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by Gordon W. Prange,Donald M. Goldstein

Download Miracle at Midway ePub
  • ISBN 0070506728
  • ISBN13 978-0070506725
  • Language English
  • Author Gordon W. Prange,Donald M. Goldstein
  • Publisher McGraw - Hill; 1st edition (September 1, 1982)
  • Pages 469
  • Formats lrf rtf mobi lrf
  • Category History
  • Subcategory Military
  • Size ePub 1481 kb
  • Size Fb2 1501 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 248

A close-up look at the battle of Midway Island analyzes this crucial naval victory, which marked the turning point for the American fleet in the Pacific theater of World War II

Yet, the Aleutian operation was also intended as a feint by a relatively weak force that would draw US forces away from Midway.

Ships from and sold by BEST STORE BOOKS. Yet, the Aleutian operation was also intended as a feint by a relatively weak force that would draw US forces away from Midway.

Miracle at Midway reveals how America won its first and greatest victory of the Pacific war-and how easily it could have been a loss. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Donald M. Goldstein (1931–2017) was a retired United States Air Force officer; professor emeritus of public and international affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, where he taught for thirty-five years; a winner of two Peabody Awards; and author of many books. He also taught at the Air Force Academy, the Air War College, the Air Command and Staff College, the University of Tampa, and Troy State University. He was considered the leading authority on the Pearl Harbor attack.

Gordon W. Prange with Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine V. Dillon. When the late Gordon W. Prange, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, passed away in 1980, he left behind several manuscripts in various stages of completion

Gordon W. Prange, Professor of History at the University of Maryland, passed away in 1980, he left behind several manuscripts in various stages of completion. The first of these, a massive study of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, came to light in a condensed version in November 1981 under the title At Dawn We Slept: The Untold Story of Pearl Harbor.

Miracle at Midway reveals how America won its first and greatest victory of. .Gordon W. Prange (1910–1980) was a professor of history at the University of Maryland and a World War II veteran. This stirring, even suspenseful narrative is the first book to tell the story of the epic battle from both the American and Japanese sides (Newsday). Miracle at Midway reveals how America won its first and greatest victory of the Pacific war-and how easily it could have been a loss. He served as the chief historian on General Douglas MacArthur’s staff during the postwar military occupation of Japan.

Miracle at Midway - Gordon W. Prange. Readers of that book will recognize many of the personalities here. In particular, several of the Japanese friends whom he interviewed in connection with Pearl Harbor were also veterans of Midway, or had studied the subject.

Miracle at Midway book. Jun 20, 2015 Everydayreader1 rated it it was amazing

Miracle at Midway book. Jun 20, 2015 Everydayreader1 rated it it was amazing. Miracle at Midway by Gordon W. Prange, Donald M. Dillon is a fascinating read for those of us who have a passion for all things WWII. What made this such an interesting read for me is the way in which the authors presented the Midway experience from both the American and Japanese perspectives.

The sweeping narrative takes readers into the thick of the action and shows exactly how American strategies and decisions led to the triumphant victory that paved the way for the defeat of Japan. -Publisher description. Includes bibliographical references (p. 446-455) and index.

Fortunately, there is no shortage of worthwhile books about the Pacific Wa. Prange’s other major contribution to the literature on the Pacific War is the wide-ranging study Miracle at Midway (by Gordon Prange with Donald M. Goldstein and Katherine Dillon, McGraw-Hill, 1982). Once again, the question that interests the authors is why it happened: The answer they offer is good intelligence work, courage, highly trained pilots, and luck.

In Miracle at Midway, Gordon W. Goldstein, and Katherine V. Dillon show how America won its first and greatest victory of the Pacific war - and how easily it could have been a defeat. involved to make the story interesting throughout the whole book. I liked it so much I will read/listen to Gordon Prange's other books. What was one of the most memorable moments of Miracle at Midway?

Talk about Miracle at Midway


FireWater
There was so much information in Miracle at Midway, that at times I felt overwhelmed. Nearly half of the book is the Appendix, which contains voluminous notes and references. There is no doubt that this book was well researched using original documents from historical archives. However, there was often so much detail that it was difficult to see the forest through the trees. It almost seemed like every sailor, airman (both American and Japanese), and marine who took part in this battle was specifically mentioned by name!

Kidding aside, I really enjoyed the book. The authors pulled no punches. Although the valor and bravery of the outnumbered and outgunned American forces were commendable, they committed mistakes, and the book did a very thorough job of documenting them. However, it was clear that the mistakes the Japanese committed were far greater both in number and consequence, starting with the battle plan itself. The Japanese tried to accomplish three goals simultaneously: the invasion of Midway, an invasion of the Aleutian Islands, and the destruction of the American Navy by drawing the entire Pacific Fleet into a decisive engagement with a far superior Japanese force. Yet, the Aleutian operation was also intended as a feint by a relatively weak force that would draw US forces away from Midway. So the question is how were the Japanese going to destroy the American Fleet at Midway by drawing it into the Aleutian Islands? Most historians credit breaking the Japanese code as the determining factor in the Battle of Midway, but it's hard to imagine that this battle plan would have succeeded in any event with so many parts and such conflicting objectives.

I recommend the book, although it is not a particularly easy read. There were quite a few typographical errors, which could have been just in the Kindle version. The glossary of abbreviations in the Appendix was not very useful in the Kindle edition, because it's almost impossible to navigate back and forth between it and the main body of the book. This left me scratching my head quite a few times over the meanings of some of the mote cryptic abbreviations. For those reasons, I gave tue book only four stars instead of five.
Dagdardana
This book presents an excellent detailed account oi the events that lead to the battle of Midway in June of 1942. The accounts of Japanese thought processes and the one sided exercises they used in planning the attack show how much overconfidence played a role in the outcome. On the American side the book clearly illustrates that breaking the Japanese code was not the sole source of the US victory. Admiral Nimitz's code named the location of the US carriers on that June morning as Point Luck and as the battle played out it was a most appropriate designation. The outcome of the battle eventually hinged on the skill, tenacity, bravery and good luck of the American forces as well as the poor decisions and bad luck of the Japanese. One comment I read about this book complained that it read like a history book. Well, that's what it is. A comprehensive history of a couple of days in June of 1942 and the events that lead there.
melody of you
I read this after the authors’ book on Pearl Harbor. It is very detailed in the telling of the battle. However, I have to admit it lacks the thematic links that hold the Pearl Harbor book together. Granted, Midway is not quite the mystery that Pearl Harbor was. Thus, perhaps it does not lend itself to the same dramatic treatment. My advice is to read the Pearl Harbor book first. Then, as you read this one, you will notice some fascinating parallels between American complacency in the run up to Pearl and Japanese complacency in the run up to Midway.
GEL
I watched the movie “Midway” when I was about 8 and read about the Dec 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor when I was about 11. My friends and I, having no money to pay the ticket, sneaked into the cinema unnoticed... Today, having had read of Pearl Harbour from Mitsuo Fuchida’s book and now from this wonderful book, I can say that, at 63, I understand both events better than the majority of the American people. Visiting the ship at Pearl Harbor a few years ago, I wished I had lived in those days and had taken part in those battles. As an admiral, of course..,
Winenama
This is a very detailed account of the battle of Midway, fought in the early stages of the U.S. involvement in World War II. Gordon Prange has done considerable research in preparation for the writing of this book, telling the story from both the United States' side of the battle as well as that from the Japanese point of view. The battle was a turning point for the U.S. in the Pacific, stemming from a large amount of luck and tremendous courage on the part of the Navy pilots, many of whom gave their lives in fighting the battle. The ability of the code breakers in being able to break the Japanese codes, and the wisdom of the top admirals to act upon the information given as a result of the codebreakers helped to bring about this turning point in the Pacific.
Manazar
Prange was MacArthur's chief historian and had access to materials no one else had. This book was written as a companion to "At Dawn We Slept"--the definitive history of Pearl Harbor (and main debunker of various conspiracy theories). After the way, Prange and Co had unique access to the Japanese officers who planned and fought these battles. And they are very well written. This must be the 3rd or 4th copy I've bought.
Fohuginn
I've read this book many times, over many years. I know the story but still enjoy the telling. Meticulously researched, on both sides, it tells an incredible story of the David and Goliath encounter of a small but forewarned American fleet versus the much more powerful Japanese fleets. The outcome was truly a miracle as the title states.