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Download The Gay Metropolis 1940-1996 ePub

by Charles Kaiser

Download The Gay Metropolis 1940-1996 ePub
  • ISBN 0965675246
  • ISBN13 978-0965675246
  • Language English
  • Author Charles Kaiser
  • Publisher Boston Houghton Mifflin Company 1997. (1997)
  • Formats docx mbr lrf azw
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1104 kb
  • Size Fb2 1691 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 157

History of gay society and rights from amid WWII to the end of the 20th century.

The Gay Metropolis is a compelling social and political history of modern gay life in America

The Gay Metropolis is a compelling social and political history of modern gay life in America "For hundreds of thousands of gay Americans, New York City is the literal gay metropolis: the place where they have learned how to live openly, honestly, and without shame. But the figurative gay metropolis is much larger: it encompasses every place on every continent where gay people have found the courage and the dignity to be free. The Gay Metropolis is a compelling social and political history of modern gay life in America.

Charles Kaiser's The Gay Metropolis: 1940-1996, a history of gay life centered in New York, is packed with tales of writers and literature. Kaiser provides a kaleidoscope of details and stories that create a vision of how gay people lived, and illuminates a culture that had enormous influence on both New York and American society. Kaiser writes about such luminaries as Gore Vidal, E Charles Kaiser's The Gay Metropolis: 1940-1996, a history of gay life centered in New York, is packed with tales of writers and literature

Here he takes on six decades, beginning with WW II and its aftermath of sexual openness. Nevertheless, Kaiser has done gay men (and others) a service with this brightly toned narrative-many will find a sense of themselves and their experiences in it, warmly affirmed. 33 b&w photos, not seen) (Author tour).

The Gay Metropolis - Charles Kaiser. The Gay Metropolis is the nonfiction equivalent of the fictional The City and the Pillarby Gore Vidal. In The Good Book, which Gomes published in 1996, he points out that when the Bible was written, its authors never contemplated a form of homosexuality in which loving, monogamous, and faithful persons sought to live out the implications of the gospel with as much fidelity to it as any heterosexual believer.

But the figurative gay metropolis is much larger: it encompasses every place on every continent where gay people have .

But the figurative gay metropolis is much larger: it encompasses every place on every continent where gay people have found the courage and the dignity to be free. The Gay Metropolis" is a compelling social and political history of modern gay life in America. Charles Kaiser is the first author to devote equal attention to the personal and the political, alternating between the intimate stories of people as famous as Leonard Bernstein and Gore Vidal and as little known as Sandy Kern, a young Brooklyn woman who first heard the word lesbian when a neighbor spied her with an arm around.

The Gay Metropolis is a story of fusion.

Charles Kaiser is an American author, journalist and academic administrator. In 2018 he was named Acting Director of the LGBTQ Public Policy Center at Hunter College. He is also a nonfiction book critic for The Guardian (US).

The Gay Metropolis is the definitive social and political history of modern gay life in America

The Gay Metropolis is the definitive social and political history of modern gay life in America. Charles Kaiser is the first author to devote equal attention to the personal and the political, alternating between the intimate stories of people as famous as Leonard Bernstein and Gore Vidal and as little known as Sandy Kern, a young Brooklyn woman who first heard the word lesbian when a neighbor spied her with an arm around her girlfriend at the end of. a wartime blackout.

The gay metropolis 1940-1996 by Kaiser, Charles. Are you sure you want to remove The gay metropolis, 1940-1996 from your list?

The gay metropolis 1940-1996 by Kaiser, Charles. Are you sure you want to remove The gay metropolis, 1940-1996 from your list? The gay metropolis, 1940-1996. 1st Harvard ed. by Kaiser, Charles. Published 1998 by Harcourt Brace in San Diego.

The Washington Post A New York Times Notable Book of the Year and winner of a Lambda Literary Award, The Gay Metropolis is a groundbreaking saga of struggle and triumph that was instantly recognized as the most authoritative and substantial work of its kind.

Talk about The Gay Metropolis 1940-1996


Moonshaper
It's almost funny to read how Otis Bigelow (famous to be the most handsome man of the '40s in New York City, and coveted by millionaires and artists) reported as being gay "was an upscale thing to be", but at the same time the author reports as just "across town from Park Avenue swells who entertained him so lavishly in their duplex apartments, a completely different kind of gay life was thriving in Times Square". This was and is New York City, and as in the '40s, also now there is a melting pot of cultures, and each culture wants to reclaim their identity. Otis Bigelow was not wrong as they were not wrong the obvious fairies of Times Square, they were simply navigating in different circles.

The "hidden in plain sight" approach was apparently pretty common in the '40s, and so we learn from the memory of a fund boy from New England who wants to remain anonymous as he went to school with John Fitzgerald Kenney, and between the two, the outcast was Kennedy; but there is also the inside news of how JFK's roommate, Lemoyne Billings, was gay and how he remained family friend even after the president election.

And from the words of many gay men who was there and lived that '40s atmosphere the general opinion is that, you could be gay since you simply didn't flaunt it. One of them cite a certain Mrs. Patrick Campbell who said "My dear, I don't care what people do as long as they don't do it in the street and frighten the horses". That is basically what Otis Bigelow and those other anonymous voices implied, you were free to be gay as far as you were gay inside "private" locations.

And maybe that is the reason why, in a period when civil rights were starting to be a common agenda of many politicians, it was not the same when those rights regarded LGBT people. You were free inside your private home, btw if you were wealthy enough to have that safe home, but you were also captive of your own golden cage.

There is a long session devoted to the gays in the military during the WWII. A nice introduction probably explains how the "Don't Ask Don't Tell" was introduced, but mostly it's about those men who remained (or went back) into the closet, not for the fear of being discovered, but to avoid to be refused the chance to protect their country as soldiers.

In the post-war stories, the one I liked the most is the friendship between Paul Cadmus and E.M. Forster, and how Cadmus was aware of Forster's novel Maurice, a novel the author refused to publish until after his death to not damage his policeman "friend" (who was married).

The '50s is a period of euphoria but apparently it also started the period when being gay was dangerous, and so it should be hidden; if in the '40 you could be gay inside private walls, in the '50s even that freedom was a danger, and the walls of a room became the more confined space of a closet. As for many others, gays became the target of a witch hunt. Maybe for this reason, late in the '50s the main tendency was to "blend" and you see gays people getting married, with or without the knowledge of the wife.

The '60s see a surge of consciences, in all the level of society, and so also among gays and lesbians. New York saw not only the first religious congregation for gays, but also Columbia University became one of the first colleges to give formal recognition to a gay students organization. Homosexuality exited from the closet and arrived in television, with a ground-breaking documentary, The Homosexuals.

The bridge between the '60 and the '70 is Stonewall, and so from that moment on there will be always a pre and post-Stonewall gay and lesbian movement and culture: "although millions would remain in the closet, within a year after Stonewall, thousands of men and women would find the courage to declare themselves for the first time". Not only, being gay, or at least bisexual, was almost "fashionable", and in many media, television, cinema, publishing, the gay characters not only started to make their appearance, they were also, sometime, positively accepted by the mainstream public. And also Forster's Maurice came out of the closet. The '70 see the sexual revolution, a sexual revolution that happened also within the LGBT community.

The '80 and the beginning of the '90 is the Dark Ages of the LGBT community, the AIDS plague killed so many, that almost completely deprived the world of an entire generation. There is visibly a jump, if you browse the net for notably LGBT characters, those born in the '50 and '60 are almost all among the victims. As reported "New York had far more AIDS cases than any other city in America". One man stated "I know 450 people that died of AIDS that I can count. Thirty to 40 of my close friends that I had made from 1967 to today died from this disease". It's painful to read this part of the books, even more painful if you compare it to the energy that you had just felt in the stories of those men of the '50 and '60 and '70, men who were eager to claim their homosexuality.

Maybe due to the imperative of being more mainstream to protect their rights among the massacre that was the AIDS catastrophe, the '90 see the LGBT community enters politics and starting to put their weight on who has to represent them.

It was a long ride to arrive to the end of this book, but it was a very enlightening ride. Charles Kaiser managed to always bring alive the men he is talking about, with their dreams, fears, love and betrayals. It's a wonderful essay that you read like a novel, with the easiness of a collection of short stories, only that the characters in those short stories are real life men and women.
Uscavel
Kaiser's book is good history for anybody- gay or not. It is a chronology of planned and deliberate opression against gay men and women- not only by politicians and psychiatrists, but also by Christian churches. Especially viscious was the Roman Catholic Church. Ironic, isn't it? Kaiser rapidly moves us through history from the time when a gay person was a walking breathing felon just for having been born, to the activist movements of the 80's and 90's. His history on the development of the AIDS epidemic, and the incredible ignorance that surrounded it, both social and professional, is alone worth reading the book. This book has given me a tremendous respect for many of the early gay activists, who I had never even heard of before, who fought against incredible odds in order to assert their right to live as who they are. This book is well researched and has never a dull moment.
Raniconne
I gave this 5 stars because I like how it explores homosexuality from the thirties, clear up until present day! Reading this book gave me a better understanding of the reasons some older gays think the way they do. It also helped me to confirm that the things I experienced growing up gay in the late 70's and 80's wash;t just in my head!

I love the personal interviews, and also the book gives many of the original addressees of the no longer existing bars, and other places that were part of gay history! I can;t wait to visit New York again and see where some of these places actually were!

If you are interested in gay history, and how gay men and women's attitudes have changed, along with society and its acceptance, then this book is for you! I personally couldn't put it down!!
Zargelynd
All history should be this delightful to read -- Kaiser has dug up unknown and forgotten gems of anecdote and behind the scenes maneuvering, showing the deep and vibrant thrum of gay life in New York stretching back over the last century. Wonderful studies and cameos abound, from Lincoln Kirstein to the all-star, all-gay, all-Jewish team that created West Side Story. Devour it!
Gaeuney
This is a sprawling and captivating account of urban gay life in 20th century America. There is a lot of great material here, including fascinating stories of both the famous and the obscure. There are many exhilarating moments, along with the excruciating ones, woven into a coherent narrative. Highly recommended.
Yllk
In "The Gay Metropolis" Charles Kaiser has provided a vivid, entertaining, and compelling account of gay life in 20th century America. The book has appeal for both the politically active individual as well as the casual reader. By utilizing a brisk-paced series of anecdotal accounts and interviews interspersed with background narratives when appropriate, the author has rendered a rich chronicle of gay life and culture, from the New York gay scene in the 1950s to the AIDS epidemic to the era of DADT, Will & Grace, and Brokeback Mountain. Through his research of media archives, historical accounts, and interviews, Kaiser is able to elucidate quite effectively the long history of discrimination, oppression, and tragedies suffered by the gay community, yet the book remains surprisingly upbeat and never gets maudlin or pontifical in tone. In summary, Kaiser has shed considerable light on a burgeoning movement and the quest for acceptance and self-actualization among its members that continues into the 21st century.
Zeleence
A fine chronicle of an movement in American culture that is often misunderstood..
I good overview of the history of gays in America!