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Download Built by Animals: The Natural History of Animal Architecture ePub

by Mike Hansell

Download Built by Animals: The Natural History of Animal Architecture ePub
  • ISBN 0199205574
  • ISBN13 978-0199205578
  • Language English
  • Author Mike Hansell
  • Publisher Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 15, 2009)
  • Pages 268
  • Formats lrf lrf txt azw
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Biological Sciences
  • Size ePub 1555 kb
  • Size Fb2 1231 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 288

From termite mounds and caterpillar cocoons to the elaborate nests of social birds and the deadly traps of spiders, the constructions of the animal world can amaze and at times even rival our own feats of engineering. But how do creatures with such small brains build these complex structures? What drives them to do it? In this fascinating volume, Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build--whether homes, traps, or courtship displays--and reveals what science can tell us about this incredible behavior. We look at wasp's nests, leaf-cutting ants, caddis flies and amoebae, and even the extraordinary bower bird, who seduces his mate with a decorated pile of twigs, baubles, feathers, and berries. We discover how some animals produce their own building materials, such as the silk secreted by spiders to weave an array of different web and traps, or the glue some insects produce to hold their buildings together. And we learn how a vast colony of social insects can create nests which may penetrate up to twenty feet into the ground and house millions of individuals--all built by tiny-brained animals repeating many simple actions as they roam randomly around the structure. Hansell also sheds light on how animal buildings have evolved over time, how insect societies emerged, how animals can alter their wider habitat, and even whether some animals have an aesthetic sense. Built by Animals offers a colorful account of a facet of animal behavior that will delight anyone interested in the natural world.Now Available in Paperback

Hansell also sheds light on how animal buildings have evolved over time, how insect societies emerged, how .

Hansell also sheds light on how animal buildings have evolved over time, how insect societies emerged, how animals can alter their wider habitat, and even whether some animals have an aesthetic sense. Скачать (pdf, . 5 Mb) Читать.

Mike Hansell is Emeritus Professor of Animal Architecture at the University of Glasgow. Author of Animal Architecture and Bird Nests and Building Behavior, he is a leading authority on animal building. Start reading Built by Animals: The natural history of animal architecture on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

From termite mounds that in relative terms are three times as tall as a skyscraper, to the elaborate nests of social birds and the deadly traps of spiders, the constructions of the animal world can amaze and at times humble our own engineering and technology. But how do creatures with such small brains build these complex structures? What drives them to do it? Which skills are innate and which learned? Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build - whether homes, traps, or courtship displays - and reveals the biology behind their behaviour.

Built by Animals book. Hansell also sheds light on how animal buildings have evolved over time, how insect societies emerged, how animals can alter their wider habitat, and even whether some animals have an aesthetic sense. From termite mounds and caterpillar cocoons to the elaborate nests. Finally, he shows how animal structures may reveal clues to the origins of our own tool use and appreciation of beauty.

Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build - whether homes, traps, or courtship displays - and reveals the biology behind their behaviour

Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build - whether homes, traps, or courtship displays - and reveals the biology behind their behaviour. He shows how small-brained animals achieve complex feats in a small-brained way, by repeating many simple actions and using highly evolved self-secreted materials. On the other hand, the building feats or tool use of large-brained animals, such as humans or chimps, require significantly more complex and costly behaviour.

Электронная книга "Built by Animals: The natural history of animal architecture", Mike Hansell. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Built by Animals: The natural history of animal architecture" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Nature abounds with structures built by animals other than humans, or animal architecture, as it is commonly termed, such as termite mounds, wasp and beehives, burrow complexes of rodents, beaver dams.

Nature abounds with structures built by animals other than humans, or animal architecture, as it is commonly termed, such as termite mounds, wasp and beehives, burrow complexes of rodents, beaver dams, elaborate nests of birds, and webs of spiders. Often, these structures incorporate sophisticated features such as temperature regulation, traps, bait, ventilation, special-purpose chambers and many other features.

In this fascinating volume, Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build-whether homes, traps, or courtship displays-and reveals what science can tell us about this incredible behavior. We look at wasp's nests, leaf-cutting ants, caddis flies and amoebae, and even the extraordinary bower bird, who seduces his mate with a decorated pile of twigs, baubles, feathers, and berries. Oxford University Press, USA. Book Format.

Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build – whether homes, traps, or courtship displays – and reveals the biology behind their behaviour

Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build – whether homes, traps, or courtship displays – and reveals the biology behind their behaviour. But how do creatures with such small brains build these complex structures? What drives them to do it? Which skills are innate and which learned? Here, Mike Hansell looks at the extraordinary structures that animals build - whether homes, traps, or courtship displays - and reveals the biology behind their behaviour.

Talk about Built by Animals: The Natural History of Animal Architecture


Itiannta
Informative but could have been tightened up by half
Dark_Sun
Interesting book
Clodebd
Built by Animals

It's a captivating title and a captivating cover photo. And anyone who makes the effort to understand the natural world will come to this book with some appreciation of animal architecture, if not from personal observation, then from nature TV. Moreover author Mike Hansell's credentials are exactly those you would expect. So why is this book so unsatisfying? After all, the author treats us to some of the animal construction that we expect, caterpillar cocoons, beaver lodges and dams, ant tunnels, and mud dauber nests. And he introduces us to much that we do not expect, naked mole rats tunnels, hairy-nosed wombat warrens, European badger setts, "magnetic" termite mounds, and amoeba shells. And, although it doesn't relate to animal construction, Hansell also includes a very good chapter on tool use by animals. It also asks, in a chapter-long unanswered question, who makes the design decisions in a colony of hundreds or thousands of residents.

But the reader expects Professor Hansell to answer as well as ask the questions. Unfortunately the answers are all too infrequent. The treatment of the construction of the web of the orb web spider, Araneus diadematus is a rare exception. It is truly excellent, and very satisfying, but it appears to have been written by a different person (a graduate student, perhaps?). Overall the book fails for three reasons. The first is Hansell's painfully self-conscious writing style. We are not reading about animal architecture, we are reading about Hansell writing about animal architecture. We even catch him writing to himself, as in "but let me not get carried away..." The second reason is the pointless digression, as when he describes the nerve centers for avian vocalization. Ultimately, though, the book fails because it does not explain what we wanted explained. How do the filter nets of the Oikopleura dioica get built? "Well, they just appear." How do the stones comprising the shell of the Difflugia coronata amoeba get put in place by a one celled organism which doesn't possess a central nervous system? "...the stones arrange themselves." Professor Hansell, those stones are inorganic; they are inanimate; they do not simply arrange themselves. Perhaps a hundred times throughout the book Hansell simply states, "we really do not know," or that something happens "in a manner not yet studied."

This book addresses a most fascinating topic, but the enthusiastic naturalist will be disappointed that it doesn't live up to its billing.
Miromice
Built by Animals: The Natural History of Animal Architecture

Built By Animals is a book in which different patterns in Behavior and architecture are shown with the use of examples from the vast diversity of ecosystems in the planet, to explain to an extent the behavior and possible thought processes behind these structures and analyzing what this can tell us about evolution, intelligence, and a view of what defines art. The audience is able to engage and learn about the many different techniques that animals use in architecture which includes nesting, and living conditions, mating, predation even social interaction between species. This book provides a pleasant journey through the world.
Author Mike Hansell is currently an Emeritus Professor in the University of Glascow. He has also written many research papers on animal architecture as well as the different characteristics of nesting for many bird species. And his deep interest in the intricate behavior behind this architecture is shown deeply throughout the book, being written for all audiences, presents to be somewhat challenging, yet entertaining and fun for all readers.
The book is divided by eight chapters, each of them covering a different aspect of the behavior and the different examples of animal architecture in the world. Chapter one focuses on a brief introduction to the category of animals known as "builders" this chapter serves as the first encounter of the animal kingdom in which we can first appreciate the many different techniques or approaches to building a shelter. Beavers and their intricate designs to build dams with the use of wood and branches and twigs, a general overview of the techniques that birds employ when it comes to building nests or even burrowing, we are shown a closer look to the complexity behind ant colonies and the way they are formed and set up to house and protect the colony from predators.
Chapter two titled "Builders change the world takes a closer look at the effects that many structures have on the ecosystem. This chapter takes a look at humanity's advances in architecture and presents the idea that rather than promote biodiversity, humanity's influence is more shown in destruction of ecosystems, such as the termite colonies, which not only provide protection for the termite but also provide mutual benefits for other species like birds. It also takes a look at the fossilized records of these colonies, showing that ants and termites have been present for quite a while and have been able to coexist in the environment rather than harming it.
"You don't need Brains to be a Builder" is the title for chapter three. In this chapter, Hansell brings different examples of individuals that manage to be builders but are not necessarily categorized as being the most outstanding architects, the amoeba, and it's ability to make a protective shell is shown in this chapter as well as the caterpillar and his ability to make the cocoon, honeybees and their wax cells, giving the audience the idea that even simple minds can create complex architecture when they have different materials at their disposal, thus showing that perhaps a brain is not quite required to make architecture for protection.
Chapter four "Who's in Charge" provides a comparison of the Human architecture with the termite architecture in terms of capacity, showing that Human architecture pales in comparison to the capacity that termite architecture provides for their inhabitants. It also talked about the termites' ability and sense of direction to navigate through the many different tunnels in the colony.
Chapter five "From One nest to Another" goes into detail between the relationship between parent and offspring, dealing with things like group nesting to provide better protection for the offspring as well as the different aspects of it from evolutionary history, on how it has changed, or improved over the years, to evolutionary mechanism, on how it works and what does it focus on diversity in nesting, going from the different types of nests, like building nests on cliffs, to burrowing using mud. This chapter also mentions Darwin and Mendel and their different findings on evolution and heritability.
Chapter six "two routes lead to trap building" focuses on the different ways in which species create traps in order to catch prey, this chapter provided different examples going from humans, to the ant lion and worm lion using trapdoors, to the red back spider that carried a web and walked around trapping insects. This chapter also presents the question whether a big brain is not required for this type of behavior, due to the majority of this individuals being invertebrates versus the humans being the only vertebrates
Chapter seven focused on the different aspects of tool making and whether it can be a reflection of intelligence or pure instinct. Focusing from individuals like the chimpanzee using tools in lab environments as well as in the wild, to crows who make tools to catch some prey. It also focused on the Australopithecus and it's ability on tool making, which could've had an impact in evolution as the "smart" ones mated causing a larger brain to develop over time.
Chapter eight "Beautiful Bowers" focused on the aspect of mating in species, such as the Bowerbird and its intricate behavior of creating a colorful structure to better attract a female as well as focusing on the perspective of art that is given in nature itself, from the web designing of a spider to the Bower making to attract a mate and the social interactions that this causes within species.
I found this book to be fascinating and incredibly engaging for the reader, because it presents itself in a different manner than most books, giving the impression that a conversation is happening involving the reader directly with the author. An excellent read for anyone interested in animal behavior, and the many reflections within the book provide detailed descriptions for the reader to visualize. The book centers on the equilibrium that each species brings to an ecosystem, what roles these organisms take on and how do they influence themselves and others. The book is expertly written in a way that it will keep the reader interested and motivated to read more while providing and teaching new information in such a manner that it does not seem like a lecture. Definitely something worth reading
The book divides itself in these chapters in order to give a broad perspective on how vast and incredible are the mechanisms of nature, showing from the start animals such as the beaver who are builders on an ecosystem to comparing and contrasting humanities' own architectural achievements to those of the termites and ants, showing how our own achievements fall short when comparing it to the wonders of nature, but simultaneously Hansell shows us the magnificence of these organisms in assembling their homes. From evolution of species, adaptations to the environments, to different behaviors that influence a species' interaction within an ecosystem, this book gives us an objective tour through the many wonders that animals achieve and sometimes humanity fails to recognize.