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Download ggplot2: Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis (Use R!) ePub

by Hadley Wickham

Download ggplot2: Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis (Use R!) ePub
  • ISBN 0387981403
  • ISBN13 978-0387981406
  • Language English
  • Author Hadley Wickham
  • Publisher Springer; 1st ed. 2009. Corr. 3rd printing 2010 edition (February 22, 2010)
  • Pages 213
  • Formats mbr txt lrf lit
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Mathematics
  • Size ePub 1831 kb
  • Size Fb2 1343 kb
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 410

Provides both rich theory and powerful applications

Figures are accompanied by code required to produce them

Full color figures


ggplot2: Elegant Graphics. has been added to your Cart. Hadley Wickham is an Assistant Professor of Statistics at Rice University, and is interested in developing computational and cognitive tools for making data preparation, visualization, and analysis easier

ggplot2: Elegant Graphics. Hadley Wickham is an Assistant Professor of Statistics at Rice University, and is interested in developing computational and cognitive tools for making data preparation, visualization, and analysis easier. He has developed 15 R packages and in 2006 he won the John Chambers Award for Statistical Computing for his work on the ggplot and reshape R packages.

Teaches how to create graphics in R using ggplot. Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis. Discusses the theoretical framework that underlies ggplot. Show all. Table of contents (10 chapters).

This is code and text behind the ggplot2: elegant graphics for data analysis book. In RStudio, press Cmd/Ctrl + Shift + B. Or run: bookdown::render book("index.

Master ggplot2 and the rich grammar that underlies i. 2 Getting started with ggplot2.

UseR ! Hadley Wickham. Moore: Applied Survival Analysis Using R Luke: A User’s Guide to Network Analysis in R Monogan: Political Analysis Using R Cano/M

UseR ! Hadley Wickham.

This book describes ggplot2, a new data visualization package for R that uses the insights from Leland Wilkison's Grammar of Graphics to create a powerful and flexible system for creating data graphics. With ggplot2, it's easy to: produce handsome, publication-quality plots, with automatic legends created from the plot specification.

Hadley Wickham is an Assistant Professor and the Dobelman FamilyJunior Chair in Statistics at Rice University

1 Welcome to ggplot2 ggplot2 is an R package for producing statistical, or data, graphics, but it is unlike most other graphics packages because it has a deep underlying grammar. This grammar, based on the Grammar of Graphics (Wilkinson, 2005), is composed of a set of independent components that can be composed in many di?erent ways. Hadley Wickham is an Assistant Professor and the Dobelman FamilyJunior Chair in Statistics at Rice University.

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If you use R and ggplot, this is the book to read to understand the principles behind ggplot so that you can fluently construct your own never-before-seen graphs by composing the library features.

Sep 08, 2009 Mark rated it it was ok. Shelves: statistics-etc, computer-science. I only include this to compete with Al. The book is just ok, but ggplot2 is very sweet. If you use R and ggplot, this is the book to read to understand the principles behind ggplot so that you can fluently construct your own never-before-seen graphs by composing the library features. You'll also learn how to clean up all the labels and formatting so that your graphs look presentable. I recommend it for anyone who works in R and shows their graphs to others.

Talk about ggplot2: Elegant Graphics for Data Analysis (Use R!)


Yllk
ggplot2 is a terrific package and you ought to learn it. Especially if you have no prior experience with R graphics packages - learn this extremely useful and general one first! You're then likely not to need others.

However it must be said that this text is starting to cry out for a new edition. Many - perhaps 30% - of the code examples no longer produce the output seen on the page. Some require detective work to find missing packages a beginning user won't likely have installed. And quite a few simply do not function at all.

Frustratingly, the associated book website with example code has also not been updated. And if anyone has complied in one place functioning rewrites of the book's non-working examples, I haven't managed to find it. Readers must frequently either decide "I won't use that anyway" or turn to google for help.

Update: I have now also purchased Winston Chang's "R Graphics Cookbook," which Amazon is probably advertising to you somewhere on this page. It's a ggplot2 book, essentially, with a bit of stuff from other packages thrown in at the end. It is much more up-to-date than Wickham's book and better organized to serve as a reference, so it has become my go-to. There is a reason to buy both books - Chang doesn't cover the theory or grammar of graphics really at all - but if you are only going to buy one book, IMO you should buy Chang's.
Drelajurus
If you're an R user you probably know about ggplot2. (If not, try it. It's my and many people's favorite way to do plotting in R, with beautiful and flexible plots.)

And if you use ggplot2 then you need this book. Yes, much of the material is available online, including even the PDF. Yes, there are extensive help files. Yes, you will still have to google lots of things to find answers. Some of the plot options have changed since the book was published but they still work (with helpful messages about how to update them).

But: the book is so much faster to flip through than a web search, you can mark it up, it's nicely printed in color, you will discover things serendipitously while browsing it, and buying it will support the market for such high quality texts. I'm delighted to have my own copy and, just like joining the local public radio, am proud to pay my dues.

The content of the book itself starts with a basic tutorial on quick plots, and then progresses to the more systematic "grammar of graphics" types, concluding with lots of reference material to tricky things like symbols and plot options. It's great to flip through it until I find that "I want a plot like that" and see the code right there. My only complaint is that I wish it had more on the grammar part; sometime I will need to buy and read Wilkinson The Grammar of Graphics (Statistics and Computing), too (not a replacement for this book).
Biaemi
I'm still working through this book as I gain more experience in R. However, even as someone new to R I found this immediately useful and was able to create graphs and plots that are exceedingly difficult using the base graphics in R. I rarely find a use for the base graphics package or lattice packages anymore: ggplot2 makes better looking graphics in an intuitive way, and learning ggplot2 has improved my productivity and kept me from struggling to make detailed graphics with legacy packages in R.

I purchased the Kindle edition. You'll need to view some of the examples and figures in color to fully understand them, so be prepared to either use a color Kindle Fire or view some select pages on your computer using the Kindle application. Occasionally, it isn't entirely obvious how to associate figures and examples to the main body text as the layout in the Kindle edition seems off. For example, some code and it's associated figure will be several "pages" away from the text describing the example code and figure. For this reason, it may be worthwhile for others new to R to purchase the paperback edition. But the portability of the Kindle edition makes this a nice reference to have accessible in several places at once.
Qusserel
ggplot2 is a great plotting packaged for R, and this is a good reference for the system, written by the author of the package. It does a good job of explaining the grammar of graphics on which the plotting system is based, and how that is implemented in the R package. While it can takes some time to adapted to a syntax that is very different from the base plotting syntax, the overall flexibility of the system is worth the effort, and the plots it produces are quite beautiful.

Fortunately for users of ggplot2, but unfortunately for my review of this book, the ggplot2 package is still rapidly evolving. Much has already changed since the publication of this book, so there are many parts of the ggplot2 system that are not covered by this book. I do not think there are many places that the code in the book will not work anymore, but there are some significant recent additions that are completely unmentioned. Since most of the important information is available online, it is hard to recommend the book too strongly, as the cost is not insignificant. On the other hand, I am happy to have supported the further development of the ggplot2 package (and other R projects) by whatever portion of the proceeds made it back to Hadley Wickham.