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Download Fix ePub

by Damian Thompson

Download Fix ePub
  • ISBN 0007436084
  • ISBN13 978-0007436088
  • Language English
  • Author Damian Thompson
  • Publisher Collins (May 1, 2012)
  • Pages 288
  • Formats azw lrf rtf lrf
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Behavioral Sciences
  • Size ePub 1221 kb
  • Size Fb2 1889 kb
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 730

Addictions to iphones, painkillers, cupcakes, alcohol and sex are taking over our lives. Our most casual daily habits can quickly become obsessions that move beyond our control. Damian Thompson, who has himself struggled with a range of addictions, argues that human desire is in the process of being reshaped. Shunning the concept of addiction as disease, he shows how manufacturers are producing substances like ipads, muffins and computer games that we learn to like too much and supplement tradition addictions to alcohol, drugs and gambling. He argues that addictive behaviour is becoming a substitute for family and work bonds that are being swept away by globalisation and urbanisation. This battle to control addiction will soon overshadow familiar ideological debates about how to run the economy, and as whole societies set about "fixing" themselves, the architecture of human relations will come under strain as never before. The Fix offers a truly frightening glimpse of the future and is essential reading for fans of Naomi Klein's 'No Logo', Oliver James's 'Affluenza' and Francis Wheen's 'How Mumbo-jumbo Conquered the World'.

Thompson's book is at once blackly funny, intellectually serious and compellingly readable. Damian Thompson is a recovering alcoholic who continues to wrestle with an addiction to collecting Classical CDs.

Thompson's book is at once blackly funny, intellectually serious and compellingly readable.

The fix. How addiction is invading our. Lives and taking over your world. 1 – cupcakes, iphones and vicodin. 2 – is addiction really a ‘Disease’? 3 – what the brain tells us (and what IT doesn’t).

Damian Thompson, who has himself struggled with a range of addictions, argues that human desire is in the process of being reshaped

Damian Thompson, who has himself struggled with a range of addictions, argues that human desire is in the process of being reshaped. Shunning the concept of addiction as disease, he shows how manuf Addictions to iphones, painkillers, cupcakes, alcohol and sex are taking over our lives. Our most casual daily habits can quickly become obsessions that move beyond our control. Damian Thompson, who has himself struggled with a range of addictions, argues that human desire is in the process of being reshaped. Shunning the concept of addiction as disease, he shows how manufacturers are producing substances like ipads, muffins and computer games that we learn to like too much and supplement tradition addictions to alcohol, drugs and gambling. He argues that addictive behaviour is becoming a substitute for family and work bonds that are being swept away by globalisation and urbanisation

The Fix - Damian Thompson. The Stop and Go imagery helps us understand the growing appeal of the fix. As technologies develop and converge, the speed of delivery increases.

The Fix - Damian Thompson. 1. Cupcakes, iphones and vicodin. The 21st-century cupcake is a thing of wonder: a modest base of sponge groaning under an indulgently thick layer of frosted sugar or buttercream. So does the speed of our expectations. We now live in a world filled with life-enhancing objects and substances that promise ever faster and more effective gratification. It’s as if everything that tumbles off a production line is stamped with the word Go.

Thompson was educated at Presentation College, Reading (later known as the Elvian School), and read history at Mansfield College, Oxford.

In the US, Vicodin falls into the Schedule III category, less tightly controlled than stronger opiate painkillers such as Oxycontin, classified as Schedule I.

In the US, Vicodin falls into the Schedule III category, less tightly controlled than stronger opiate painkillers such as Oxycontin, classified as Schedule II. You can phone in a prescription for Vicodin to a pharmacy; for Oxycontin, you have to hand over a physical script. So by the time the first House screenplays were being written in 2003, Vicodin was already as famous for its recreational buzz as for its painkilling properties. Using substances and manipulating situations to fix your mood isn’t new. It’s the pace, intensity, range and scale of this mood-fixing that is unprecedented, irrespective of whether it involves drugs, alcohol, food or sex.

Three books on modern cravings embrace drug memoir, neuroscience and society's moral slide, writes Nicholas Lezard. I had not expected much from Damian Thompson's book

Three books on modern cravings embrace drug memoir, neuroscience and society's moral slide, writes Nicholas Lezard. I had not expected much from Damian Thompson's book. He blogs for the Telegraph and the occasional obligatory leftie-baiting that such a job entails has the occasional added twist of a problematic relationship with established Christianity.

Damian Thompson (born 1962) is a British journalist, author and blogger. Thompson himself mainly blogs about religion. Thompson was educated at Presentation College, Reading, and read history at Mansfield College, Oxford University. He received his P. in the sociology of religion from the London School of Economics for a thesis on the management of apocalyptic belief in a London Pentecostal church. Thompson himself mainly blogs about religion Books.

But British journalist Damian Thompson backs it up. He speaks in a voice that’s deceptively casual, disclosing his own demons - from alcohol to zopiclone - throughout the book

But British journalist Damian Thompson backs it up. He speaks in a voice that’s deceptively casual, disclosing his own demons - from alcohol to zopiclone - throughout the book. After reading the first 50 pages, you may feel that his take on addiction is superficial and a bit self-centered. But by the end, after you’ve been pulled through a whirlwind of anecdotes, interviews and studies, he has built an argument with real force and substance

Talk about Fix


GawelleN
A look in the mirror, perhaps distorted, but the author asks us to think about how much we really exercise free will. I am reminded on a conversation in a Dorothy Sayers story where a titled gentleman is asked why he bothers with traditions, rules, and propriety when his station in life would allow him to do as he pleases. He responds that it is this precisely this privilege that prevents him from abusing it. It is a responsibility as much as a license. Rather unlike the self indulgent media and sport stars of today who observe no restraint once they earn the adulation of the public. Theirs is another type of addiction.
Abandoned Electrical
I agree with most of the points raised by the other five-star reviewers.

Thompson's definition of addiction covers a continuum from meth/heroin/coke to iPhones to porn to cupcakes and down to Angry Birds. He discusses both substance and "process" addictions (e.g., gambling or computer gaming).

While he benefited from Alcoholic's Anonymous, he emphatically rejects their contention that addiction is a disease.

Much is made of dopamine's role in addiction, vs. endorphin. Thompson distinguishes between dopamine ("wanting") and endorphin ("liking"). Modern society does much to "press our wanting buttons" while we may not find as much liking as we would want. Addiction replaces people in our lives.

Significant attention is given to use & abuse of prescription drugs, whether by legitimate prescriptions, internet "pharmacies," or street sources. ADD and ADHD are discussed.

Rather than speak of an addicted society, he considers our "addictive personalities." Many people choose to identify themselves by their addictions.

Thompson: "Fortunately powerful desire doesn't lobotomize us. In the final analysis, addiction is a disorder of choice, and we're not doomed to carry on making bad choices to the point of helplessness. The challenge is identifying those bad choices."

My take is that Thompson views addiction almost like the Buddhists view excessive attachment.

Easy to read, excellent end notes, no simple solutions.
Геракл
I bought this book because I have a habit.. an addiction if you will... to checking email, Facebook, and Twitter too many times a day on my iPhone and I wanted to do a little research into what qualifies as addiction. (Luckily, I haven't had problems of the drug and alcohol variety.)

This book makes a few controversial and thought-provoking points. First, addictions are essentially bad habits, not diseases. Second, these habits are powerful and often self-reinforcing. And third, people can quit their bad habits, but circumstances play a huge part. (After reading the book, I quickly moved my bad habit apps to harder-to-reach folders on my phone. Time will tell.)

This is not a self-help book. It's a thoughtful look at the whole topic of addiction (drugs, alcohol, Internet, porn, video games, gambling, eating) with a focus on what makes something addictive, how the brain reacts, and about how society may do ourselves a disservice by equating addiction with disease.

It's also very readable, well-written, and even funny. I read most of it on a flight from SFO to LHR, and I'm a fairly slow reader. Highly recommended.
Muniath
Damian Thompson talks about many forms of addiction and quite frankly it scares me in lots of ways - is it just that these things are so easy to share or find out about but I worry about our young people and their future with so much ease of access to whatever takes their fancy through the Internet. It might lack some scientific evidence in parts but the author is an alcoholic as well as drug user and what he says is really challenging my thoughts and ideas. I do believe that our students at school need to be taught to critically think about all information available. This is a book that should be read by many.
Friert
This is an excellent overview of modern-day addiction - from drugs and alcohol to cupcakes and smartphones. It was interesting to read a book about addiction written by an addict, that didn't come from an addiction as a disease standpoint. I've been collecting quotes from the book I think capture the issues we face as a distracted, numbed out society. Good stuff!
Hanad
A fascinating read that punches holes in the dike of all 12 step programs. A get reference for all who believe self-reliance is the path to self-improvement and personal fulfillment.
Zetadda
Got this book for a class. It was an interesting perspective, but the sources were primarily news channels. I prefer a more scientific approach to support ideas.
While I'm not an expert in addiction, it seems like Damian Thompson provides a good overview of various addictive, modern day habits. He takes issue with the current view of addiction as a disease, and he points to similarities in the underlying addictive mechanisms as evidence. While it's not meant as a guide for getting out of addiction, it helps the reader look at, reflect on addictions, and take responsibility for the addictive decisions one makes.