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Download Who Are the Puritans?...and What Do They Teach ePub

by Erroll Hulse

Download Who Are the Puritans?...and What Do They Teach ePub
  • ISBN 0852344449
  • ISBN13 978-0852344446
  • Language English
  • Author Erroll Hulse
  • Publisher Evangelical Pr (July 1, 2000)
  • Pages 1
  • Formats lrf mbr lit azw
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1854 kb
  • Size Fb2 1918 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 159


I cannot commend this book too highly enough. Pastor Hulse has done a great service in giving us a clear, readable book that makes the Puritans come alive and shows their vital importance to us today

I cannot commend this book too highly enough. Pastor Hulse has done a great service in giving us a clear, readable book that makes the Puritans come alive and shows their vital importance to us today. Should we care about the Puritans? If we are concerned about honoring God and seeing His kingdom advance, the answer is a resounding YES!.

And What Do They Teach by Erroll Hulse. More insights from your Bible study - Get Started with Logos Bible Software for Free! Related Topics

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780852344446.

Who Were The Puritans? Puritans Arrive in America . First came the Pilgrims in the 1620s. The Puritans believed God and His worship were important enough to reserve at least one full day out of the week, and the original Puritan settlers joyfully devoted Sunday to the Lord. Sermons were central to the intellectual life of the Puritans, and they rarely were less than an hour in length. Times of prayer could also be as long. The first book printed in America was the Whole Book of Psalms (or Bay Psalm Book), a metrical version of David's psalms printed in 1640.

and What Do They Teach. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. and What Do They Teach. Published July 2000 by Evangelical Press.

In the early 17th century, thousands of English Puritans colonized North America, mainly in New England. Puritans were generally members of the Church of England who believed that the Church of England was insufficiently reformed, retaining too much. Puritans were generally members of the Church of England who believed that the Church of England was insufficiently reformed, retaining too much of its Roman Catholic doctrinal roots, and who therefore opposed royal ecclesiastical policy under Elizabeth I of England, James I of England, and Charles I of England.

Definition of Puritanism Just who were the Puritan writers? They were not only the two thousand ministers who were ejected from the . Soli Deo Gloria, 1997), and Erroll Hulse’s Who are the Puritans? and what do they teach? (Darlington, England: Evangelical Press, 2000).

Definition of Puritanism Just who were the Puritan writers? They were not only the two thousand ministers who were ejected from the Church of England by the Act of Uniformity in 1662, but also those ministers in England and North America, from the sixteenth century through the early eighteenth century, who worked to reform and purify the church and to lead people toward godly living consistent with the Reformed doctrines of grace. Then move on to James I. Packer’s A Quest for Godliness: The Puritan Vision of the Christian Life (Wheaton, Ill.

The Puritans were members of a religious reform movement known as Puritanism that arose within the Church of England in the late 16th century

The Puritans were members of a religious reform movement known as Puritanism that arose within the Church of England in the late 16th century. They believed the Church of England was too similar to the Roman Catholic Church and should eliminate ceremonies and practices not rooted in the Bible. Puritans felt that they had a direct covenant with God to enact these reforms.

Who were the English Puritans? When the 16th-century Reformation took . They taught that we ought not to be discouraged by the darkness that prevails. We can always expect the fierce opposition and hatred of Satan.

Who were the English Puritans? When the 16th-century Reformation took place three distinct sectors of reformation developed: the German, the Swiss (including France) and the English. Of these three the weakest and least hopeful was the English. The Puritans excelled in preaching in a practical way and many of their sermons reflect this concern to be practical.

Talk about Who Are the Puritans?...and What Do They Teach


Xcorn
This book teaches how much we should value the example of the Puritans, who were not at all like the stereotypical way they are represented today. They truly obeyed Rom. 12:1 and presented their bodies as living sacrifices to their Savior.
Mr.Twister
I think Puritans get a bad rap -- reading this book is giving me a perspective I've not had before. I'm really enjoying it & couldn't recommend it enough!!!
Ger
Hulse's little book gives a fine overview of Puritan history and the context in which they lived, worked, and worshipped God. The book is conveniently divided into three parts. Section I identifies the Puritans and overviews them historically; Section II introduces the reader to a few prominent Puritan writers; and Section III addresses questions regarding their doctrine. Six appendixes are also included, which are well-worth the time. His book is slightly dated, but it is still useful and would serve nicely for a reading/theology study group. Pick up a copy!
NI_Rak
The writings of the 17th century English Puritans were largely neglected for much of the 20th century. Not so now. Extensive republishing of Puritan material by the Banner of Truth and more recently Soli Deo Gloria here in the US has made these mighty works available once more to a wider audience. This book will urge many to delve into the wealth of juicy material that is once again available.
The title sums up the entire book. Divided neatly into three parts, the first two answer the question, "Who are the Puritans", and the third answers the question, "what do they teach?" The book is very attractively presented; the text is laid out in a variety of different fonts and is well illustrated. Written in a very readable style, it should appeal to a broad readership, perhaps especially a younger audience than a book on this subject may normally reach.
The author expresses his aim in the introduction as follows: "I want to create enthusiasm for the Puritans in order to profit from their practical example and benefit from their unique balance of doctrine, experience and practice...Teaching which engenders holy living and stability is vastly needed. Historically, the Puritan epoch is best able to supply this need for they were strongest where the churches in general are weakest today". Hulse persuasively argues that the Puritans' writings are ideally suited to the present-day trends of Postmodernism, Neo-orthodoxy, Fundamentalism, The New Evangelicalism, Pentecostalism, Shallow Evangelism, Reconstructionism, Broad Evangelicalism, and Hyper-Calvinism.
Part One is entitled "The Story of the Puritans", and provides an overview of the history of the Puritan movement. Some helpful timelines and illustrations guide us through the development of the movement from before the Reformation to the decline of the movement after the Restoration of Charles II.
Part Two focuses in on the lives of 24 individual Puritans. Some are familiar names to many of us - Thomas Watson, John Owen, John Bunyan, and Richard Baxter. Others are less known, such as the Baptists Knollys and Jessey. Each biography is brief (approx. 1 page) and contains a portrait and a bibliography of their books that are currently in print.
Part Three is perhaps the most important section of the book. Entitled "Help from the Puritans", it makes up one half of the book, and supplies many quotations from the Puritans on many subjects that are of particular importance in our day. These include: The Puritans' stable doctrine of divine sovereignty and human responsibility, the Recovery of the Lord's Day, Marriage and the family, a Robust Doctrine of Assurance, Eschatological hope, The Primacy of Expository preaching, the Reality of Sin. These mini-essays provide a wealth of helpful material.
Finally there are six interesting appendices on related topical and historical subjects, such as, "Were the Puritans Narrow-minded Bigots?", "The Reformation in Scotland", "The Ongoing Influence of the Puritans". An extensive bibliography is also provided for further research.
I would particularly recommend this book to teens and to home-schooling parents as a useful history textbook covering the Puritan period from the Reformation to the Restoration, but also to any reader who would like an introduction to this important period and her uniquely gifted preachers.
Marilace
The Puritans have a decidedly bad popular image in the United States today. They seem to be generally regarded as a bunch of morbid men whose hard-to-read writings peversely interpreted Christianity in a way that is comic at best and dangerous at worst. English Reformed Baptist pastor Erroll Hulse rescues them from this image and restores them to their proper place as people to whom we should pay attention in this great new study of them. Canadian church history professor Michael Haykin tells us in the Foreword: "We ignore the Puritans at our peril. Their firm grasp of the verities of Chrisitianity, their commitment to seeing those truths worked out in the context of the local church and, above all, the Christ-centered passion of their spirituality, can teach us much." Pastor Hulse then, after an introductory chapter on the relevance of the Puritans, deals with his subject in three sections. Part I gives a historical overview of the English Puritan movement, dealing with early beginnings, development, flowering, and legacy. Part II is the lives of prominent Puritans, (organized primarily by the three generations of men during the century that Puritanism flourished in England), such as John Dod, Robert Bolton, Richard Sibbes, Jeremiah Burroughs, Thomas Goodwin, Thomas Manton, John Owen, Richard Baxter, and John Bunyan. Part III gives us help from the Puritans, how their theology still is amazingly relevant to issues facing us today. There are also six useful appendices, the first of which is an objective examination of the question "were the Puritans narrow-minded bigots?" I cannot commend this book too highly enough. Pastor Hulse has done a great service in giving us a clear, readable book that makes the Puritans come alive and shows their vital importance to us today. Should we care about the Puritans? If we are concerned about honoring God and seeing His kingdom advance, the answer is a resounding YES!