the Brightest was the defining book for the Vietnam War. More than three decades later, Halberstam used. In a grand gesture of reclamation and remembrance, Mr. Halberstam has brought the war back home. -- The New York Times David Halberstam's magisterial and thrilling The Best and the Brightest was the defining book about the Vietnam conflict.

Halberstam considered The Coldest Winter his most accomplished work, the culmination of forty-five years of writing about America's postwar foreign policy. Halberstam gives us a masterful narrative of the political decisions and miscalculations on both sides. He charts the disastrous path that led to the massive entry of Chinese forces near the Yalu River and that caught Douglas MacArthur and his soldiers by surprise. He provides astonishingly vivid and nuanced portraits of all the major figures-Eisenhower, Truman, Acheson, Kim, and Mao, and Generals MacArthur, Almond, and Ridgway.

Halberstam helps explain how the defeat of the Nationalists triggered some sense in Americans that the US had lost to. .Since the US had said Korea was not under their protection Mao saw an opportunity and he equally could not back down once he was committed to action.

Halberstam helps explain how the defeat of the Nationalists triggered some sense in Americans that the US had lost to Mao. He does a great job refuting that but showing how the Republicans and Joseph McCarthy used this issue to show the Democrats as weak on Communism and trigger the Redbaiting that destroyed so many careers and reputations. And of course could Stalin have it any better? The US tied up in Korea fighting a very large Chinese army?

Other Books by David Halberstam. Glossary of Military Terms. Every effort has been made to update the maps in The Coldest Winter to a modified version of the standard MIL-STD-2525B common warfighter symbology used by the .

Other Books by David Halberstam.

Talk about Coldest Winter


Hanad
I have expected much from David Halberstam's <The Coldest Winter>. It has an outstanding name, which showed the author's cleverness, wide audience on Amazon and not too many peer accounts about Korean War. So it's not a hard choice to choose this one among so few choices. But it turned out that to read Mr. Halberstam's book is a truly tedious effort without much enlightenment.

Briefly speaking, first, it talked too much about background. At the beginning, I thought it's a good thing to know some facts beyond the war itself. So I was happily reading about MacArthur's past before the war. Then there came a long story about MacArthur's parents. What? I continued my reading until I encountered several pages about his grandparents. What? Are you kidding me? I paid to know about the KOREAN WAR, not somebody's family lineage! Not just about MacArthur, many other irrelevant details are abound in the book.

Secondly, the book has done poorly describing the war itself. With much space occupied by irrelevant details, only few pages are left to the war progression, which readers really care about. When it came to a specific battle, so many names emerged that you have to spend much of your brain power to mesmerize and forget all the names later. I once tried to read just the first sentence of each paragraph, and found that I lost nothing about the war. Then I just read one sentence per page, the understanding was still there without abruption. In the most extreme cases, I simply skipped 10 pages and continued the book rather well.

Most important, David Halberstam is being too subjective or pre-biased in this book. When it came to American politics, the author's opinion about the two opposing parties was so strong that readers simply got conclusion even before they saw any facts. It's very hard for any author to be completely objective in expressing himself or describing an event, but at least he can show some objectiveness. Dr. Kissinger has done quite a good job in this aspect in his widely-read book <Diplomacy>.

After 2008 financial crisis, too many books came out about this crisis. Korean War means much more to American history and Eastern Asians than the 2008 crisis (I have to admit this is my pre-bias). So I was quite shocked when I didn't see many historic accounts about the Korean War. My expectation is very simple. If anyone could write a chronicle-like book, without any exaggeration about either side and with enough details about the war itself, I would be much satisfied.
Kegal
It was towards the end of the book for me to finally understand why Mr. Halberstam titled his work 'The Coldest Winter' instead of Winters being plural. The author focused the majority his book on the beginning of the war (June 25, 1950) through to a decisive battle at Chipyongni (February 13-15, 1951). The Chinese came to the rescue of the North Koreans on October 26, 1950. That winter saw temperatures dropping as low as minus-forty degrees without considering the windchill factor. Mr. Halberstam does an excellent job of clarifying for me why we got involved in the whole mess to begin with. The war had nothing to do with strategic value. At its core, the Korean War was simply about multiple egos needing to satisfy their superiority over others.

The book explains the objectives and motivations of Joseph Stalin, Mao Zedong, North Korea's Kim Il-sung, South Korea's Syngman Rhee, China's former leader Chiang Kai-shek, the Truman Administration, General Douglas MacArthur, General Matthew Ridgway, and other notables. What 'The Coldest Winter' does so well is place the Korean War in the broader context of the region's history and how cultural misunderstandings and prejudices caused the conflict. Man, it continues to depress me how cavalier some leaders can be with human lives, especially their own people. The author attempts to analyze the mindsets of such monsters as Stalin and Mao as well as some U.S. officers and political leaders. Especially in the United States, presidents are sometimes in control and, at other times, they are pulled along by political forces beyond their command. General MacArthur and his toady General Ned Almond are placed in an especially negative light in the book. Mr. Halberstam also shows how all military engagements involve varying levels of political infighting by different officers. The U.S. military has chains of command, but subtle forms of insubordination are rampant. The author's depictions of certain battles are edge-of-your-seat stuff. The book includes twenty-five helpful black-and-white maps but no photos. I also found the glossary of military terms at the beginning of the book to be quite helpful.

The book's epilogue gives a remarkable assessment of the Korean War's continuing ripple effects, even today. 'The Coldest Winter' is the best kind of history book. It varies from giving a broader perspective of political machinations at play as well as detailed accounts of combat. The complexity and moral ambiguity of war are front and center. There are stories of heroism, cowardice, bravery, and farce. However, despite the author's descriptions of General MacArthur's power and hubris, I am still at a loss how such a megalomaniac was able remain a power onto himself and could so easily be insubordinate to our country's Commander in Chief, especially in some very public displays. The late William Manchester's highly praised 'American Caesar' is going to be on my future reading list to hopefully give me a clearer picture of the narcissist. 'The Coldest Winter' has not one dull moment in its nearly 670 pages.
Bumand
If you're unfamiliar with the Korean War, you will find this an easy book to read. However, it's not a study of the war in terms of campaigns or actions taken by the belligerents, so you aren't going to get a blow-by-blow picture of how the war progressed. Rather, this is mostly a study in background and some of the primary personalities involved, with coverage of just a very few particular events tossed in. In particular, MacArthur takes a real beating in this book, which I think is utterly deserved, but there are many other books that do likewise. Some other people also get the spotlight, particularly national leaders, military commanders and American soldiers on the ground. It really is an easy read and there's plenty of information on history and policies that led to and shaped the war. On that level, it works very well, and I enjoyed the book. But if you're wanting a treatment of the military events in chronological order or by major battles, then this isn't really what you are looking for. The vast majority of the book covers the period from the start of the war (and its genesis) to the time Mac is fired, which leaves little coverage of the final two-plus years of the war. And it's from that those months that the book derives its name, a period of time in which my dad served in Korea and knows exactly what "coldest winter" means.