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Download Peterson First Guides Birds ePub

by Roger Tory Peterson

Download Peterson First Guides  Birds ePub
  • ISBN 0395406846
  • ISBN13 978-0395406847
  • Language English
  • Author Roger Tory Peterson
  • Publisher Houghton Mifflin Co (April 1, 1986)
  • Pages 128
  • Formats mobi txt rtf mbr
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Biological Sciences
  • Size ePub 1695 kb
  • Size Fb2 1213 kb
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 558

This abridgment focuses on the North American birds most likely to be seen and features an informative introduction, and illustrated descriptions

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation, as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

This guide is best suited to the new bird watcher. You don't have to have a vast knowledge of birds or their proper names to use this book. Match the picture to the bird you're looking at and viola! You now know what animal you have been staring at for, well, however long you were in the dark.

Roger Tory Peterson (August 28, 1908 – July 28, 1996) was an American naturalist, ornithologist, illustrator and educator, held to be one of the founding inspirations for the 20th-century environmental movement. Peterson was born in Jamestown, New York, August 28, 1908. His father, Charles Peterson, was an immigrant from Sweden, coming to America as an infant. At the age of ten, C. Peterson lost his father to appendicitis, and he was sent off to work in the mills.

A Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern and Central North America, A Field Guide to Western Birds . Peterson Field Guides Series. 54 primary works, 55 total works. The first comprehensive field guide to freshwate. ore.

A Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern and Central North America, A Field Guide to Western Birds: A Completely New Guide to Field Marks of All Species F. . Book 1. A Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern and Central North America. by Roger Tory Peterson.

Roger Tory Peterson was only 25 years old when he published his Field Guide to the Birds. Although he was not the first to publish a field guide, his clear illustrations of key features revolutionized birding and influenced at least 3 generations of birding.

ROGER TORY PETERSON, one of the world's greatest naturalists .

ROGER TORY PETERSON, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. I also set out Peterson's two guides side by side as I went though them (the other being the full guide: "Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America"). Compare page numbers: 128 in First Guide to 532 in the complete guide .

The Peterson Field Guides (PFG) are a popular and influential series of American field guides intended to assist the layman in identification of birds, plants, insects and other natural phenomena. His inaugural volume was the classic 1934 book A Field Guide to the Birds, published (as were all subsequent volumes) by the Houghton Mifflin Company.

A very comprehensive ID guide to the birds of North America that was beautifully produced

A very comprehensive ID guide to the birds of North America that was beautifully produced. by GrrlScientist for ScienceBlogs Scientist.

Peterson, Roger Tory, date Peterson First guide to birds of North America. Birds first saw the light of day. This book was designed so that live birds could be readily identified at a distance by their "field marks" without resorting to the bird-in-hand characters that the early collectors relied upon. During the half century since my guide appeared the binocular has replaced the shotgun. Earlier handbooks were too complex.

Talk about Peterson First Guides Birds


Tejar
Being an experienced birder, I purchased a class set of this guide to give to each of my students to help foster their appreciation of birds. My students, all being beginners, found the guide easy to use. On our walks and classroom studies we focused on all of the common birds this past year and all of the birds they were looking for/found were within this guide. I highly recommend this guide for beginners, especially if they have a larger field guide like a Sibley's or a full version of Peterson's at home or in the car to back this guide up with.
Saberdragon
Are you thinking of birding? Don't know where to begin? If you're reading this, you have found exactly what you need to begin: "Peterson First Guide to Birds of North America (Peterson First Guides)".

Why is that so? I followed Peterson's advice: I familiarized myself with the guide. I also set out Peterson's two guides side by side as I went though them (the other being the full guide: "Peterson Field Guide to Birds of North America"). Compare page numbers: 128 in First Guide to 532 in the complete guide. And sizes: 7 1/4 x 4 for First Guide to 9 1/4 x 6 for the full guide.

The next question would be: If the full guide is longer and bigger, why not use it? Answer: More and bigger means a lot more!! A beginner needs the basics to begin birding. My gosh, but the amount of information about birds is almost overwhelming. Peterson's point is to start at the beginning then progress. First Guide begins with the most easily recognizable birds, plus providing the basics in identifying those birds. A few birds in listed in your journal will boost your self-confidence and knowledge that you can, indeed, become a birder.
Here is a list of some of the basics Peterson advises the neophyte to look for:

1. Any basic identification guide begins with marked points. To understand those terms, the birder needs to know the parts of a bird!
2. Use the eight visual categories in which to place the bird in question
3. Size
4. Wing patterns
5. Does it wade?
6. How does it fly?
7. Shape of the wings?
8. Body shape?
9. Tail shape?
10. Bill shape?
11. Does it climb trees?
12. Tail patterns?
13. Wing bars?
14. Eye rings or stripes?
15. Flight pattern?

No, I didn't either (didn't know there are this MANY different things to look for concerning each and every bird!) Again, this is a reason why one must have a guide, so essential in the beginning as a reference point!

Using the list I was able to verify the bird that flies through my neighborhood every January, landing in my huge cypress tree just inside the bayou which runs along the back end of my property. Cormorants. Did I say one? Nay, 15-20 of these huge black birds that make this awful croaking sound while holding out their wings to dry. The first winter I was in this house they awoke me early one Sunday morning croaking and holding out those awesome wings. I thought I was in a horror movie.

My brother immediately identified them for me as cormorants. Having never seen such a bird, I demanded to know how he knew. He fishes--all year! Cormorants live and hunt on and by bodies of water. They are common in this area (Northwest Louisiana) during winter as they migrate through. He didn't know how he knew, but I learned what I wrote just last night when I looked up Cormorants. I can also identify which cormorant--the Double-Crested Cormorant because he is all black. The bayou on which I live is inland.

However, with Peterson's First Guide I can add some information. They hold out their wings to dry. There are six species of cormorants in North America. If one is sighted on an inland lake, it is surely a Double-Crested, but on major bodies of water, check a guide to learn which of the six he represents.

I used "he" in the last paragraph. A slightly amusing statment from Peterson refers to females. As a beginning birder, don't try to identify a female as her markings are designed for camouflage. Instead, check out the company she keeps! (A little Peterson bit of humor referring to male colorations as the identifying factors for a species.)

Ready to go birding? Get your binoculars, a journal and pen to record your sightings, a camera, a bottle of water. Next put on good shoes, put your First Guide in your pocket, and take that first step on your first discovery trip in birding! That's a lot of firsts, but you'll think them worth it at the end.
Jorad
A friend gave me this book many years ago when I put up my first birdfeeder... I have loved it ever since... I have friends that want to start watching and feeding the birds and I have not found any book that is as simple and easy to read... So that's why when I found I could still get this book I ordered more for them... Mine is really worn and corners bent down and still use it all the time... Thank you for this wonderful book and anyone interested in wanting to know about your birds flying around your home, this is the book for you...
Phobism
I like Peterson guides but this is missing a lot of common species. Good for the price for absolute novices but they’re going to be scratching their heads when they’re trying to find something that isn’t in there.
Sat
I love Peterson Guides. I wouldn't buy anything else. We recently moved to West Virginia from Michigan and the place we're staying has bird feeders and lots of birds. We wanted to identify the species and this book does a great job of that.

It's small enough to fit into my camera bag without adding any weight or taking up too much space.

This is an abbreviated edition... this does not come close to having every bird you could run into, but it has a good variety of common species with pictures of both male and female as well as a little information about each species. I am pleased.
SmEsH
Such nice pictures/drawings. It is great for the kids, looking up different birds around here. Thanks!
Samardenob
The full Peterson guide is the standard by which others are judged, but for anyone who is not on a quest to see every bird in North America this book will do just fine. It is the same in almost every way (pictures, descriptions), except it is narrowed down to the birds you will most likely see (and several you'd be lucky to). That makes it easy to use and enjoy....plus it fits in your pocket so easily as it's about the thickness of 5 quarters and narrow from spine to front. I use it in my local wildlife classes and I would recommend this to any beginning birder, outdoor hobbyist, or feeder fan.
Requires a CD Player for use.