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Download Man's Place in Nature (Dover Books on Biology) ePub

by Thomas H. Huxley

Download Man's Place in Nature (Dover Books on Biology) ePub
  • ISBN 0486432734
  • ISBN13 978-0486432731
  • Language English
  • Author Thomas H. Huxley
  • Publisher Dover Publications (October 22, 2003)
  • Pages 192
  • Formats lrf azw lrf doc
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Biological Sciences
  • Size ePub 1146 kb
  • Size Fb2 1606 kb
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 201

Known as "Darwin's Bulldog" for his impassioned defense of evolutionary theory, Thomas Huxley published this, his most famous book, just a few years after Darwin's The Origin of the Species. Unlike Origin, this book focuses on human ancestry and offers a concise, nontechnical survey of the state of mid-nineteenth-century knowledge about primate and human paleontology and ethology.

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Books related to Man's Place in Nature. The Descent of Man. Charles Darwin. Complete Collection of Charles Darwin.

Man's Place in Nature - Thomas H. Huxley. Dover books on biology, psychology and medicine. INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, Claude Bernard. The author’s Preface comes from Volume VII of his 1894 Collected Essays. Huxley, Thomas Henry, 1825–-1895. Man’s place in nature, Thomas H.

His most famous book, Man's Place in Nature, published only five years after Darwin's The Origin of Species, offers .

As compelling a piece of analysis now as it was 140 years ago, Man's Place in Nature is a must for every science lover's library.

Huxley's book Man's Place in Nature, published in 1873, added an anthropological perspective to. .On the topic of biology he wrote both from the scientific view and to popularize the subject.

Huxley's book Man's Place in Nature, published in 1873, added an anthropological perspective to Darwin's theory; in fact, this book was the first to advocate the idea that anthropoid apes are the closest relatives to humans. Huxley's other scientific interests included comparative anatomy and paleontology. His writings were extensive. Huxley's other books were on education, philosophy, ethics, and theology.

by. Huxley, Thomas Henry, 1825-1895. On the relations of man to the lower animals. On some fossil remains of ma. IV. On the methods and results of ethnology (1865)- V. On some fixed points in British ethnology (187l)-VI. On the Aryan question (1890).

Man's Place in Nature. Known as "Darwin's Bulldog" for his impassioned defense of evolutionary theory, Huxley published this, his most famous book, just a few years after Darwin's The Origin of Species

Man's Place in Nature. Known as "Darwin's Bulldog" for his impassioned defense of evolutionary theory, Huxley published this, his most famous book, just a few years after Darwin's The Origin of Species. Unlike Origin, this book focuses on human ancestry and offers a concise, nontechnical survey of mid-19th-century knowledge about primate and human paleontology and ethology. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

To do justice to Mr. Bagehot's fertile book, would require a long article.

Стр. 131 - Nay more, thoughtful men, once escaped from the blinding influences of traditional prejudice, will find in the lowly stock whence Man has sprung, the best evidence of the splendour of his capacities; and will discern in his long progress through the Past, a reasonable ground of faith in his attainment of a nobler Future. To do justice to Mr.

Book theme: Evolution. Author: Thomas H Huxley. Thomas H. Huxley was born in Ealing, near London, in 1825. A stint as an assistant surgeon aboard the . Street Date: October 2, 2001. Stephen Jay Gould is the Alexander Agassiz professor of zoology and professor of geology at Harvard and the Vincent Astor visiting professor of biology at New York University.

Talk about Man's Place in Nature (Dover Books on Biology)


Mariwyn
This book, written in 1965, is still a fine introduction to the deserts of Southern California. It is not a textbook and not the end-all of desert books, but it is a concise, easy to read introduction to the subject. Jaeger was an excellent naturalist and his love of the subject shows in the writing.

If you are interested in this part of the country, just curious, or need a starting place for a class or research, this is your book.
Lightwind
This is a fairly slim book, easy to read. Illustrations are black and white line drawings. This is not an exhaustive natural history guide of the California deserts. You might still want to pick up some other books with color photos for plant identification and such. But this book will still give you some insights on the desert not available elsewhere.
Rolorel
Great description of the item and great price.
Liarienen
Came very quickly, book just as described!
Rleillin
Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895) was an English biologist, often called "Darwin's Bulldog" because of his spirited advocacy of Darwin's theory of evolution. This 1863 book proposed the extension of evolutionary theory to humans, years before Darwin's The Works of Charles Darwin: The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, Volume 22 Part 2 was written in 1871. The book began as an extension of public lectures that Huxley gave.

His argumentation is by analogy: "There is not much apparent resemblance between a barn-door Fowl and the Dog who protects the farm-yard. Nevertheless the student of development finds, not only that the chick commences its existence as an egg, primarily identical in all essential respects with that of the Dog, but that the yelk of this egg undergoes division---that the primitive groove arises, and that the contiguous parts of the germ are fashioned, by precisely similar methods, into a young chick, which at one stage of its existence, is so like the nascent Dog, that ordinary inspection would hardly distinguish the two."

He admits the gap between man and modern apes (the African hominids had not been discovered when this book was written, of course). Nevertheless, "Without question, the mode of origin and the early stages of the development of man are identical with those of the animals immediately below him in the scale---without a doubt, in these respects, he is far nearer the Apes, than the Apes are to the Dog," and "in whatever proportion of its limbs the Gorilla differs from Man, the other Apes depart still more widely from the Gorilla," and as "greatly as the dentition of the highest Ape differs from that of Man, it differs far more widely from that of the lower and lowest Apes."

In a sense, this is his major argument, and it is repeated throughout the book: "there is no existing link between Man and the Gorilla, but do not forget that there is a no less sharp line of demarcation, a no less complete absence of any transitional form, between the Gorilla and the Orang, or the Orang and the Gibbon."

This brief but important work is essential reading for anyone interested in the development of evolutionary theory.
HyderCraft
Huxley surely was the best evolution defender of his time, even superior to Darwin and Wallace at this feat. This book is a classic to man's evolution literature and should be read by anyone interested in the early foundations of evolution. This were the kind of lectures and essays that destroy competing arguments from other theories. Something that strikes me is how updated this still is (well considering the time that has passed), and how strong are Huxley's arguments and so well founded. Huxley uses various techniques to make his point, he uses a lot of the new branch of science "comparative anatomy", and does so like an expert. Simply a delightful reading, a time travel to the origins of the evolution theory.
Banal
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