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Download The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future ePub

by Laurence C. Smith

Download The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future ePub
  • ISBN 0452297478
  • ISBN13 978-0452297470
  • Language English
  • Author Laurence C. Smith
  • Publisher Plume; Reprint edition (October 25, 2011)
  • Pages 352
  • Formats rtf lit azw lrf
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Earth Sciences
  • Size ePub 1360 kb
  • Size Fb2 1573 kb
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 916

“A compelling portrait of the future and vividly relates the big challenges facing the world now.”—Jared Diamond, New York Times bestselling author of Collapse and Guns, Germs, and SteelThe world's population is exploding, wild species are vanishing, and our environment is degrading. What kind of world are we leaving for our children and grandchildren? Just who will flourish—and who will fail—in our evolving world?Combining the lessons of geography and history with state-of-the-art model projections and analytical data, Guggenheim fellow Laurence C. Smith predicts how the eight nations of the Arctic Rim (including the United States) will become increasingly powerful while the nations around the equator struggle for survival. Like Bjorn Lomborg's The Skeptical Environmentalist, The World in 2050 is as credible as it is controversial, projecting the looming benefits as well as the problems of climate change.

This is a book about our future. To imagine the world in 2050, we must closely study what is happening today, and why.

This is a book about our future.

is a lively and impressive book, among the first in what promises to be an important publishing . This would be more aptly titled "The North in 2050," as the northern states such as the NORC countries are the primary focus of the book and his predictions

is a lively and impressive book, among the first in what promises to be an important publishing category, the explication of how the human landscape will be altered by artificially triggered climate change. This would be more aptly titled "The North in 2050," as the northern states such as the NORC countries are the primary focus of the book and his predictions. He sets up global forces such as demography, climate change, resources, and globalization (the push) and combines them with what is happening in the north (the pull) to predict how we will transition north.

How will civilization change over the next 40 years if humanity balloons to nine billion . I recommend this book to anyone interested in the future, the north, or just for a good academic read about where our world could be headed.

How will civilization change over the next 40 years if humanity balloons to nine billion, sea level rises by a foot and atmospheric temperature by several degrees, and globalization continues apace? From those assumptions, Smith, a university-employed geophysicist, posits answers with a focus on the Arctic Ocean and its coastline.

All rights reserved What will our world look like in 2050? Our distribution of people and power? The state of the natural world? Which countries will lead, and which ones suffer? Where do yo. .

What will our world look like in 2050? Our distribution of people and power? The state of the natural world? Which countries will lead, and which ones suffer? Where do you think you’ll be in 2050? The answers to these questions, at least in this book, derive from a core argument: The northern quarter of our planet’s latitudes will undergo tremendous transformation over the course of this century, making them a place of increased human activity, higher strategic value, and greater economic importance than today.

Dr. Smith Goes to Washington.

Надеемся, Вы провели время с удовольствием! Поделитесь, пожалуйста, своими впечатлениями: Оставить отзыв. Dr. 32. The Siberian Curse.

FromHow will civilization change over the next 40 years if humanity balloons to nine billion, sea level rises by a foot and atmospheric temperature by several degrees, and globalization continues apace?

FromHow will civilization change over the next 40 years if humanity balloons to nine billion, sea level rises by a foot and atmospheric temperature by several degrees, and globalization continues apace? From those assumptions, Smith, a university-employed geophysicist, posits answers with a focus on the Arctic Ocean and its coastline. Familiar with the Far North through scientific field trips, Smith embeds personal observations into his predictions about the effects of boreal warming.

Los Angeles Times, November 19, 2008. 2 Personal communication with Marsha Branigan, Manager, Wildlife Management Environment and Natural Resources, Inuvik, NWT, December 4, 2007. Grizzly, Half Polar Bear,. Grizzly, Half Polar Bear, MSNBC World Environment, May 11, 2006. 4 Of particular relevance to the pizzly story is the recent discovery that transient grizzly bears are now regular visitors to Canada’s Arctic Archipelago, and a small but viable population may be establishing itself in or around Melville Island.

Author: Laurence Smith.

The World in 2050 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. A vivid forecast of our planet in the year 2050 by a rising star.

Talk about The World in 2050: Four Forces Shaping Civilization's Northern Future


Cordanara
I'll start off with the positives right up front, because I think the author, Laurence C Smith, deserves it. He has written a wonderful book, chock full of great information and insights, about a hugely complicated subject and with a difficult task and did an amazing job breaking it down and into a useful form. I love the fact that he is very measured in his predictions even though I'm sure if you're looking for a pie in the sky, gee-whiz, futurist vision, you'll be disappointed. He doesn't rely on or try to predict the black swans or easy answers to arrive at his main predictions. He does look at some of the larger out-of-tolerance scenarios at the end though which is refreshing and shows the scope of his thinking. Some books I've read such as the Next 100 Years try to do way too much and try to be too cool, thus eliminating their usefulness. Mr Smith is very realistic in his approach and what he bases his predictions on. The world doesn't make such leaps as our imagination can handle like flying cars and crazy technology but moves at a logical pace; when disruptive tech does arrive, the world and society are a very large ship to turn. Mr Smith realizes this. I learned a lot from what he sees in demography and as other reviewers have noted, things like grain as water transfer and the relationship of water to, well, everything. I also love how he is a true scientist and can be critical of his own results and conclusions and is a big factor when I read things like this.

Now here is the negative part, though negative is too strong of a word. This would be more aptly titled "The North in 2050," as the northern states such as the NORC countries are the primary focus of the book and his predictions. He sets up global forces such as demography, climate change, resources, and globalization (the push) and combines them with what is happening in the north (the pull) to predict how we will transition north. I believe all his predictions are fairly accurate as I mention above and I strongly believe this kind of specialization is needed in predictions... now it just needs to be combined with the rest of the world. I can completely understand why he takes this tack, as the Northern latitudes are his academic baby, so it is what he sees in the world and sees it as the most important. Luckily, his insight and passion (combined with his wit and writing style) add greatly to our knowledge and understanding. It just means that the book doesn't accomplish the breadth it advertises though it benefits from its depth.

Overall, you WILL learn something (or really a lot of something) from this book and appreciate the work he has put in. It adds to the discussion in a realistic and logical manner and breaks down a complicated subject. It will open your eyes to the north and get you thinking. I recommend this book to anyone interested in the future, the north, or just for a good academic read about where our world could be headed. Well done Mr. Smith!
Whitecaster
I found this book excellent. I teach Globalization to M.A. students and I plan to use selected portions of this book in my future Globalization courses as a student reading and discussion assignment. The book is very useful to help place Globalization in perspective also in the context of other major developments and global forces since -as one of the other reviews also indicates - it "identifies four global forces likely to determine our future: human population growth and migration; growing demand for control over such natural resource "services" as photosynthesis and bee pollination; globalization; and climate change" In a university course on Globalization one typically (or at least often) tries to cover the various "dimensions of globalization" placing more or less emphasis on each one, depending on the audience and the purpose of the course. Namely, one tries to examine the political, economic, social, cultural, ideological, environmental and institutional dimensions of globalization and their various sub-variables, as these manifest themselves or as they emerge and develop further in various "places and levels" on our globe at various times. One such "place or level" is the Arctic North. In a course one can of course also "cover" the other main "global forces" above (other than globalization, and namely demographics, natural resource consumption, and climate change in the context of covering the "environmental dimension of globalization" ) But the book provides an alternative treatment which also does not treat globalization necessarily as a given or as necessarily continuing in the same form or to the same extent as it is occurring today. In any case in a university learning setting it is often just as important to stimulate students' critical thinking and their capacities to analyze, synthesize and examine using multi-disciplinary lenses, rather than providing any final analysis or definitive answers. One of these disciplinary lenses which often is neglected by non-geographers is that of the discipline of geography which can contribute a great deal to our understanding. (Geography and past History are two aspects of present reality which are relatively speaking constant and unchangeable though of course they can be interpreted in various ways and as such can also help us in trying to understand possible likely futures) And the book is certainly useful in providing alternative future scenarios and helping the reader consider how or why they may or may not come about (or their relative probabilities) and what and who could or could not do something about them. I also thoroughly enjoyed reading the book because it also tells a personal story and some of the adventures of the author in researching and writing the book and his various travels to areas of the North which I think are all extremely interesting and which most of us typically know very little about.