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Download The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick ePub

by Norman Kagan

Download The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick ePub
  • ISBN 0826404278
  • ISBN13 978-0826404275
  • Language English
  • Author Norman Kagan
  • Publisher Continuum Intl Pub Group; Expanded, Subsequent edition (April 1, 1990)
  • Pages 249
  • Formats txt docx lit azw
  • Category Humour
  • Subcategory Movies
  • Size ePub 1195 kb
  • Size Fb2 1196 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 751

Book by Kagan, Norman

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Albeit some of it was interesting, the book is nothing I found original

Albeit some of it was interesting, the book is nothing I found original. At the end of each chapter, however, the author does take it upon himself to interpret the films in a manner in which he sees a destructive, non-sexual, non-emotional Kubrick.

Kagan also seems to miss the entire point of certain films. One wonders why he even bothered writing such a book.

Albeit some of it was interesting, the book is nothing I found original. Kagan also seems to miss the entire point of certain films.

Stanley Kubrick is one of our most brilliant, innovative and difficult filmmakers. Norman Kagan's analysis cuts a lucid path through those difficulties. A major assessment of the great director's work. ISBN13:9780826404220. Release Date:March 1989. Norman Kagan's analysis cuts a lucid path through those difficulties

Stanley Kubrick is one of our most brilliant, innovative and difficult filmmakers. He moreover lists thematic obsessions that run through all the films he describes, offering an intriguing sense of Kubric Stanley Kubrick is one of our most brilliant, innovative and difficult filmmakers.

In Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures, Jack Nicholson recalls that Kubrick said The Shining is an overall optimistic story because "anything that says there's anything . Kagan, Norman (2000). The cinema of Stanley Kubrick. Continuum International Publishing Group.

In Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures, Jack Nicholson recalls that Kubrick said The Shining is an overall optimistic story because "anything that says there's anything after death is ultimately an optimistic story. Stephen King recounts hearing the same thing from Kubrick in conversation with him, and replied, "What about hell?". ISBN 978-0-8264-1243-0.

Items related to The cinema of Stanley Kubrick. Norman Kagan is the author of "The War Film" and other books. He works a a documentary filmmaker and has taught at the New School and elsewhere in the New York City area. Norman Kagan The cinema of Stanley Kubrick. ISBN 13: 9780394178769.

Are you sure you want to remove The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick from your list? . Published November 1995 by Continuum Intl Pub Group There's no description for this book yet.

Are you sure you want to remove The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick from your list? The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick. Published November 1995 by Continuum Intl Pub Group. Motion pictures, Internet Archive Wishlist, Criticism and interpretation, Motion picture producers and directors, Film. He moreover lists thematic obsessions that run through all the films he describes, offering an intriguing sense of Kubrick's career as a whole. Bloomsbury Academic, 29 февр. Stanley Kubrick is one of our most brilliant, innovative and difficult filmmakers.

Published: 1 January 2000. by Bloomsbury Academic. in The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick. The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick; doi:10.

Talk about The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick


Unsoo
First off, I'm giving this one five stars, not because I think it deserves it, but to drive up the overall rating.

Simply put, it's worth about 3.5 stars, not because, as some reviewers have put it, it's terrible. Rather, because, given the amount of Kubrick books on the market, it doesn't hold up to many of them.

The book is a good overview of The Master's works for those who are just looking for something not too involved. Most books about Kubrick offer little nuggets of information others either overlook or outright miss. As a serious Kubrick devotee, I find it a valuable addition to my collection.

If you are a new fan, or are looking for a single book that give you a serious overview of his work, this isn't it.
GWEZJ
Kagan's tome on the works of Stanley Kubrick breaks ranks with the films it seeks to illuminate by accomplishing something those works do not - Kagan's tome is terribly BORING and ultimately says very little about the subjects it hopes to explore.
Yes, the Third Edition covers every Kubrick film right up to Eyes Wide Shut, claiming to be the only book on Kubrick to do so. Even if that boast is true, it does very little to address the glaring flaws that make this book one to be avoided.
While all of Kubrick's films are covered, most of the text on each are rambling, haphazardly written summaries of the films' plots, information we presume a student of Kubrick will find wholly unnecessarily. Worse still, he often spends more time summarizing than examining; 21 pages are devoted to regurgitating the plot of Dr. Strangelove, for instance, with just 11 pages devoted to examining the film. Kagan throws a bit of editorial comment into those summaries, but such content is sparse and rarely enlightening.
The summaries are preceded by a brief - sometimes as brief as a paragraph or two - bit of text introducing the film. Generally speaking, entirely worthless.
Finally, each summary is followed by a half-hearted, and often too brief, attempt to examine the themes of the film and how Kubrick attempted to display those themes. Kagan manages to cut and paste portions of reviews that back his observations, but he rarely presents them in such a way to truly bolster his argument (or make the argument interesting for the reader), and for stretches one wonders just how much actual WRITING Kagan did. These thematic explorations are often so brief as to be frustrating, too. Barry Lyndon fans, for instance, will wonder if Kagan even SAW the film based on the two whole pages it gets.
In the end, however, the book fails because it offers the reader no real insight into the cinema of Stanley Kubrick. Not in the creation of these films; the production; the historical importance; the cinematic importance. Virtually nothing is offered on the history of these productions, how Kubrick went about creating each film, notes of interest, or reasons why the films stand out from the pack - things one would think are essential in a boom called "The Cinema of Stanley Kubrick."
So why two stars for a book so, well, bad? It is a valuable resource in that it summarizes some Kubrick films no longer readily available for viewing. Kubrick students may find some of use for this book in that, at least. Other than that:
SKIP THIS BOOK.
Ffrlel
I don't know why film critics think they can get away with this kind of thing. Imagine if somebody tried to "critique" a novel, a CD, or any other type of work by retelling the narrative (or lyrics, or whatever) in his own words. Dismissed without a second thought, needless to say. But film critics write 'em and get 'em published. To what end, I don't know.
That said, this book plumbs new depths in that it's ALL the author does. There's no technical background or critical apparatus at all, merely scene by scene retellings of the films along with a bit of blather about "themes". The book's errors have been mentioned, but it should be reiterated that these are of a number and level of ignorance that's truly jaw-dropping. (My favorite is Kagan's identification of the drunken Shriners of "Killer's Kiss" as "some kind of street entertainers".)
One of these days, Kubrick will get the film-by-film analysis he deserves. This one ain't even a beginning.
Hamrl
Norman Kagan should get an "editing" credit rather than "author" credit. This book on the cinema of Stanley Kubrick is basically an accumulation of articles, interviews and reviews of his films and his life. Albeit some of it was interesting, the book is nothing I found original. At the end of each chapter, however, the author does take it upon himself to interpret the films in a manner in which he sees a destructive, non-sexual, non-emotional Kubrick. That of obsessive and homicidal. Attempting to make a "connection" in all the films which I believe is poorly attempted. I would move elsewhere to find word on Kubrick and his films.
Cashoutmaster
The main problem with this book is the overall sloppy job of writing. It is clear that the author failed to take notes during the films, for his descriptions are filled with incorrect statements about things as basic as the story and other errors. In his analysis of The Shining, for example, he spends a few pages recounting the plot. In doing so, however, he switches many of the events around and getting them out of order. Furthermore, he also has a habit of getting the names of characters mixed up, or getting the wrongs names altogether. If you're looking for a much better book on Kubrick, try Thomas Nelson's Kubrick: Inside a Film Artist's Maze.
Arador
Not particularling illuminating or informative, at the very least it collects portions of commentaries from some of the best film critics (eg Pauline Kael). Beyond this there is not much positive to say. Often Kagan can't even provide accurate summaries of Kubrick's films (one example is that he confuses the identities of the condemned men in Paths of Glory, and this effectively renders his thematic analysis of that film useless!). Kagan also seems to miss the entire point of certain films. One wonders why he even bothered writing such a book.