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Download The Men from the Boys ePub

by William J. Mann

Download The Men from the Boys ePub
  • ISBN 0452278562
  • ISBN13 978-0452278561
  • Language English
  • Author William J. Mann
  • Publisher Plume (June 1, 1998)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats lrf mobi docx rtf
  • Category LGBT
  • Subcategory Literature and Fiction
  • Size ePub 1849 kb
  • Size Fb2 1647 kb
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 689

Jeff O’Brien - bright, good-looking, and inching dangerously past thirty, is caught between two generations, the Baby Boomers and Generation X. He’s been with his partner, Lloyd, for seven years now, but when Lloyd announces that there’s no passion left between them, Jeff is sent into something of an existential frenzy. Desperate not to end up alone, Jeff haunts the dance floor and roadside rest stops, finding both the sordid and the sublime in anonymous encounters. But it’s love he’s after, so ultimately it’s his bittersweet romance in Provincetown with Eduardo, twenty-two and a vision of gorgeous, wide-eyed youth, that lingers in his mind and seems to hold the answers he seeks. This is a story of a man coming to terms with the accelerating ambiguity of his world, where men die young but old age is actively devalued. It is the story of gay life today, the life being led by thousands of men trying desperately to keep up, and to discover if anything really unites gay men other than desire. It is the story of how the truths of gay life are handed down from gay generation to gay generation. It is the story of what separates the men from the boys.

After finishing William J. Mann's novel, The Men from the Boys, I couldn't tell if I liked it or not. Yes, there are certain passages that clearly show Mann is (or, at least can be) a talented writer. Yet, there was a great lack of any real depth with the characters and the plot.

After finishing William J. The story centers around Jeff and Lloyd, who find their relationship falling apart once Lloyd exclaims that there's no passion left. The book jumps back and forth in time, alternating between a past summer in Provincetown and the present in Boston

This classic novel by bestselling author William J. Mann features a gay man trying to come to terms with sex, friendship, aging, and falling-and staying-in loveThis stunning slice of gay life at the turn of the millennium introduces thirtysomething . .

This classic novel by bestselling author William J. Mann features a gay man trying to come to terms with sex, friendship, aging, and falling-and staying-in loveThis stunning slice of gay life at the turn of the millennium introduces thirtysomething Jeff O’Brien. After six years, his lover, Lloyd, has just announced that the passion between them has died. Terrified of ending up alone, Jeff turns his eye toward other men. But the anonymous, impersonal encounters leave him feeling sordid and used.

Mann's first novel, The Men From the Boys, was published by Dutton in 1997. He continued with a series of novels set in Provincetown, although he has also set his fiction in Palm Springs and Los Angeles. In addition, Mann has written the nonfiction books Wisecracker (1998), a biography of film star William Haines, for which he won the Lambda Literary Award, Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood (2001), and Edge of Midnight: The Life of John Schlesinger (2005).

Jeff O'Brien and his friends return in this sequel to The Men from the Boys, William J. Mann's critically acclaimed debut novel about gay love and friendship Where the Boys Are opens in Manhattan on New Year's Eve, 1999. With the world on the cusp of the new millennium, Jeff O'Brien and his ex-lover Lloyd Griffith are grieving the loss of their friend and mentor David Javitz to AIDS. Desperate to forget, Jeff has become a fixture on the dance floor, surrounding himself with ever-younger boy toys like Henry Weiner.

Lloyd’s cleaning up after dinner: takeout Chinese from Hong Lee’s to celebrate the homecoming. Javitz is staying with us for a few days, just to get his strength back. welcome when we came through the door, attacking his pointy cowboy boots as he walked into the living room. Glad to know some things never change, Javitz said. But it feels as if something has. I’ve got the oddest sensation something’s different. I asked Javitz, just a few moments before he lit up his cigarette and headed out to the deck, but he shook his.

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Электронная книга "The Men from the Boys: A Novel", William J. Mann

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It is the story of gay life today, the life being led by thousands of men trying desperately to keep up-and to discover if anything really unite. iction Romance. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

WILLIAM J. MANN is the author of Wisecracker: The Gay Hollywood of William Haines (Viking). Once, we were the boys of the moment, angry young men marching through the streets in black leather jackets covered with crack-and-peel slogans: Act Up! Fight Back! Get Used to It!

WILLIAM J. He writes for such publications as the Boston Phoenix, The Advocate, and Architectural Digest. His short fiction and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies, including Men on Men 6 (Plume). Once, we were the boys of the moment, angry young men marching through the streets in black leather jackets covered with crack-and-peel slogans: Act Up! Fight Back! Get Used to It!

After finishing William J. Mann's novel, The Men from the Boys, I couldn't tell if I liked it or no. The book jumps back and forth in time, alternating between a past summer in Provincetown and After finishing William J. Yet, there was a lack of any real depth with the characters and the plot.

Talk about The Men from the Boys


MisterMax
I read somewhere that gay men think about sex once every two minutes - or maybe it was twice in one minute. In any case, I wasn't surprised that Jeff was obsessed with sex, and I didn't think it made him a bad person. Some reviewers said he never grew up, or that he was too self-absorbed, or that he simply couldn't get his life act together. Well, maybe all those comments are true, but that doesn't make him especially unique. I've known quite a few people like that (hope I'm not one of them). Anyway I didn't think the book was unrealistic.

Other reviewers thought the book was boring, i.e., that it simply repeated all the gay stereotypes. Well, there's something to that comment, but it didn't stop me from reading or enjoying the book. We've got a lot of novels out there about P'town, the gay life style, problems of being gay, etc., and I wouldn't want to read one every week - as opposed to books, say, on World War II or U.S. politics - but it's good to get a
reminder of what things were like for gays in the 1990s. I'm gay and have quite a few gay friends, but basically exist in a heterosexual world. Even though none of my best friends died of AIDS, quite a few people I knew or knew of did, and there was a pall hanging over the whole era that never went away. So this book was a good reminder of what things were like then on the gay front, and how one could never really escape completely from thoughts about the AIDS plague.

One criterion I use in selecting what books to read is to notice if the sum total of Amazon reviews adds up to four stars or more. Below that, I seldom bother. This book averaged out to four stars, but I was surprised at how extreme the comments were. Some people absolutely loved the book, but a substantial number were highly negative. What does that mean? Well, I'm not sure, but my guess is that most of the reviewers are gay, and that they are divided into those who were out in the period under consideration (and thus might find the book repetitive and lacking in plot and action), and those who are younger (and thus freshly exposed to how things were in a previous millennium). Now and then, I get a reminder that AIDS is still with us, but it's not now a dark cloud dominating the current era.
Mozel
I don't know why I like this book. Maybe because it is about Provincetown, maybe because it is about summer, maybe both. I hate the main character Jeff he is what I hate most about some gay men, working out, getting tan have an attitude. He has a wonderful boyfriend. yet he's got to sleep around with several people, have an affiair with a young man fall in love with said young man well still with the lover I don't get it. Then, there is the exboyfriend who is still in the picture ( who stays friends with their exboyfriend?) who has AIDS not HIV -full blown AIDS and still goes to the dunes to have sex and does not tell the people he has sex with that he has it. Wow what kind of people are these guys? So I ask myslef why do I like this book? I guess because the writring is wonderful, Bill Mann (author) is a friendly, nice guy (met him quiet a few times) and the story is about my life. But I am nothing like these people who fear aging, a gray hair, a wrinkle. They go nuts. Shaving their chest to look younger. What nelly queens!!! I have never asked Bill if he liked these characters or not. I know I despise them. So, I ask myself why do I like these books? Shallow characters.Exboyfriend with AIDS that goes out having unporotcted sex? Two boyfriends sleeping around with other people? Open relationship? I don't know why...I just do.
Rageseeker
After finishing William J. Mann's novel, The Men from the Boys, I couldn't tell if I liked it or not. Yes, there are certain passages that clearly show Mann is (or, at least can be) a talented writer. Yet, there was a great lack of any real depth with the characters and the plot.

The story centers around Jeff and Lloyd, who find their relationship falling apart once Lloyd exclaims that there's no passion left. The book jumps back and forth in time, alternating between a past summer in Provincetown and the present in Boston. This structure, which showed what was happening for the main characters at two very different, yet equally important times of their lives, worked well and is quite creative.

Jeff and Lloyd enjoy and open relationship, which might turn some off automatically. For me, it wasn't so much that they had an open relationship that left a bad taste, but, at times, it seemed like the author was writing an essay on why open relationships are better than monogamy; or, it seemed like he was really reaching to defend the idea that monogamy doesn't work. I can understand his argument, yet, like other ideas presented in the book, it didn't work to enhance the plot all that much. Instead of reading a good piece of fiction, I felt as if I was reading strung together essays on the nature of gay culture and relationships at times. He (not so) cleverly hides these essay-like moments behind long conversations between Jeff, Lloyd, and their best friend, Javitz, an older, mentor-like figure.

Another problem is with the main character, Jeff. While he's not completely insufferable, he's not the most likeable character ever created and doesn't seem to show any growth by the end of the book. He gets obsessed with young, attractive guys and argues that he sometimes falls in love with them for only a night. But, he seems incapable of describing his strong feelings beyond long descriptions of their sculpted abs and pecs. Overall, he seems beyond superficial.

And yes, this youth and looks obsession in the gay community is something that exists and could be interesting to write about ... however, it doesn't seem like Mann scratches the surface enough on any of this. There's so much more to explore behind the why of all of this, yet Mann doesn't do that at all.

Throughout the book, Jeff comes off as pretty whiny and dim as to why his relationship isn't working. As Mann seems to make an argument for open relationships, his story points out how many problems it can open up. In other words, he seems to be making an argument for open relationships while unknowingly showing the obvious problems that can arise with such a situation. At numerous points while reading the book, I felt like hitting Jeff on the head and saying, "Duh! Dude, what do you expect?"

Parts of the book are pretty cliche as well. Some characters, like Javitz, could have been really interesting if explored further.

Overall, I wanted to really like this book but couldn't convince myself I did.