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Download The Star of Bethlehem : The Legacy of the Magi ePub

by Michael R. Molnar

Download The Star of Bethlehem : The Legacy of the Magi ePub
  • ISBN 0813527015
  • ISBN13 978-0813527017
  • Language English
  • Author Michael R. Molnar
  • Publisher Rutgers University Press (September 1, 1999)
  • Pages 208
  • Formats lrf docx azw rtf
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1522 kb
  • Size Fb2 1456 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 372

Could the $50 purchase of an ancient coin by a Rutgers astronomer have unlocked the mystery of the Christmas Star? For years, scientists have looked, with little success, to astronomical records for an explanation of the magical star that guided the Magi to Christ’s manger. Intrigued by the image he found on the latest addition to his coin collection, Michael Molnar thought there might be more to learn by looking, instead, at the teachings of ancient astrologers.

Molnar argues in his book that the Star of Bethlehem was not a star at all, but rather a regal portent centering around the planet Jupiter that was eclipsed by the moon. He bases this theory on the actual beliefs of astrologers, such as the Magi, who lived around the time of Christ. Molnar found some intriguing clues to the mystery while researching the meaning of astrological symbols he found an ancient coin, which bore the image of Aries looking back at a star. He found that Aries was a symbol of Judea at the time, and that ancient astrologers believed that a new king would be born when the moon passed in front of Jupiter. Molnar wondered, could the coin have been issued as a response to the Great Messianic Portent, the Star of Bethlehem?

To match the story of the appearance of the Christmas star, Molnar also knew the event had to happen when Jupiter was “in the east.” Using these criteria and a computer program, he was able to chart an eclipse of Jupiter in Aries on April 17, 6 B.C., a day when Jupiter was precisely “in the east,” which confirmed his theory. Moreover, he found that a Roman astrologer described the conditions of that day as fitting the birth of a “divine and immortal” person.

According to Harvard University Professor Owen Gingerich, “this is the most original and important contribution of the entire 20th century” about the Magi’s star. Using clues from astronomy, astrology, and history, Molnar has created a provocative, fascinating theory on the Christmas Star. He weaves together an intriguing scientific detective story which resolves one of the world’s greatest mysteries: The Star of Bethlehem at the birth of Christ.


Dr Michael R Molnar, astronomer and physicist, proposes that Star of Bethlehem was planet Jupiter, seen in. .The Star of Bethlehem has been called many things by many people: a comet, a conjunction of planets, a supernova, a miracle, a myth

Dr Michael R Molnar, astronomer and physicist, proposes that Star of Bethlehem was planet Jupiter, seen in constellation Aries the ram; photo (M. The Star of Bethlehem has been called many things by many people: a comet, a conjunction of planets, a supernova, a miracle, a myth. That question has attracted yet another answer, one that is gaining attention from historians of astronomy for its unusual approach.

Molnar argues in his book that the Star of Bethlehem was not a star at all, but rather a regal portent centering around the planet Jupiter that was eclipsed by the moon. He bases this theory on the actual beliefs of astrologers, such as the Magi, who lived around the time of Christ. He found that Aries was a symbol of Judea at the time, and that ancient astrologers believed that a new king would be born when the.

The Star of Bethlehem book. Details (if other): Cancel.

Molnar wondered, could the coin have been issued as a response to the Great Messianic Portent, the Star of Bethlehem?To match the story of the appearance of the Christmas star, Molnar also knew the event had to happen when Jupiter was in the east

Molnar wondered, could the coin have been issued as a response to the Great Messianic Portent, the Star of Bethlehem?To match the story of the appearance of the Christmas star, Molnar also knew the event had to happen when Jupiter was in the east. Using these criteria and a computer program, he was able to chart an eclipse of Jupiter in Aries on April 17, 6 . a day when Jupiter was precisely in the east, which confirmed his theory.

In 1999, Dr. Michael Molnar, a Christian astronomer, published The Star of Bethlehem -The Legacy of the . Michael Molnar, a Christian astronomer, published The Star of Bethlehem -The Legacy of the Magi. His findings included the meaning behind the Ram and Star coins from Antioch along with the most likely heavenly alignment constituting the Star of Bethlehem. My conclusions not only confirm Dr. Molnar’s findings but also show that this Star of Bethlehem motif was used frequently between 6 AD and 253 AD.

Similar books and articles Michael R. Molnar - 2014 - Science, Religion and Culture 1 (3):174.

Similar books and articles. The Star of Bethlehem: The Legacy of the Magi by Michael R. Molnar. Mary Snodgrass - 2000 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 91:773-773. The Star of Bethlehem: A Skeptical View by Aaron Adair. Michael R. The Star of Christ in the Light of Astronomy. Aaron Adair - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):7-29. Mira Ceti and the Star of Bethlehem. IGON'S Der Ursprung der Griechischen Philosophie.

Larson used the Starry Night astronomy computer program along with an article written by astronomer Craig Chester; based in part on the work of Ernest Martin.

Michael R. Molnar, a PhD astronomer, convincingly argues that the identity of the star of Bethlehem has to be sought from the astrological perspective . Molnar's book has given me one of the few 'conversion' episodes in my life

Michael R. Molnar, a PhD astronomer, convincingly argues that the identity of the star of Bethlehem has to be sought from the astrological perspective that held sway at the time and place of the birth of Jesus. He studied that astrology in depth and conveys it to the readers of his book. Molnar's book has given me one of the few 'conversion' episodes in my life. He has shown that all the previous claims about the Star of Bethlehem are provably wrong.

9 After listening to the king, they went on their way. And behold, the star that they had seen when it rose went before them until it came to rest over the place where the child was.

Talk about The Star of Bethlehem : The Legacy of the Magi


Saberblade
The Star of Bethlehem is a perennially favorite topic for planetarium shows, articles, musings, sermons, and books. What could be left at this late date to say about it? Quite a lot, actually. Enough so that two new books, both titled "The Star of Bethlehem" (How original!) and both copyright 1999 are on my desk as I write.
The story about the Star is found only in the Gospel of Matthew. There are three possibilities: 1) The star was a myth - invented by the writer of Matthew or earlier Christians whom he followed, in order to give Jesus appropriately royal auspices for his birth. 2) The star was a miracle provided by God to guide the Magi, even perhaps visible only to them. 3) The star was a natural astronomical event or events. These three are obviously mutually exclusive and exhaustive. If either of the first two possibilities are correct, there is little more to be said; therefore both of our authors give them short shrift.
Both books cover some of the same material in about the same way. Jesus was *not* born on December 25 of 1 BC as worked out by the Scythian monastic scholar Dionysius Exiguus (Denny the Dwarf) in 525 AD. King Herod, of whom the Magi inquired about the birth, died in 4 BC. For other reasons, the birth is fairly firmly dated to between 6 and 4 BC. If the shepherds were `abiding with their flocks by night', the birth did not take place in December. For various reasons, these authors agree that Spring is more likely.
"The Star of Bethlehem - An Astronomer's View", by Mark Kidger, gives a review of all the various suggestions that have been made over the years, finally settling on a combination of events being the sign: a triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in Pisces (the sign Kidger says is associated with the Jews - more on this later) between May and December of 7 BC, with Mars approaching this pair in February of 6 BC, followed by a near-occultation of Jupiter by the Moon in Pisces in February of 5 BC, and then, possibly a nova in March/April 5 BC, as suggested by some Korean and Chinese records.
I would have found this scenario plausible were it not for the second, and to my mind more interesting, book: "The Star of Bethlehem - The Legacy of the Magi" by Michael R. Molnar. There are two problems, as pointed out by Molnar, with the kinds of solutions reviewed, and those eventually suggested, by Kidger. Firstly, they tend to focus on what we as moderns would find to be visually compelling sights in the heavens. But this neglects the fact that the Magi were certainly *astrologers*, most likely Hellenistic rather than Babylonian in their astrological theories. Most of the events put forward would not have been significant to contemporary astrology. Kidger himself makes this point but does not seem to follow through with a close study of Hellenistic astrology as Molnar has made. Secondly, we have the advantage over the Magi of *knowing*, at least approximately, what the correct time frame is, then sifting through a small number a years to find the most significant events during those years. We have to imagine an ongoing community of astrologers, scanning the skies for generations perhaps, and imagine what would have been absolutely unique over many years, and compelling enough to make them undertake an arduous journey. In this light, Kidger's series of events are not so special.
Molnar made a key discovery, beginning with a study of ancient coins, which often incorporated astrological symbols, that Aries was the constellation contemporary astrologers believed controlled the Levant, of which Judea was a part. The identification of Pisces with the Jews is Medieval and hence anachronistic in this context.
When the Magi say "...we have seen his star in the east...", they would have been referring to the helical rising of a star or planet - that is, when it is newly visible in the morning sky rising ahead of the sun. Jupiter had its heliacal rising on April 17 of 6 BC in Aries. On that same day, the moon occulted Jupiter for the second time in a row (previously on March 20). This would have greatly increased the astrological significance of kingly Jupiter. Molnar covers about half a dozen other astrological portents for this day, involving rulers of the trines, exaltations, attendance, and beneficent planets, that space does not permit me to explain in detail. In terms of astrological import, this day is absolutely unique for hundreds of years, and Molnar makes a strong case, to my mind, that he has indeed found the origin of the curious story in Matthew.
Astronomers tend to be instantly dismissive of anything having to do with astrology, even to the extent of neglecting its proper application to a historical problem such as this one. Astrology, like it or not, is an important part of the history of human thought, and of the history of astronomy itself, which grew out of it. Michael Molnar is to be congratulated for shedding light on this ancient way of thinking.
Eyalanev
Professional astronomer Michael Molnar's "The Star of Bethlehem: The Legacy of the Magi" (2000) is destined to become a classic in star studies. This 187-page (hardback) book is well documented with 16 informative pages of endnotes, a helpful 11-page glossary, and a 5-page chronology. Molnar also completes this work with an interesting 9-page appendix entitled "Defining the Position of the Zodiac".

This fascinating book was a quick read for me (I completed it in only a few days). I've also noticed that much of the information herein has been featured on various television documentaries about history's most famous star. I have used its material often in discussions, and for teaching, about Christ's Nativity.

From an ancient numismatic study, Molnar suggests that the arrival of the Magi to Jerusalem and then later in Bethlehem (Matthew 2) may be pinpointed with certain amount of accuracy. Syrian coins, minted just before the birth of Christ, sport a ram together with a star.

This coinage discovery led Molnar to consider the power of the star in the world of late antiquity. Documenting (from ancient star charts and other records) Jupiter as the royal planet in the ancient mind and Aries (the Ram) as a symbol of Judah in the ancient Zodiac, Molnar identifies Jupiter's passage through Aries (in the western sky) during the spring of 6 B.C. (chapter 4). This portent may have convinced the Magi (as avid stargazers east of Palestine) of an immanent regal birth in Israel (page 101).

Molnar's extensive research among the ancient documents leads him to an exciting conclusion- the Magi arrival occurred on April 17, 6 B.C. (the date Jupiter was most prominent to the naked eye in Aries)! Could this date be Jesus of Nazareth's birthday? Molnar seems convinced.

Molnar also talks about various ancient topics (i.e. the Roman Saturnalia, the origins for the official date for Christmas as December 25th, the dating of Herod the Great's death, and much more). The book, additionally, offers several black and white ancient coin photos, a number of ancient zodiac/star charts, maps and drawings of key people from his research.

Molnar's writing style is non technical and persuasive. His coin study is fascinating and the star charts are informative. This is an excellent book and a good gift candidate. It is recommended to all astronomy buffs, teachers, Bethlehem star studiers, students of late antiquity, biblical researchers, and history readers. Order your copy soon.
Wal
Molnar nails it! Finally, a definitive explanation for the elusive Star of Bethlehem. The prior reviewer's criticism about the wobble in the Earth's axis is sour grapes. The fact is, Molnar has tangible evidence for his theory - coins showing the star in Aries on one side, and the Roman province of Judea on the other. Excellent work Molnar! You should be at the Keck!
Pringles
This book by Michael Molnar is a result of his study of the famous Star of Bethlehem. Michael's extensive research on the subject goes far beyond just looking at star charts or decoding what the Bible says. Rather, he researches coins, local history, and historical accounts to determine what the star of Bethlehem really was. This book is great for the amateur astronomer who wants to learn the astronomical significance. However, Michael treats us to a thorough history of the times leading up to Jesus' birth, a look at Herod, and the political climate of the day. This is a must read for anyone who wants to know more about the birth of Jesus and who is fascinated with the star of Bethlehem. Very well done and very enjoyable. I have recommended it to several friends.