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Download Tick... Tick... Tick...: The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes ePub

by David Blum

Download Tick... Tick... Tick...: The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes ePub
  • ISBN 0060558024
  • ISBN13 978-0060558024
  • Language English
  • Author David Blum
  • Publisher Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (October 11, 2005)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats rtf lit azw txt
  • Category Humour
  • Subcategory Television
  • Size ePub 1828 kb
  • Size Fb2 1604 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 183

An insider's view of the most successful show in the history of TV, 60 Minutes.

The most popular TV show in America isn't American Idol, and it's not Survivor. Month in, month out, the most–watched program in America is 60 Minutes, drawing a staggering 25 million viewers in an average week.

For its entire 34–year history, 60 Minutes was the brainchild (and personal fiefdom) of Don Hewitt, the take–no–prisoners visionary who hustled the show into being and kept it afloat with a mixture of chutzpah, tough talk, scheming, and journalistic savvy. But now that Hewitt is 80 and grudgingly considering retirement, the show's direction is increasingly up for grabs, and the transition will surely be marked by some serious fireworks.

As author David Blum provides a fly–on–the–wall perspective on the show's upheavals, he'll also trace its past; although the show has aired some 5,000 pieces and has made household names of Mike Wallace, Ed Bradley, Leslie Stahl, and Morley Safer, much of the backstage story––the passionate pursuit of stories, the behind–the–scenes wrangling, and the stars' prima donnish behavior––has gone untold. With full access to the producers, stars, and executives, Blum will give readers an unprecedented view of the personalities and events that have shaped 60 Minutes – and a new perspective on how current events become news.


David Blum has written regularly for New York Magazine, Esquire, and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Flash in the Pan: The Life and Death of an American Restaurant.

David Blum has written regularly for New York Magazine, Esquire, and the New York Times Magazine, and is the author of Flash in the Pan: The Life and Death of an American Restaurant. He is the television critic for the New York Sun and teaches at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He lives with his wife and children in New York City.

60 minutes (Television program), Television broadcasting of news. New York : HarperCollins Publishers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by abowser on February 2, 2012.

60 Minutes is one of those television icons that all of us know something about. I was pleased to see the many times that Mr. Blum raised ethical issues about what 60 Minutes did or didn't do. Like any show, mistakes happen. My daughter has a list of "The 50 Greatest TV Shows Ever!" on her bulletin board and it lists 60 Minutes in 6th place. But how many of us have watched every broadcast? Probably no one saw them all but those who worked for the show from the beginning. It's often what you do about the mistakes that makes all of the difference.

The Long Life and turbulent times of Sixty Minutes

The Long Life and turbulent times of Sixty Minutes. An insider's view of the most successful show in the history of TV, 60 Minutes. For its entire 34–year history, 60 Minutes was the brainchild (and personal fiefdom) of Don Hewitt, the take–no–prisoners visionary who hustled the show into being and kept it afloat with a mixture of chutzpah, tough talk, scheming, and journalistic savvy. But now that Hewitt is 80 and grudgingly considering retirement, the show's direction is increasingly up for grabs, and the transition will surely be marked by some serious fireworks.

The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes. On the Tuesday afternoon before his final 60 Minutes broadcast on May 30, 2004, Don Hewitt’s belongings are being removed, against his will, from his corner office. All of his possessions have been packed away: his Emmy statuettes, his framed, autographed photographs with presidents from Truman to Bush, his Thomas Kent wall clock, even his huge, glass-topped office desk-the one at which he’d lately been telling everyone he wanted to die.

Book Description The story of how CBS's 60 Minutes grew from a little network experiment into a Sunday-night .

Book Description The story of how CBS's 60 Minutes grew from a little network experiment into a Sunday-night addiction for most of the country would itself make a raucous and typically compelling 60 Minutes episode. For two years, author David Blum talked to everybody, and incredibly, everybody talked to him - about themselves, about the show, about one another.

For example, reading books You can change the settings for your habits at any time by swipe a habit to the . Once you‘re ready to start arranging, long press on a task and drag it onto the calendar, release to set up a date

For example, reading books. TickTick will remind you when it’s time to accomplish a goal. You will then manually record your progress. You can change the settings for your habits at any time by swipe a habit to the left after it’s been created. Tap the button at the top right corner in Habit to enter the settings, then tap Ringtone and make your selection. Once you‘re ready to start arranging, long press on a task and drag it onto the calendar, release to set up a date. If you want to cancel the current action, drag & drop the task onto the x button on the bottom right corner.

Talk about Tick... Tick... Tick...: The Long Life and Turbulent Times of 60 Minutes


Llallayue
Super informative and readable. I would love to know the methodology of collecting all this inside information, but I guess we will never know. A great read and an unmasking of tyrannical producers who, despite being ghastly monsters, set the pace, rule the airwaves and make their staff's life an absolute misery.
Burisi
I grew up watching "60 Minutes." I have always wondered what Mike Wallace, Ed Bradley and the others are really like. Now I know. They're a bunch of brilliant, petty, inspired, horny egomaniacs! The book is fascinating and very often hilarious. "60 Minutes" is a real American institution and now I understand how it became one. In spite of, and because of, the people who created it.
Vareyma
With sand running out in his professional hourglass, Don Hewitt agreed to cooperate in the writing of David Blum's book about SIXTY MINUTES, After years of stalling and a slipshod campaign to engineer a reversal on the part of CBS, Hewitt had been forced out as executive producer of the program he began. This book was to be his valedictory.

It didn't quite work out that way. Blum crawled under the hood and opened the engine. What he found isn't pleasant. SIXTY MINUTES is not a happy family and never has been. Hewitt's style was to hire aggressive people and make them compete with one another for stories, resources, and airtime. The results were predictable.

Some of the correspondents were not on speaking terms. Those who couldn't keep up, such as Harry Reasoner due to illness or Meredith Vierra due to her role as a mother, are cruely ostracized. Most of the real reporting was done by unheralded producers-no news there-and some were treated shabbily by the correspondents. Entertainment often (and increasingly) got in the way of news judgment and ethics.

Hewitt himself comes over as a louse, a womanizer and bully, a man who parlayed a few good ideas into an enormously lucrative career and then, like the proverbial dinner guest (and like Dan Rather, with whose career Hewlett's is intertwined) overstayed his welcome, and in the end even forgot why he'd come.

It isn't a pretty story, but it is a fascinating one. And it's a revealing look into an industry whose owners, to quote McGeorge Bundy, have come to "view it only as a business, when, of necessity, it is so much more."

The book is not perfect. In the breathless rush to move from one episode to the next, Blum gives insufficient attention -a scant ten pages-to the Jeffrey Wigand/tobacco industry story which marked the turning point in Hewlitt's passage from crusader to company man and was a watershed in public comprehension of the dangers of corporate media ownership.

It has its odd moments. Blum observes that in 1948, "videotape wasn't in wide use." That's an understatement. It wasn't even invented until the late fifties.

In another passage, he says of Steve Kroft: "He managed to get himself hired as an investigative reporter at WJXT-TV in Jacksonville, Florida, which, as it turned out, was a hotbed of municipal corruption with no tough reporters to cover it. The ambitious Kroft jumped into the job full force. Within a year, his reporting resulted in the indictment of the mayor of Jacksonville [which is not true] along with a slew of other corrupt city officials [which is]."

Steve worked at WJXT long after these events took place. The reporting was done by Al Parsons and editorial director Norm Davis in 1966. Steve arrived in 1975. One wonders who gave Blum this story and why.

Despite these lapses, it is, as Hewlett would demand, a compelling story.
Road.to sliver
60 Minutes is one of those television icons that all of us know something about. My daughter has a list of "The 50 Greatest TV Shows Ever!" on her bulletin board and it lists 60 Minutes in 6th place.

But how many of us have watched every broadcast? Probably no one saw them all but those who worked for the show from the beginning. Certainly, if you're under a certain age, you haven't watched them all because the show is older than you are.

I was pleasantly surprised to find that Mr. Blum had captured as many of the pivotal stories over the years as possible, both in terms of how they were developed and how they were reported. These stories also include 60 Minutes's biggest flubs and embarrassments. As a result, you can catch up on stories you missed the first time around. You also learn details that you didn't know when you first saw the stories you have seen. And you will find out about the aftermath that was often obscure at the time. The key interview lines and responses are usually in the book.

Beyond that, you find out what it's been like for all of these prima donnas to work together all these years. Predictably, they get on each other's nerves and the blow ups can be explosive. Don Hewitt, the show's executive producer and founder, turns out to be one of those high energy, aggressive people who has a million ideas a minute . . . and most of them are worthless. So he's drove people crazy for all of those years. There's a convincing portrait of how his instinct for entertainment in news added a lot of profits for CBS but often undercut reporting professionalism. You will also learn about the personal vices, quirks and flaws of the key players.

When they weren't on deadline cranking out a story, what were Mike Wallace, Harry Reasoner, Dan Rather, Morley Safer, Ed Bradley, Andy Rooney, Diane Sawyer, Steve Kroft and Lesley Stahl really like? There's plenty of material there, as well as brief bios of how they came to join 60 Minutes.

There's also excellent material for those who are interested in the technical side of production on how the many pioneering techniques that 60 Minutes uses were developed.

Mr. Blum had a lot of individual access to reporters, producers and staff so the extensive public record of the shows themselves and the many books published by the leads is amplified by current observations of long ago and current events. The result makes for dramatic reading, particularly the parts about Don Hewitt being ushered off into retirement.

I was pleased to see the many times that Mr. Blum raised ethical issues about what 60 Minutes did or didn't do. Like any show, mistakes happen. It's often what you do about the mistakes that makes all of the difference. There the record is checkered also at times. Mr. Blum points out the issue, but doesn't rub your nose into it. You're left to draw your own conclusion in a pleasant way.

There's a nice insert of publicity photographs in the book to remind you what Mike Wallace, Harry Reasoner, Morley Safer, Dan Rather, Ed Bradley, Diane Sawyer, Steve Kroft and Meredith Vieira looked like in their prime.

The book is balanced, apparently quite factually accurate, and informational from many perspectives. I think you'll like it if you ever watched 60 Minutes and enjoyed the show.

I should note before concluding that I watched the very first broadcast and seldom missed one for the first 20 years or so of the show's history. Around that time, I lost interest. If a touted segment strikes my fancy now, I'll tune in occasionally. But for me, this show doesn't fit my needs any more. I'm usually watching the pre-show for Sunday Night Football or something else instead. That's too bad. 60 Minutes was once the highlight of the viewing week for me.