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Download Hugh of Amiens and the Twelfth-Century Renaissance (Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West) ePub

by Ryan P. Freeburn

Download Hugh of Amiens and the Twelfth-Century Renaissance (Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West) ePub
  • ISBN 140942734X
  • ISBN13 978-1409427346
  • Language English
  • Author Ryan P. Freeburn
  • Publisher Routledge; 1 edition (November 28, 2011)
  • Pages 296
  • Formats lit lrf txt azw
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1270 kb
  • Size Fb2 1677 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 814

Hugh of Amiens (c. 1085-1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century. During a long life he served as a cleric, Cluniac monk, abbot, and archbishop of Rouen. He wrote a number of works including poems, biblical exegesis, anti-heretical polemics, and most importantly one of the earliest collections of systematic theology, his Dialogues. This book examines all of Hugh's writings to uncover a better understanding not only of this individual, but also of the twelfth-century as a whole, especially the theological preoccupations of the period, including the development of systematic theology and views on the differences of the monastic and clerical ways of life.

This project addresses a neglected strand of Latin Christian culture from the patristic period to the thirteenth century, namely the ways in which the image of becoming a Nazirite, following a. .

This project addresses a neglected strand of Latin Christian culture from the patristic period to the thirteenth century, namely the ways in which the image of becoming a Nazirite, following a volu ntary sacrificial devotional practice in the Old Testament, was adopted and adapted by Christian writers. Looking at typological appropriation of elements of Nazirite tradition enables us to observe hitherto undetected tensions between authority and asceticism in the Latin West and to nuance our understanding of the complex relationship between Judaism and Christianity in the Middle Ages.

11/12th Century Philosophy, Misc in Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy. Similar books and articles. categorize this paper). Peter D. Clarke and Anne J. Duggan, Ed. Pope Alexander III (1159–81): The Art of Survival. Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West.

Hugh of Amiens and the twelfth-century renaissance. Farnham–Burlington, Vt: Ashgate, 2011. Recommend this journal. The Journal of Ecclesiastical History.

series Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West. Hugh of Amiens (c. 1085-1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century. During a long life he served as a cleric, Cluniac monk, abbot, and archbishop of Rouen. He wrote a number of works including poems, biblical exegesis, anti-heretical polemics, and most importantly one of the earliest collections of systematic theology, his Dialogues.

Hugh of Amiens (c. 1085-1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century The series Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West reflects the central concerns necessary for any in-depth study of the medieval Church - greater cultural awareness. The series Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West reflects the central concerns necessary for any in-depth study of the medieval Church - greater cultural awareness and interdisciplinarity.

Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing. Hugh has not attracted much previous academic attention, yet Ryan P. Freeburn considers him worthy of a monograph- "he played a much more central role in the twelfth century than many people realize, especially in the early development of systematic theology" (p. 2). It is a striking claim; whether it is substantiated is a matter of opinion. The writings provide the core for Freeburn's treatment. There is a first, short chapter outlining Hugh's life and career; thereafter, the remaining chapters deal with his works. The book is not a full biography.

Aage Rydstrøm-Poulsen, "Freeburn, Ryan . Hugh of Amiens and the Twelfth-Century Renaissance," Speculum 88, no. 3 (July 2013): 798-800. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Doing Things beside Domesday Book. The Enduring Attraction of the Pirenne Thesis. The Digital Middle Ages: An Introduction. Birnbaum et al. Who Owns the Money? Currency, Property, and Popular Sovereignty in Nicole Oresme’s De moneta. 1085-1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century This book examines all of Hugh’s writings to uncover a better understanding not only of this individual, but also of the twelfth-century as a whole, especially th. This book examines all of Hugh’s writings to uncover a better understanding not only of this individual, but also of the twelfth-century as a whole, especially the theological preoccupations of the period, including the development of systematic theology and views on the differences of the monastic and clerical ways of life. 1085–1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century who, during a long lifetime, served as a cleric, Cluniac monk, abbot and archbishop of Rouen

Hugh of Amiens (c. 1085–1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century who, during a long lifetime, served as a cleric, Cluniac monk, abbot and archbishop of Rouen. This book examines his writings to uncover the theological preoccupations of the period, particularly the development of systematic theology and views on the differences between the monastic and clerical ways of life. 1085-1164) was an important intellectual figure in the twelfth century This book examines all of Hugh's writings to uncover a better understanding not only of this individual, but also of the twelfth-century as a whole, especially th. This book examines all of Hugh's writings to uncover a better understanding not only of this individual, but also of the twelfth-century as a whole, especially the theological preoccupations of the period, including the development of systematic theology and views on the differences of the monastic and clerical ways of life.

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