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Download Insectivorous Plants ePub

by Charles Darwin

Download Insectivorous Plants ePub
  • ISBN 1426421060
  • ISBN13 978-1426421068
  • Language English
  • Author Charles Darwin
  • Publisher BiblioBazaar (September 27, 2006)
  • Pages 432
  • Formats docx lit doc lrf
  • Category Math
  • Subcategory Nature and Ecology
  • Size ePub 1979 kb
  • Size Fb2 1663 kb
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 724

During the summer of 1860, I was surprised by finding how large a number of insects were caught by the leaves of the common sun-dew (Drosera rotundifolia) on a heath in Sussex.

Insectivorous Plants is a book by British naturalist and evolutionary theory pioneer Charles Darwin, first published on 2 July 1875 in London.

Insectivorous Plants is a book by British naturalist and evolutionary theory pioneer Charles Darwin, first published on 2 July 1875 in London. Part of a series of works by Darwin related to his theory of natural selection, the book is a study of carnivorous plants with specific attention paid to the adaptations that allow them to live in difficult conditions. It includes illustrations by Darwin himself, along with drawings by his sons George and Francis Darwin.

Чарльз Дарвин Insectivorous Plants. On one plant all six leaves had caught their prey; and on several plants very many leaves had caught more than a single insect. Chapter I. Drosera rotundifolia, or the common sun-dew. On one large leaf I found the remains of thirteen distinct insects. Flies (Diptera) are captured much oftener than other insects. The largest kind which I have seen caught was a small butterfly (Caenonympha pamphilus); but the Rev. . Wilkinson informs me that he found a large living dragon-fly with its body firmly held by two leaves.

Insectivorous Plants book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Insectivorous Plants. How is this book unique?

Charles Robert Darwin, FRS FRGS FLS FZS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist, geologist and . And so Insectivorous Plants will be interesting to those who are familiar with Darwin's life and times

Charles Robert Darwin, FRS FRGS FLS FZS (12 February 1809 – 19 April 1882) was an English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to the science of evolution. And so Insectivorous Plants will be interesting to those who are familiar with Darwin's life and times. Chapter 13 covers insectivorous plants.

Book digitized by Google from the library of Harvard University and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb.

Charles Darwin You can read Insectivorous Plants by Charles Darwin in our library for absolutely free. Read various fiction books with us in our e-reader.

Insectivorous Plants is a book by British naturalist and evolutionary theory pioneer Charles Darwin, first . The book chronicles Darwin's experiments with various carnivorous plants, in which he carefully studied their feeding mechanisms

Insectivorous Plants is a book by British naturalist and evolutionary theory pioneer Charles Darwin, first published on 2 July 1875 in London. The book chronicles Darwin's experiments with various carnivorous plants, in which he carefully studied their feeding mechanisms. Darwin tried several methods to stimulate the plants into activating their trap mechanisms, including feeding them meat and glass, blowing on them and prodding them with hair. He found that only the movement of an animal would cause the plants to react, and.

Note on the Resemblances and Differences in the Structure and the Development of the Brain in Man and Apes.

The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume 1. Charles Darwin. The Voyage of the Beagle by Charles Darwin. On the Origin of Species By Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life. Note on the Resemblances and Differences in the Structure and the Development of the Brain in Man and Apes.

Insectivorous plants. by. Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882. Carnivorous plants, Plants - Assimilation.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Halesowen Chronicle Newspaper Westminster And City News Newspaper Northampton Herald And Post Newspaper Grenfell Support News Newspaper Mk News Newspaper Oc Weekly Newspaper Shepherds Bush Chronicle Newspaper.

Darwin began his work with insectivorous plants in the mid 1860s, though . The life and letters of Charles Darwin, including an autobiographical chapter.

Darwin began his work with insectivorous plants in the mid 1860s, though his findings would not be published until 1875. In his autobiography Darwin reflected on the delay that allowed him to refine his work: "The delay in this case, as with all my other books, has been a great advantage to me; for a man after a long interval can criticise his own work, almost as well as if it were that of another person. This work allowed Darwin to focus on the features of insectivorous plants that allowed them to survive in difficult environments.

Talk about Insectivorous Plants


Cordanius
This seemed to be an expurgated version as it had no drawings and no page numbers .It is hard to follow and obviously not a true copy of the original book by Darwin except for the printed word.I intend to buy the book from some other source.
Fonceiah
In all, I was satisfied with this edition. It didn't leave any original content out, and it was an informative and entertaining read. Of course, the only problem was that a lot of the illustrations were left out, but heck, you could find those on Google Images, anyways. Otherwise, the lack of the original illustrations was just a little tedious to get over at times. Other than that, nothing very bad.
Hi_Jacker
The book itself is nice, but there are no figures inside. There are references to figure 1 or 2 for example, but there's no figure to look at! There are also no page numbers. Pretty disappointing. ):
Roram
While the text is fine, it is missing the figures. It is difficult to use without the figures.
Fenritaur
Growing carnivorous plants is my hobby, I grow them.I had a Venus fly trap, cape sunder, and a purple pitcher.
Vareyma
1. As I write, the complete works of Charles Darwin are available online for free. For instance, you can view this book's content, including all of its images, and the original page numbers, at John van Wyhe's britishlibrary website. This online version includes an excellent indexing and search facility that contains more information than the book's actual index.

2. This book describes Darwin's studies of how carnivorous plants catch, ingest and digest flies. The experiments are historically significant... and amusing, if only for the interesting forms of gunk used by Darwin to study the plants. Of the 18 chapters, the first 11 deal with one specific variety of sundew, Drosera rotundifolia. The twelfth chapter covers other varieties of sundew. The thirteenth and fourteenth chapters are on the Dionaea Muscipula (Venus fly-trap) and Aldrovanda vesiculosa (an aquatic trap). The fifteenth describes the Drosophyllum lusitanicum (Portuguese sundew), the Roridula dentata, and the Byblis. Chapter 16 covers Butterworts (Pinguicula), while the final two chapters examine Bladderworts (Utricularia).

3. If you are interested in Darwin history: In "Insectivorous Plants," we see Darwin the experimentalist, with his old friends, colleagues and family, uniting in 1874 to catalogue and understand insectivorous plants. Included in the studies are long-time Darwin associates Hooker and Thistelton-Dyer from Kew, Sanderson (experimenting with plant digestion) at University College London, Asa Gray at Harvard, and Darwin's sons. There was some correspondence with Lyell, on this topic, but Lyell's friendship with Darwin had soured, and Lyell died while Darwin worked on this book. This book initially sold more rapidly than The Origin of the Species. Francis "Frank" Darwin met and married Amy Ruck, his first wife during this time. George Romanes, who had studied with Frank at Cambridge, joined the family at this time, and may have had an influence on the book. Darwin also corresponded about such scientific greats as FC Donders. And so Insectivorous Plants will be interesting to those who are familiar with Darwin's life and times. If you want to read Darwin's correspondence during this time, see "The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin" (F. Darwin, 1905, also available online). Chapter 13 covers insectivorous plants. As the book went to press, Darwin wrote Hooker: "You ask about my book, and all that I can say is that I am ready to commit suicide; I thought it was decently written, but find so much wants rewriting, that it will not be ready to go to printers for two months, and will then make a confoundedly big book. Murray will say that it is no use publishing in the middle of summer, so I do not know what will be the upshot; but I begin to think that every one who publishes a book is a fool."

4. If you are interested in evolution, and the the evolution of insectivorous plants: There isn't much if any discussion of evolution in this book. If I'm not mistaken, Darwin took something of a break from evolutionary theory and natural selection when he wrote this book. As far as I know, Darwin didn't spend much time speculating about the evolution of these plants. Apparently, there isn't much of a fossil record of carnivorous plants. As tests of genetic similarity have improved, there has been new speculation about the evolution of carnivores. Some sources: A) Juniper, B. E., Robins, Richard J. and Joel, D. M. (1989). The Carnivorous Plants. London; San Diego, Academic Press. B) Cook, Steve R. (2001). ?When plants kill.? Accessed online: October 10, 2001. (find online) C) Cameron, Kenneth M., Wurdack, Kenneth J. and Jobson, Richard W. (2002). Molecular evidence for the common origin of snap-traps among carnivorous plants. American Journal of Botany. 89(9): 1503-1509. (find online). Barry Rice's new book is due out any day, and I feel confident that it will examine this issue clearly.

5. If you are interested in learning more about carnivorous plants, take a look at the list of sources I'll post under Listmania. I feel confident that the new book by Barry Rice will be an excellent source. There are excellent books to consider that have been authored by Gordon Cheers, Peter D'Amato, Rica Erickson, Barry Juniper et al., Patricia Kite, Francis Lloyd (1940's), Allen Lowrie, Charles Nelson, James & Patricia Pietropaulo, Nick Romanowski, Donald Schnell, Adrian Slack, Dorothy Souza, and others. The new book by Rice is probably the most important new book since Schnell (2002) and D'Amato (1998), both highly recommended. Much depends on your interests and level of knowledge. So stay tuned for my list!
Gadar
The "product" being offered for sale on this page is the original edition, published in 1875 by Appleton, not a reprint. Look at the description closely (publication details).