derrierloisirs.fr
» » Of Revelation and Revolution, Volume 1: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa (Of Revelation Revolution)

Download Of Revelation and Revolution, Volume 1: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa (Of Revelation Revolution) ePub

by Jean Comaroff,John L. Comaroff

Download Of Revelation and Revolution, Volume 1: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa (Of Revelation  Revolution) ePub
  • ISBN 0226114414
  • ISBN13 978-0226114415
  • Language English
  • Author Jean Comaroff,John L. Comaroff
  • Publisher University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (July 9, 1991)
  • Pages 434
  • Formats lit txt mobi rtf
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1894 kb
  • Size Fb2 1718 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 428

"Defining their enterprise as more in the direction of poetics than of prosaics, the Comaroffs free themselves to analyze a vivid series of images and events as objects of analysis. These they mine for clues to the 19th-century contents of the British imagination and of Tswana minds. They are themselves imagining the imagination of others, and they do the job with characteristic aplomb....The first volume creates an appetite for the second."—Sally Falk Moore, American Anthropologist

Jean and John Comaroff’s Of Revelation and Revolution: Christianity, Colonialism, and . The Comaroffs focus on the contestation over signs and meanings at the expense of examining the roles played by particular individuals whose decisions and actions shaped the struggle itself.

Jean and John Comaroff’s Of Revelation and Revolution: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa is a self-described historical anthropology of cultural confrontation (1991:xi) that examines the interaction between Nonconformist Protestant missionaries and the Southern Tswana during the early nineteenth century.

The depth and breath of knowledge the Comaroffs bring to bear on their subject (colonialism and consciousness) is incredible. Their mastery of historical sources, interpretive tools, theoretical approaches, and ethnographic methods is beyond impressive, and the style of writing is lively, witty, and passionate. The benchmark for the kind of anthropology I would like to be able to write. Sep 26, 2015 AskHistorians added it.

All content in this area was uploaded by John Comaroff on Feb 01, 2018. Introduction: new ethical fields and the tness of ethics in Africa - Volume 87 Issue 3 - Astrid Bochow, Thomas G. Kirsch, Rijk van Dijk. work undertaken by missionaries in the area (. Comaroff 1991 and1997). Mqhayi's own autobiography sets out the complex intermingling of Xhosa culture with missionary influence in his own family (1976, . The Sociological Imagination of . Mqhayi: Towards an African Sociology.

Of Revelation and Revolution Vol. 1 : Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa. by John L. Comaroff and Jean Comaroff. Defining their enterprise as more in the direction of poetics than of prosaics, the Comaroffs free themselves to analyze a vivid series of images and events as objects of analysis. These they mine for clues to the 19th-century contents of the British imagination and of Tswana minds. The first volume creates an appetite for the second.

The Comaroffs trace many of the major themes of twentieth-century South African history back to these formative encounters

The Comaroffs trace many of the major themes of twentieth-century South African history back to these formative encounters. The relationship between the British evangelists and the Southern Tswana engendered complex exchanges of goods, signs, and cultural markers that shaped not only African existence but also bourgeois modernity "back home" in England.

Jean Comaroff, John L. Comaroff. University of Chicago Press, 15 Nis 2008 - 434 sayfa

Jean Comaroff, John L. University of Chicago Press, 15 Nis 2008 - 434 sayfa.

Jean and John Comaroff’s Of Revelation and Revolution: Christianity, Colonialism, and . If, as the Comaroffs argue, it was through these new forms of consciousness that the Tswana were able to articulate their resistance to the colonial encounter, we must bear in mind that this resistance – the form recognizable to the European colonizers – might neglect acts of resistance the Tswana found meaningful for themselves.

Jean Comaroff and John L. Jean Comaroff and John L. List of Illustrations Preface Chronology 1. Introduction 2. Preachers and Prophets The Domestication of the Sacred Word 3. Cultivation, Colonialism, and Christianity Toward a New African Genesis 4. Currencies of Conversion Of Markets, Money, and Value 5. Fashioning the Colonial Subject The Empire’s Old Clothes 6. Mansions of the Lord Architecture, Interiority, Domesticity 7. The Medicine of God’s Word Saving the. -Sally Falk Moore, American Anthropologist. Categories: Religion. Издание: 1. Язык: english.

Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa. VOLUME ONE. Jean Comaroff and John Comaroff. The university of chicago press. How, precisely, is consciousness made and remade? And how is it mediated by such distinctions as class, gender, and ethnicity?

Talk about Of Revelation and Revolution, Volume 1: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa (Of Revelation Revolution)


Gunos
Jean and John Comaroff’s Of Revelation and Revolution: Christianity, Colonialism, and Consciousness in South Africa is a self-described “historical anthropology of cultural confrontation” (1991:xi) that examines the interaction between Nonconformist Protestant missionaries and the Southern Tswana during the early nineteenth century. A simplified version of the Comaroffs’ thesis might run as follows: part and parcel of the European missionary endeavor among the Tswana was an attempt to transform the Tswana people on a most basic level. The changes introduced by the missionaries penetrated all aspects of Tswana life, from the way they practiced agriculture, to marriage and rainmaking rituals. Although these changes helped to cultivate dispositions favorable to the political economy of colonization, they were also fundamental components in the way that the Tswana enacted resistance against their colonizers. Implicit in the Comaroffs’ thesis is a version of the Hegelian dialectic: as the missionaries engaged in their program of transformation, colonizing the consciousness of the Tswana, they unwittingly planted the seeds of a self-reflexive perspective through which the Tswana began to see themselves as distinct from their colonizers, and would eventually attempt to overcome this alienation through resistance.
Despite an underlying current of Hegelian dialectic, the overt philosophical concern of the Comaroffs lies in the concept of hegemony. As understood by the Comaroff’s, hegemony is “that order of signs and practices . . . that come to be taken-for-granted as the natural and received shape of the world and everything that inhabits it” (1991:23). Hegemony, although part of ideology, is distinct from it. Ideology refers to the realm where sign and practices become articulated and explicit, and thus open to contestation. One way to think of the distinction between hegemony and ideology made by the Comaroffs would be to draw an analogy with human consciousness: hegemony refers to those ineffable aspects of the self that remain hidden away in the unconscious, while ideology concerns those behaviors and practices that are articulated through conscious thought. Struggle and resistance occur when the taken-for-granted hegemonic signs and practices become enter the conscious realm of ideology.
If the sympathetic reader concedes that the Comaroff’s can even study hegemonic beliefs and practices in the first place, this also requires a bit of faith in their ability to identify not only what was hegemonic for the Tswana, but also what counts as both consent and resistance to hegemony. Interpretation plays a central part in the Comaroffs’ analysis, and as the focus is shifted away from the perceptible realm of institutional structures of colonial control, they begin to distinguish themselves as anthropologists writing history. The colonial encounter becomes a ‘long conversation’, where the vocabulary of science, literacy, and rationality dominate a discourse that the Tswana “had no alternative but to be inducted” (Comaroff and Comaroff 1991:213). If, as the Comaroffs argue, it was through these new forms of consciousness that the Tswana were able to articulate their resistance to the colonial encounter, we must bear in mind that this resistance – the form recognizable to the European colonizers – might neglect acts of resistance the Tswana found meaningful for themselves. This becomes apparent when the Comaroffs discuss the appropriation of Setswana terms into ecclesiastical language: “everyday terms like moruti (“teacher”), which took on the connotation of “minister of the church,” and modumedi (“one who agrees”), which came to imply ‘Christian believer” . . . were subtle acts of appropriation” by the missionaries (1991:218). One wonders if the situation was interpreted differently from the Tswana perspective.
The novelty of Of Revelation and Revolution lies not only in the content of the book, but in the methodological approach the Comaroffs take, and the material that this approach leads them to examine. We might understand their approach as one that seeks to reconcile the synchronic analysis of a society with a diachronic understanding of its history. Central to this reconciliation is an understanding of history that extends beyond narratives of past event to include other modes of representation – clocks, houses, ritual, and so forth. While this orientation allows the Comaroffs to provide an important counterweight to the accounts of colonization that have privileged the use of written sources produced by colonizers, I would also argue that it poses several limitations. The Comaroffs focus on the contestation over signs and meanings at the expense of examining the roles played by particular individuals whose decisions and actions shaped the struggle itself. This approach has been particularly effective for the Comaroffs, but it also reduces the interaction between the Tswana and the missionaries to a kind of binary opposition where individual actions are largely hidden in the background. However, this is not necessarily a problem for the Comaroffs, or an indictment of their method. Examining the origin of binary oppositions, and how they are eventually overcome can also be seen as a continuation of the implicit current of Hegelian dialectic that runs throughout the book.
MEGA FREEDY
Excellent!