derrierloisirs.fr
» » The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version

Download The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version ePub

by Derek Wilson

Download The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version ePub
  • ISBN 0745955592
  • ISBN13 978-0745955599
  • Language English
  • Author Derek Wilson
  • Publisher Lion Hudson; New edition edition (September 23, 2011)
  • Pages 224
  • Formats azw mobi rtf lrf
  • Category History
  • Subcategory World
  • Size ePub 1959 kb
  • Size Fb2 1427 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 241

This is the story of one of the most influential, provocative, ambitious projects of its day: translating the Bible into English, the language of the people. In 1604 the new King James I convened a meeting at Hampton Court to address the problem of the Puritans. The recommendation was for the authorization of a new translation of the Bible, one that would be accessible to the common people and placed in every Church in his realm. Within three years a team of 47 scholars on six committees had begun work in Oxford, Cambridge and Westminster. The fruit of their labours was the Authorized Version published in 1611. Beautifully presented and based on scholarly research, this book traces the fascinating history of the AV from its earliest predecessors through its remarkable influence on the church, literature, and wider society.

The first chapter about the actual translation process is good (it contains the rules for the translation process on pages 89 and 90), but again there are others who have done this more thoroughly.

In 1604 the new King James I convened a meeting at Hampton Court to address the problem of the Puritans. Within three years a team of 47 scholars on six committees had begun work in Oxford, Cambridge and Westminster. The fruit of their labours was the Authorized Version published in 1611.

The People's Bible book. The story of one of the most influential, provocative, ambitious. Details (if other): Cancel.

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the King James Bible (KJB) or simply the Authorized Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed as well as published in 1611 under . .

The King James Version (KJV), also known as the King James Bible (KJB) or simply the Authorized Version (AV), is an English translation of the Christian Bible for the Church of England, begun in 1604 and completed as well as published in 1611 under the sponsorship of James VI and I. The books of the King James Version include the 39 books of the Old Testament, an intertestamental section containing 14 books of the Apocrypha, and the 27 books of the New Testament

In 1604 the new King James I convened a meeting at Hampton Court to address the problem of the Puritans.

Find nearly any book by Derek Wilson. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780312550998 (978-0-312-55099-8) Hardcover, St. Martin's Press, 2010. Find signed collectible books: 'Peter the Great'.

Wilson presents the remarkable personality who oriented Russia toward . All The King’s Women tells us as much about Stuart Britain as it does about the king.

Wilson presents the remarkable personality who oriented Russia toward the West, with lasting historical – and not completely resolved – consequences. Wilson’s portrait is a fine introduction to the man and his reign. Gilbert Taylor, Booklist. Derek Wilson throws fresh light on this somewhat enigmatic figure, bringing the polished courtier and spymaster to vivid life. Out of the Storm – The Life and Legacy of Martin Luther. Interrelates the personal and political dimensions of Charles II's life with an effectiveness that few other biographers have matched Sunday Telegraph.

List of books of the King James Version. These are the books of the King James Version of the Bible along with the names and numbers given them in the Douay Rheims Bible and Latin Vulgate. This list is a complement to the list. This list is a complement to the list in Books of the Latin Vulgate. It is an aid to finding cross references between two longstanding standards of Biblical literature. There are 80 books in the King James Bible-39 in the Old Testament, 14 in the Apocrypha, and 27 in the New Testament.

Majestie: The King Behind the King James Bible. Nashville: Thomas Nelson. The People’s Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version. American christianity is, at the very least, odd. Jennifer Woodruff Tait. Catholics in America. The test of freedom of religion.

item 7 The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version, Derek Wils -The . Jacqueline Wilson Hardback Non-Fiction Books for Children. Bible Studies Hardback Adult Learning & University Books. Hardback Books in English Jacqueline Wilson.

item 7 The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version, Derek Wils -The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version, Derek Wils. This item doesn't belong on this page.

Talk about The People's Bible: The Remarkable History of the King James Version


Ckelond
Excellent Book but a slow read. Might not hold everyone's attention.
Quttaro
The basic difficulty I had with this volume is that it tries to do too much. The opening chapters cover the pre-history of the KJV, but this ends up being about 1/3 of the book. So you don't really get to the KJV until Chapter 4. A pre-history of the KJV is interesting, but there are better and more thorough accounts (see David Norton). The first chapter about the actual translation process is good (it contains the rules for the translation process on pages 89 and 90), but again there are others who have done this more thoroughly. Later there are sections on the "Bible in America" and "The Bible in the British Empire", each only a few pages long which necessarily leads to a truncated presentation. There is a section on "The KJV and the English Language" (four pages), followed by The Bible and Shakespeare (one page), followed by "The Bible and Cultural Change" (two pages). You get the idea; any of these topics could be the focus of an entire book or at least a chapter. It's just not possible to say anything insightful when being so brief.

Wilson discusses the Bible in the Modern World and, once again, it is just too quick to be nuanced. For example, regarding the complex issues of textual criticism and the textual bases of translation, Wilson presents only a single view as if it were a consensus (it isn't) and the dominant view (it isn't). Nor does he offer the reader any references or footnotes so that those who are itnerested can pursue their own study on this matter. To clarify, I'm not being defensive as I often agree with Wilson's conclusions. It's just that I can't see that Wilson took the time to see what scholars in the field are actually saying these days. It's more complicated, and much more interesting, than Wilson suggests.

The book is written in a breezy, reportorial, style. That's a plus. But it is also written with a kind of reporter's cynicism which at times damages the presentation. That's a minus. I wouldn't say that the book has no value. For those who have not read anything about the KJV, this book will give you the basics of how it was created. Beyond that, though, this book can be misleading.