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Download A Brief History of Crime ePub

by Peter Hitchens

Download A Brief History of Crime ePub
  • ISBN 1843541483
  • ISBN13 978-1843541486
  • Language English
  • Author Peter Hitchens
  • Publisher Atlantic Books; Main edition (March 31, 2003)
  • Pages 320
  • Formats lit doc docx rtf
  • Category Law
  • Subcategory Constitutional Law
  • Size ePub 1427 kb
  • Size Fb2 1694 kb
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 181

Crime is a political football - both left and right are terrified of seeming "soft" on the issue, but for all their efforts, or apparent efforts, crime rates continue to rise. Clearly something needs to be done. But what? Peter Hitchens argues that the time has come to re-examine the criminal justice system root and branch - to cope with rising levels of violent crime, and to restore public faith in society's ability to defend itself. Whatever you think of the solutions Hitchens suggests to this problem, you can be sure that they will excite controversy.

A Brief History of Crime is the third book by author and journalist Peter Hitchens. Originally published in 2003, it was reissued in 2004 under the new title The Abolition of Liberty.

A Brief History of Crime is the third book by author and journalist Peter Hitchens. The book was described in 2012 by The American Conservative magazine as "a must-read for anyone on either side of the Atlantic". The book challenges a number of commonly held views about the causes of crime, criticising the opinion that crime is caused by poverty or other forms of social deprivation

A Brief History Of Crime Hardcover – April 10, 2003.

A Brief History Of Crime Hardcover – April 10, 2003. by. Peter Hitchens (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

A Brief History Of Crime book. Peter Hitchens once asked, If all the police officers in this country were suddenly abducted by aliens, how long would it take us to notice? (to which the vast majority of Britons would reply, Too long ). In A Brief History of Crime, Hitchens undertakes an excellent examination of the dismal state of the justice system in modern Britain, and how it ended up that way.

All right, I admit it, it’s not that brief. I didn’t have time to shorten it. But what follows is a condensed history of the argument about who should control Crimea, one which still rages and which (as usual) is not as simple as politicians like to claim it is. I’ll begin with a question

All right, I admit it, it’s not that brief. I’ll begin with a question. What do you reckon is the date of this Reuters News Agency dispatch? I’ve slightly doctored one or two things in it, but only to conceal the date. Elected officials in the Crimea voted on Monday to hold a referendum to resolve heated debates on the future status of the region.

A Brief History Of Crime (Hardback). Peter Hitchens (author) Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Crime is a political football - both left and right are terrified of seeming "soft" on the issue, but for all their efforts, or apparent efforts, crime rates continue to rise. Clearly something needs to be done. But what? Peter Hitchens argues that the time has come to re-examine the criminal justice system root and branch - to cope with rising levels of violent crime, and to restore public faith in society's ability to defend itself. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers.

Peter Hitchens argues that the time has come to re-examine the criminal justice system root and branch - to cope with rising levels of violent crime, and to restore public faith in society's ability to defend itself.

Peter Hitchens's rabid tirade, A Brief History of Crime, is both ill-argued and repellent. Unless we take appropriate coercive steps against the criminal minority forthwith, the rest of us are bound to lose further cherished freedoms shortly. This is, of course, an utterly extremist tract. Hitchens' idea of Britain is a bit like the vision John Major once mapped out in his old maids on bicycles, cricket and warm beer speech, except with ravening criminals lurking in the slips: yearning for a past which never existed, fear and loathing for a warped and monstrous present. Originally published in 2003, it was reissued in 2004 under the new title The Abolition of Liberty

A Brief History of Crime is the third book by author and journalist Peter Hitchens. Peter Jonathan Hitchens is an English conservative journalist and author. Hitchens writes for The Mail on Sunday and is a former foreign correspondent in Moscow and Washington. He has published eight books, including The Abolition of Britain, The Rage Against God, and The War We Never Fought.

A Brief History of Crime is the third book by conservative author and journalist Peter Hitchens. The book challenges a number of commonly held views about the causes of crime, criticising the opinion that crime is caused by poverty or other forms of social deprivation. It also charts the changes in policing from the 1960s to the present day, and examines and criticises the workings of the modern British prison system, including a chapter on the author's visit to Wormwood Scrubs.

Talk about A Brief History of Crime


Celace
This is most definitely not a "Brief History of Crime," or a "Brief History of the Criminal Common Law," or even "A Brief History of the Criminal System in England." I realized, too late, that this book's title was merely a clever play on Stephen Hawking's a Brief History of Time - a tagline, if you will. This book IS an interesting, though frequently frustrating, political essay about the current state of "law and order" in Great Britain.

A more descriptive title would be: "Liberal Politics and the Failure of Criminal Policy in Great Britain since 1960." I share the author's love of English tradition and the common law. I agree with him that positivism and hermeneutic of value-neutrality have a net-detrimental effect on the justice system, worldwide. He has some wonderful insights into both the causes of crime and the prospects for reform.

But the good points in this essay are undermined somewhat by the contradictions produced by the author's reactionary views. When he waves the banner of English liberty, I find myself cheering. But he then invariably changes gears, engaging in a lot of handwringing about licentious behavior, homosexuality, public drunkeness and pornography. On one page he sounds like John Stuart Mill; on the next he sounds like Lee Kuan Yew.

I understand that social capital is important - an undisciplined community cannot live free. But the author's idea of discipline is downright Prussian. Worse, it is unreflective. He rails against these "sinful" activities without justifying his moral judgments. These views are expressed in an strangely anachronistic voice; he sounds like Oliver Cromwell raging against the Pope. He comes across as a total prig, and as such, this book is not likely to attract a lot of converts to the cause of freedom.
Nilarius
Peter Hitchens is a noted political commentator. This book, a serious, detailed defence of our freedoms, is a worthy successor to his 1999 book, The Abolition of Britain, a passionate defence of Britain's integrity and sovereignty against the EU.

Most EU members lack habeas corpus, the presumption of innocence, single jeopardy, the right to silence and trial by jury. Now the EU wants to impose on us the European legal system (corpus juris), its mode of policing and its own prosecution service. Europol can already operate here, its officers immune from prosecution. Under the European arrest warrant, prosecuting authorities from any EU member country can order the arrest of a citizen of any other EU country. The Crown Prosecution Service is eliding into an EU prosecution service, an unaccountable servant of the state.

Hitchens makes an excellent case against ID cards, which would be compulsory and costly. He notes that the Australians and New Zealanders both defeated the proposal.

He points out that previous British governments wrongly copied US police methods unsuited to `this wholly different country'. He notes, "The Victorian network of police stations has been lopped as drastically as were the railways by the half-witted Beeching cuts of the sixties." Thatcher closed a thousand police stations, one in three, between 1992 and 2002, and centralised the police force. The public want bobbies on the beat: we want laws enforced, not more laws and rights. Macpherson aimed to institutionalise racism, demanding, "`Colour-blind' policing must be outlawed."

Hitchens urges that we build new mental hospitals, ending the `shameful Care in the Community programme' and getting the mentally ill out of prisons. He argues persuasively against decriminalising drugs.

This government overrules the rule of law, suspends habeas corpus and defends those who close down theatres. Its acts, particularly the Racism and Xenophobia Directive and a new offence of `religiously aggravated threatening behaviour', threaten our freedom of thought and speech: behaviour is either threatening or it isn't - the law should deal with actions, not with thoughts.

All these attacks on our freedoms are allowed, if not obligatory, under the EU Constitution.